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Safe to remove drive letter?

CYKA
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There are several SSD's in my computer and one of them is reserved for my private data which I don't want to share with anyone else. When I don't use this particular drive, I remove the letter assigned to it in Windows' Disk Management. When I want to use the drive, I just add the letter back. The data on the drive consist only of text, image and video files so there are no program files that rely on drive letters and paths. So far this has worked without problems. Are there any risks related to this, such as data corruption? Everything on the drive is backed up of course.

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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I do not see why data corruption would occur, however this is windows you are talking about, although it should be relatively similar to just mounting and unmounting a drive in Linux, just without linux's fancyness.

Sadness is the one true emotion, and happiness, well, that's just a lie, sadness is all many of us feel, and is all we need to feel, because having it any other way, would just be wrong, why be happy when you can just be miserable like myself. 

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as far as i know you'll be safe doing this, but why not plugging it in when you need it and safely turn off your system and plug it out when someone else needs the pc?

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1 minute ago, LukeSavenije said:

as far as i know you'll be safe doing this, but why not plugging it in when you need it and safely turn off your system and plug it out when someone else needs the pc?

Well in that case I would have to open the side panel of my case, plug in the cables when I want to use the drive and vice versa when I'm not using the drive, since this is an internal SATA3-SSD. More work to be done.

 

I could buy an external enclosure for the SSD though and use it as an external SSD. Dunno, feels simplest this way. And it's always connected to a power source so the charge in the NAND cells shouldn't fade out, amirite?

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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Just now, CYKA said:

Well in that case I would have to open the side panel of my case, plug in the cables when I want to use the drive and vice versa when I'm not using the drive, since this is an internal SATA3-SSD. More work to be done.

 

I could buy an external enclosure for the SSD though and use it as an external SSD. Dunno, feels simplest this way. And it's always connected to a power source so the charge in the NAND cells shouldn't fade out, amirite?

you should be fine with what you do, as murpheys law says: if it's stupid but it works, it isn't stupid

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Use internal enclosure instead of external. SATA is hotswap. You can even set which sata port should be treated as hotswap in bios.

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5 minutes ago, homeap5 said:

Use internal enclosure instead of external. SATA is hotswap. You can even set which sata port should be treated as hotswap in bios.

Umm yes but that would still require me to open and close the side panel door on my computer case everytime I need to insert or remove the SSD?

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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5 minutes ago, CYKA said:

Umm yes but that would still require me to open and close the side panel door on my computer case everytime I need to insert or remove the SSD?

If you have a spare 5.25 bay:
img.scale.listerf7qYjJ.06d67df86da6b54c7

 

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8 minutes ago, CYKA said:

Umm yes but that would still require me to open and close the side panel door on my computer case everytime I need to insert or remove the SSD?

No.

enc.jpg.30d0afc2f3d8ef64f13bccc91e7810d8.jpg

I have something like that.

It works great. I also have similar for 3,5 drive.

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1 minute ago, Olaf6541 said:

If you have a spare 5.25 bay:
img.scale.listerf7qYjJ.06d67df86da6b54c7

 

 

Just now, homeap5 said:

No.

enc.jpg.30d0afc2f3d8ef64f13bccc91e7810d8.jpg

I have something like that.

It works great.

Unfortunately my case has no 5.25" slots or bays. :(

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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7 minutes ago, homeap5 said:

But this for SSD require 3,5" bay (it's for 2,5" drive).

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817974005

 

And like I said before, my computer case doesn't have anykind of external slots/ports/bays for drives. I don't want to take off and put back in the side panel door of the case all the time.

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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3 minutes ago, CYKA said:

And like I said before, my computer case doesn't have anykind of external slots/ports/bays for drives. I don't want to take off and put back in the side panel door of the case all the time.

So, answering your question - you can remove and add drive letter anytime - it only changes way Windows see the drive.

BTW. What kind of case is that? Without any possibility to insert any extensions?

 

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Just now, homeap5 said:

So, answering your question - you can remove and add drive letter anytime - it only changes way Windows see the drive.

BTW. What kind of case is that? Without any possibility to insert any extensions?

 

Fractal Design Define C.

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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25 minutes ago, CYKA said:

 

Unfortunately my case has no 5.25" slots or bays. :(

Then the most simple way of using your ssd is removing the drive letter, which will not cause any corruption whatsoever.

Unless there are private files on the drive, because this does not prevent anyone else from reassigning a drive letter and accessing your data ofcourse.

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Just now, Olaf6541 said:

Then the most simple way of using your ssd is removing the drive letter, which will not cause any corruption whatsoever.

Unless there are private files on the drive, because this does not prevent anyone else from reassigning a drive letter and accessing your data ofcourse.

Of course that's a possibility but there aren't any people using my PC that know how to do this, so I'm not worried.

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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3 minutes ago, homeap5 said:

BTW. EMK3105 is for back mounting if you have no front bays. :)

 

Hmm now that's an interesting solution. I'm gonna check out that product.

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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Startech makes a hot swap bay that mounts in a PCI slot at the back of the computer.

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817998052&cm_re=pci_2.5"_drive_bay-_-17-998-052-_-Product

 

I have used a two bay version of this one that that's mounted in a 5.25" bay so the PCI slot version should work just fine.

