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Can I make you own OS?? What is Docker?? What are its usage?? Can I use it to make my own OS???

You can make your own OS, but if you are capable of making one that works, you wont be asking a question like this.

 

Docker is used to set up virtual machines in Linux. Each of these virtual machines will run as if they are independent from each other, but you still need a Linux environment to use it.

 

These virtual machines still run Linux, so you cant use it to make a new OS

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Docker is a way to run an application in a container. Meaning the application will run seperate to anything else on the system (unless you want it to) It only has access to whatever is nesseary for it to run. It's an alternative to run a number of virtual machines with a single purpose.

 

Could it be used to make you own os? No.

Can you make your own OS? probably yes. Though it's more likely you would modify an existing OS.

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47 minutes ago, Jurrunio said:

You can make your own OS, but if you are capable of making one that works, you wont be asking a question like this.

 

Docker is used to set up virtual machines in Linux. Each of these virtual machines will run as if they are independent from each other, but you still need a Linux environment to use it.

 

These virtual machines still run Linux, so you cant use it to make a new OS

Docker runs containers not virtual machines. The container can be any Linux distro's userland that talks to the host kernel without an abstraction layer.

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25 minutes ago, Name Taken said:

Docker runs containers not virtual machines. The container can be any Linux distro's userland that talks to the host kernel without an abstraction layer.

Partially true. If you are not running a Linux host (macOS or Windows, for example), Docker will set up a Linux virtual machine because it needs a Linux kernel to run containers. 

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30 minutes ago, jj9987 said:

Partially true. If you are not running a Linux host (macOS or Windows, for example), Docker will set up a Linux virtual machine because it needs a Linux kernel to run containers. 

Docker itself does not setup any virtual machines. You are thinking of Docker Machine.

 

https://docs.docker.com/machine/overview/

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28 minutes ago, jj9987 said:

Partially true. If you are not running a Linux host (macOS or Windows, for example), Docker will set up a Linux virtual machine because it needs a Linux kernel to run containers. 

docker windows container run on windows server they need no Linux kernel.

 

containers are vastly different VM's this is important because you cant simply run any *nix  container under any distro/kernel, there are some limitations.

 

the easiest way to think about containers is packages. a container is a package that contains everything you need to a run an application (if the application is more complex and needs more things like a DB them multiple containers work together, application + db for example) this separation makes it easy to distribute applications that will require otherwise to install a plethora of requirements on a system.

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If you're interested in making your own OS, you could look into Linux from Scratch to even begin on making your own OS which would be pretty educational: http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/lfs/view/stable/

 

As for Docker, it's basically a container to compartmentalize a software apart from the rest of the system. (Though you could compartmentalize a software by using SELinux with well configured Mandatory Access Control Policy.) As for using it for making your own operating system, no, you'll have to run docker and Kernel is basically handling that.

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1 hour ago, Name Taken said:

Docker itself does not setup any virtual machines. You are thinking of Docker Machine.

 

https://docs.docker.com/machine/overview/

No, I am talking about the Docker Engine itself.

Docker needs a Linux kernel to run Linux containers (thanks for the note @lacion, forgot the windows part). Therefor it sets up a virtual machine using Hyper-V to have a Linux kernel that can be used as host for the containers. Using Hyper-V gives much better performance than using VirtualBox, for example. This is why Docker for Windows requires you to have Hyper-V installed and available (hence no support for Windows 10 Home because Hyper-V is not available there).

 

Windows containers do not create a virtual machine indeed, although these do not seem to be that widely used yet. They use Windows kernel and do not require a Linux VM/kernel.

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23 minutes ago, jj9987 said:

No, I am talking about the Docker Engine itself.

Docker needs a Linux kernel to run Linux containers (thanks for the note @lacion, forgot the windows part). Therefor it sets up a virtual machine using Hyper-V to have a Linux kernel that can be used as host for the containers. Using Hyper-V gives much better performance than using VirtualBox, for example. This is why Docker for Windows requires you to have Hyper-V installed and available (hence no support for Windows 10 Home because Hyper-V is not available there).

 

Windows containers do not create a virtual machine indeed, although these do not seem to be that widely used yet. They use Windows kernel and do not require a Linux VM/kernel.

I have Docker running on my Linux home server and these are the command line options:

 


Usage:	docker COMMAND

A self-sufficient runtime for containers

Options:
      --config string      Location of client config files (default "/home/owner/.docker")
  -D, --debug              Enable debug mode
      --help               Print usage
  -H, --host list          Daemon socket(s) to connect to
  -l, --log-level string   Set the logging level ("debug"|"info"|"warn"|"error"|"fatal") (default "info")
      --tls                Use TLS; implied by --tlsverify
      --tlscacert string   Trust certs signed only by this CA (default "/home/owner/.docker/ca.pem")
      --tlscert string     Path to TLS certificate file (default "/home/owner/.docker/cert.pem")
      --tlskey string      Path to TLS key file (default "/home/owner/.docker/key.pem")
      --tlsverify          Use TLS and verify the remote
  -v, --version            Print version information and quit

