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What is the point of having a larger than 128gb SSD

Mugenjynn
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Go to solution Solved by Jurrunio,

128gb SSDs often use less  NAND flash module than larger capacity ines, which means it has less bandwidth. This makes them slower in general.

I run a 1tb hard drive with a 128gb ssd on my gaming pc and I don’t understand the point of having more memory on the ssd.

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1 minute ago, Mugenjynn said:

I run a 1tb hard drive with a 128gb ssd on my gaming pc and I don’t understand the point of having more memory on the ssd.

put more games and programs to load quicker, rather then just the os and a few programs 

PC: CPU: i5-9600k - CPU Cooler: be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 - GPU: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8GB GDDR6 - Motherboard: ASRock - Z370 Extreme4 - RAM: Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB DDR4-3000 - PSU: Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply - Case: Thermaltake - Core G21 TG

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Faster storage. For example, it's useful for me for larger video editing projects that I am working on. The mechanical hard drive could then me used for storing them after I'm done. 

print "Hello World!" ("Hello World!")

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128gb SSDs often use less  NAND flash module than larger capacity ines, which means it has less bandwidth. This makes them slower in general.

CPU: i7-2600K 4751MHz 1.44V (software) --> 1.47V at the back of the socket Motherboard: Asrock Z77 Extreme4 (BCLK: 103.3MHz) CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 RAM: Adata XPG 2x8GB DDR3 (XMP: 2133MHz 10-11-11-30 CR2, custom: 2203MHz 10-11-10-26 CR1 tRFC:230 tREFI:14000) GPU: Asus GTX 1070 Dual (Super Jetstream vbios, +70(2025-2088MHz)/+400(8.8Gbps)) SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB (main boot drive), Transcend SSD370 128GB PSU: Seasonic X-660 80+ Gold Case: Antec P110 Silent, 5 intakes 1 exhaust Monitor: AOC G2460PF 1080p 144Hz (150Hz max w/ DP, 121Hz max w/ HDMI) TN panel Keyboard: Logitech G610 Orion (Cherry MX Blue) with SteelSeries Apex M260 keycaps Mouse: BenQ Zowie FK1

 

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My case is too small to have any hard drive installed. While SSD is small enough where I can just stick it somewhere in case. Also I have server for my mass storage needs which is another room and spinning hard drive is kinda annoying at idle when PC is pretty much right next to me.

 

Plus the fact SSD is becoming pretty cheap nowdays, 100 AUD for 500GB is pretty decent and 500gb is pretty much what everyone need nowdays unless you're power user.

Magical Pineapples


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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I use a 1TB SSD so I can install all my games, have my data and whatnot on it. Much quicker and allows me to record my gaming sessions directly to the SSD without having to worry about running out of room. Nothing like recording off of OBS at 50k bitrate. Plus it allows me to scrub through files quicker and easier. 

 

The other reason is faster game load times, overall better reliability and overall easier data management. 

 

I do have a 4TB RAID in my system as well but it is mainly for extra stuff: Archives of my streaming sessions, storage for my PS2 games for emulation and anything else I deem of lower priority. 

Be sure to @Pickles - Lord of the Jar if you want me to see your reply!

Stopping by to praise the all mighty jar Lord pickles... * drinks from a chalice of holy pickle juice and tossed dill over shoulder* ~ @WarDance
3600x | NH-D15 Chromax Black | 32GB 3200MHz | ASUS KO RTX 3070 UnderVolted and UnderClocked | Gigabyte X570 Aorus Elite | Seasonic X760w | Phanteks Evolv X | 500GB WD_Black SN750 | Sandisk Skyhawk 3.84TB SSD | 4TB HDD 

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The larger the percentage of an SSD that is kept empty, the longer it will last and the faster it will be (in addition to the speed increase for being larger). The speed increases from larger SSDs aren't particularly noticeable, at all, but the life increase can be significant. SSDs ideally should have 20-25% empty space in addition to the factory overprovisioning. 

 

How large an SSD is needed will vary from user to user. Most users who don't do any gaming and just use a few programs can do just fine with 120-128GB for a separate boot drive (and keep data on other drives). Slightly heavier users with more programs or occasional games will be better of with 20-256GB. Gamers or heavy users may need even larger SSDs. People who multiboot will need larger drives.

 

Notebooks and smaller and/or cheaper laptops have room for only one drive so, to take advantage of the greater speed of SSDs when booting and opening programs, an SSD in one of those has to double duty as a boot drive and data storage. I'm running a 2TB Samsung 850 EVO in the notebook I'm using at this moment that has 693GB free space on it. It has four partitions: System Reserved, C:/ for the OS and programs, E:/ for data only, and the factory recovery partition.

 

While HDDs are still king for storing data due to being far less expensive than SSDs, SSDs have advantages that can overcome their higher cost. My recently deceased desktop machine had four 4TB SSDs in it (I recently purchased more drives to add a fifth one when I finish the machine I'm building). While the increased speed of the SSDs is highly desirable, the primary reason for me to get them was the reduced size and weight of the backup drives. Lugging 3.5" backup HDDs to and from my safe deposit box at my credit union was killing my shoulders and back (I'm a disabled flatulent geriatric). For me, the cost of the SSDs was well worth it.

Jeannie

 

As long as anyone is oppressed, no one will be safe and free.

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!

 

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16 minutes ago, Lady Fitzgerald said:

The larger the percentage of an SSD that is kept empty, the longer it will last and the faster it will be (in addition to the speed increase for being larger). The speed increases from larger SSDs aren't particularly noticeable, at all, but the life increase can be significant. SSDs ideally should have 20-25% empty space in addition to the factory overprovisioning. 

 

How large an SSD is needed will vary from user to user. Most users who don't do any gaming and just use a few programs can do just fine with 120-128GB for a separate boot drive (and keep data on other drives). Slightly heavier users with more programs or occasional games will be better of with 20-256GB. Gamers or heavy users may need even larger SSDs. People who multiboot will need larger drives.

 

Notebooks and smaller and/or cheaper laptops have room for only one drive so, to take advantage of the greater speed of SSDs when booting and opening programs, an SSD in one of those has to double duty as a boot drive and data storage. I'm running a 2TB Samsung 850 EVO in the notebook I'm using at this moment that has 693GB free space on it. It has four partitions: System Reserved, C:/ for the OS and programs, E:/ for data only, and the factory recovery partition.

 

While HDDs are still king for storing data due to being far less expensive than SSDs, SSDs have advantages that can overcome their higher cost. My recently deceased desktop machine had four 4TB SSDs in it (I recently purchased more drives to add a fifth one when I finish the machine I'm building). While the increased speed of the SSDs is highly desirable, the primary reason for me to get them was the reduced size and weight of the backup drives. Lugging 3.5" backup HDDs to and from my safe deposit box at my credit union was killing my shoulders and back (I'm a disabled flatulent geriatric). For me, the cost of the SSDs was well worth it.

You are such a smart cookie. ❤️

 

But yes pretty much hit the nail on the head there. 

Be sure to @Pickles - Lord of the Jar if you want me to see your reply!

Stopping by to praise the all mighty jar Lord pickles... * drinks from a chalice of holy pickle juice and tossed dill over shoulder* ~ @WarDance
3600x | NH-D15 Chromax Black | 32GB 3200MHz | ASUS KO RTX 3070 UnderVolted and UnderClocked | Gigabyte X570 Aorus Elite | Seasonic X760w | Phanteks Evolv X | 500GB WD_Black SN750 | Sandisk Skyhawk 3.84TB SSD | 4TB HDD 

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