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Will a gaming laptop and gaming desktop with equal components and power, perform the same when using a monitor?

evan44
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I'm thinking about whether I should build a PC or buy a laptop.  Building one, I could put better componets in it and for cheaper (I'm not getting a Predator 21X :) ).  If I built one I was thinking an AMD Threadripper 1900X and an Aurus Xtreme Edition 1080 Ti (Higher end, but not crazy).  I also would like to be able to take it places though, which is where I would like a laptop.  If I were to get a laptop, I was thinking the Asus ROG Zephyrus GX501GI, which has a 1080, not Ti, an Intel Core i7-8750H, 16Gb RAM, and 512Gb of SSD.  This is $2,899, while the PC I would most likely build instead, which has similar specs but slightly better components, would be about $2,500 (Without Windows included, which the laptop comes with).  Anyways, although the laptop is obviously less powerful, would just the fact that it's a laptop affect gaming performance while at home using a monitor?  I am mainly interested in if the overall concept of a laptop will mean longer response time.  The Asus ROG Zephyrus GX501GI also only has an HDMI port and no DP.  So how far off would performace be between the Asus ROG Zephyrus GX501GI from a desktop with similar specs, but slightly better components?

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First things first:

4 minutes ago, evan44 said:

AMD Threadripper 1900X

Only get this if you plan on upgrading to more cores (which would take this build away from gaming PC and into workstation territory)

You'll get better gaming performance with ryzen 7

 

Second, a laptop will almost always be performing worse because they use lesser power delivery, and the zephyrus you linked, while extremely sleek and capable, will not be on par with a desktop of the same spec.

 

The choice boils down to whether or not you value performance over portability, or vice versa. 

 

And no, a monitor would not affect gaming performance.

I WILL find your ITX build thread, and I WILL recommend the SIlverstone Sugo SG13B

 

Primary PC:

i7 8086k (won) - EVGA Z370 Classified K - G.Skill Trident Z RGB - WD SN750 - Jedi Order Titan Xp - Hyper 212 Black (with RGB Riing flair) - EVGA G3 650W - dual booting Windows 10 and Linux - Black and green theme, Razer brainwashed me.

Draws 400 watts under max load, for reference.

 

Linux Proliant ML150 G6:

Dual Xeon X5560 - 24GB ECC DDR3 - GTX 750 TI - old Seagate 1.5TB HDD - dark mode Ubuntu (and Win7, cuz why not)

 

How many watts do I need? Seasonic Focus thread, PSU misconceptions, protections explainedgroup reg is bad

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Why a Threadripper? Are you planning on doing video editing/ 3d modelling?

Ryzen 5 1600 @ 3.9 Ghz  | Gigabyte AB350M Gaming 3 |  PaliT GTX 1050Ti  |  8gb Kingston HyperX Fury @ 2933 Mhz  |  Corsair CX550m  |  1 TB WD Blue HDD


Inside some old case I found lying around.

 

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Laptop's are full of compromises: weight, battery life, performance. If you want to have good gaming performance just build a desktop. You can just haul it to LAN parties like a normal person then just set it up on your desk and have a full gaming experience.

 

3 hours ago, evan44 said:

Higher end, but not crazy

Getting a Threadripper for gaming is crazy, and not the good kind.

 

Just go with a desktop build. People buy gaming laptops knowing they will have to compromise on something. For me, I would buy one knowing that I would compromise on performance. Since you don't appear to want to do that, you will have to compromise on something else. Find out what is worth it to you.

Rest In Peace my old signature...                  September 11th 2018 ~ December 26th 2018

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