Jeannie

 

As long as anyone is oppressed, no one will be safe and free.

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!

 

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20 minutes ago, Lady Fitzgerald said:

Startech makes a hot swap bay that mounts in a PCI slot at the back of the computer.

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817998052&cm_re=pci_2.5"_drive_bay-_-17-998-052-_-Product

 

I have used a two bay version of this one that that's mounted in a 5.25" bay so the PCI slot version should work just fine.

Can I just take my internal SSD out and plug it in this device and will it work, or do I have to format the drive first or something?

Omae wa mou shindeiru.

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18 minutes ago, CYKA said:

Can I just take my internal SSD out and plug it in this device and will it work, or do I have to format the drive first or something?

The device is plug and play. Just install it and connect a SATA data and SATA power cable to it (if the SATA port on the MOBO can be set to hot swappable, you won't even need to power dow the computer to inseret and eject the drive). You will not need to format the drive the existing drive; just remove it from the computer (I strongly recommend doing that while the computer is powered down and the PSU disconnected from the wall power) and plug it into the hot swap bay.

 

If you aren't doing so already, I strongly recommend backing up the drive before doing anything with it. While it is extremely unlikely anything will happen, 'tis better to be safe than sorry. You should maintain backups of all the drives in your computer anyway since "stuff" happens.

Jeannie

 

As long as anyone is oppressed, no one will be safe and free.

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!

 

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Wait a moment. this is not entirely true.

 

First - SATA is hotplug by design, not by BIOS option. Option is only for different treat drive in system - as removable (so you can use safety remove for prevent data loss if you remove your drive before all data are written). So both ways it's safe and I plug SATA drives for years without problem or disconnecting computer from power or from the wall power. It's too much. :)

 

Backing up drive is no needed, since you just remove drive from one sata port and plug into another sata port. It's the same as you disconnect drive and connect again - do you made backup every time you disconnects drive? Or backup before any power down? No, so it's not needed in this case too.

 

So just install hardware, connect to SATA and you can plug your drive whenever you want. You can turn on HOTSWAP in BIOS of course if you want.

 

EDIT: Now I see that post above was changed.

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39 minutes ago, homeap5 said:

Wait a moment. this is not entirely true.

 

First - SATA is hotplug by design, not by BIOS option. Option is only for different treat drive in system - as removable (so you can use safety remove for prevent data loss if you remove your drive before all data are written). So both ways it's safe and I plug SATA drives for years without problem or disconnecting computer from power or from the wall power. It's too much. :)

 

Backing up drive is no needed, since you just remove drive from one sata port and plug into another sata port. It's the same as you disconnect drive and connect again - do you made backup every time you disconnects drive? Or backup before any power down? No, so it's not needed in this case too.

 

So just install hardware, connect to SATA and you can plug your drive whenever you want. You can turn on HOTSWAP in BIOS of course if you want.

 

EDIT: Now I see that post above was changed.

No, you wait a moment. Maybe you don't understand what hot pluggable, also called hot swappable, means. It means the ability to plug in a SATA drive without having to be powered down first. If you plug a SATA drive into a SATA port that is not hot swappable, it will not show up in the OS until you reboot.

 

Not all SATA ports are hot swappable. Often, the ones that are can have hot swap enabled or disabled in the BIOS. I've done so numerous times so don't tell me it can't be done. On my last desktop with a P9x79 WS MOBO, only the six Intel SATA ports were hot swappable and had the option to enable or disable in the BIOS. The four Marvell ports were not hot swappable, period.

 

Only idiots and the uninformed do not backup their drives. I update my drive backups every time I make any changes to a drive, such as updating the OS or programs, etc. or do work on the computer. That includes removing a drive that has been permanently installed even though the likelihood of things going sideways is extremely low. Why take chances? As I pointed out, one should have backups of every drive in a computer anyway so why not update  the backup before doing anything with it?

 

 

Jeannie

 

As long as anyone is oppressed, no one will be safe and free.

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!

 

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No, some controllers may be not swappable (more like controller driver not see changes) but this has nothing to do with BIOS option. I using hotswap by years even on old motherboards without that option, so I know what I'm talking about.

 

And I make backups, but not every drive swap or remove. It's paranoid.

 

I don't know where I say that something can't be done, you must read my post wrong. And you already starts with some "idiots" examples, so I don't want to continue this discussion.

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6 minutes ago, homeap5 said:

No, some controllers may be not swappable (more like controller driver not see changes) but this has nothing to do with BIOS option. I using hotswap by years even on old motherboards without that option, so I know what I'm talking about.

Are you calling me a liar (not to mention an idiot)? Be glad you aren't doing it to my face!

 

What part of I've been enabling and disabling hot swap in the BIOS did you not understand? Granted, not all BIOSes may offer the option but that doesn't mean none of them do.

 

Below are a couple of BIOS screens that do have the option to enable or disable hot plug.

 

1368796000_Hotplug1.thumb.jpg.7d32188cf06dbcaa98a200ed7846a9af.jpg

 

hotplug2.png.b9540683ae05b077707b032259b7f6ce.png

 

Jeannie

 

As long as anyone is oppressed, no one will be safe and free.

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!

 

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