Management Commands:
  config      Manage Docker configs
  container   Manage containers
  image       Manage images
  network     Manage networks
  node        Manage Swarm nodes
  plugin      Manage plugins
  secret      Manage Docker secrets
  service     Manage services
  stack       Manage Docker stacks
  swarm       Manage Swarm
  system      Manage Docker
  trust       Manage trust on Docker images (experimental)
  volume      Manage volumes

Commands:
  attach      Attach local standard input, output, and error streams to a running container
  build       Build an image from a Dockerfile
  commit      Create a new image from a container's changes
  cp          Copy files/folders between a container and the local filesystem
  create      Create a new container
  diff        Inspect changes to files or directories on a container's filesystem
  events      Get real time events from the server
  exec        Run a command in a running container
  export      Export a container's filesystem as a tar archive
  history     Show the history of an image
  images      List images
  import      Import the contents from a tarball to create a filesystem image
  info        Display system-wide information
  inspect     Return low-level information on Docker objects
  kill        Kill one or more running containers
  load        Load an image from a tar archive or STDIN
  login       Log in to a Docker registry
  logout      Log out from a Docker registry
  logs        Fetch the logs of a container
  pause       Pause all processes within one or more containers
  port        List port mappings or a specific mapping for the container
  ps          List containers
  pull        Pull an image or a repository from a registry
  push        Push an image or a repository to a registry
  rename      Rename a container
  restart     Restart one or more containers
  rm          Remove one or more containers
  rmi         Remove one or more images
  run         Run a command in a new container
  save        Save one or more images to a tar archive (streamed to STDOUT by default)
  search      Search the Docker Hub for images
  start       Start one or more stopped containers
  stats       Display a live stream of container(s) resource usage statistics
  stop        Stop one or more running containers
  tag         Create a tag TARGET_IMAGE that refers to SOURCE_IMAGE
  top         Display the running processes of a container
  unpause     Unpause all processes within one or more containers
  update      Update configuration of one or more containers
  version     Show the Docker version information
  wait        Block until one or more containers stop, then print their exit codes

Run 'docker COMMAND --help' for more information on a command.

Which one these commands sets up a virtual machine? If I want to create a local VM to run Docker containers in I would run

 

$ docker-machine create --driver virtualbox dev
$ eval "$(docker-machine env dev)"
$ docker run ...

 

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1 hour ago, Name Taken said:

I have Docker running on my Linux home server and these are the command line options:

 



Usage:	docker COMMAND

A self-sufficient runtime for containers

Options:
      --config string      Location of client config files (default "/home/owner/.docker")
  -D, --debug              Enable debug mode
      --help               Print usage
  -H, --host list          Daemon socket(s) to connect to
  -l, --log-level string   Set the logging level ("debug"|"info"|"warn"|"error"|"fatal") (default "info")
      --tls                Use TLS; implied by --tlsverify
      --tlscacert string   Trust certs signed only by this CA (default "/home/owner/.docker/ca.pem")
      --tlscert string     Path to TLS certificate file (default "/home/owner/.docker/cert.pem")
      --tlskey string      Path to TLS key file (default "/home/owner/.docker/key.pem")
      --tlsverify          Use TLS and verify the remote
  -v, --version            Print version information and quit

Management Commands:
  config      Manage Docker configs
  container   Manage containers
  image       Manage images
  network     Manage networks
  node        Manage Swarm nodes
  plugin      Manage plugins
  secret      Manage Docker secrets
  service     Manage services
  stack       Manage Docker stacks
  swarm       Manage Swarm
  system      Manage Docker
  trust       Manage trust on Docker images (experimental)
  volume      Manage volumes

Commands:
  attach      Attach local standard input, output, and error streams to a running container
  build       Build an image from a Dockerfile
  commit      Create a new image from a container's changes
  cp          Copy files/folders between a container and the local filesystem
  create      Create a new container
  diff        Inspect changes to files or directories on a container's filesystem
  events      Get real time events from the server
  exec        Run a command in a running container
  export      Export a container's filesystem as a tar archive
  history     Show the history of an image
  images      List images
  import      Import the contents from a tarball to create a filesystem image
  info        Display system-wide information
  inspect     Return low-level information on Docker objects
  kill        Kill one or more running containers
  load        Load an image from a tar archive or STDIN
  login       Log in to a Docker registry
  logout      Log out from a Docker registry
  logs        Fetch the logs of a container
  pause       Pause all processes within one or more containers
  port        List port mappings or a specific mapping for the container
  ps          List containers
  pull        Pull an image or a repository from a registry
  push        Push an image or a repository to a registry
  rename      Rename a container
  restart     Restart one or more containers
  rm          Remove one or more containers
  rmi         Remove one or more images
  run         Run a command in a new container
  save        Save one or more images to a tar archive (streamed to STDOUT by default)
  search      Search the Docker Hub for images
  start       Start one or more stopped containers
  stats       Display a live stream of container(s) resource usage statistics
  stop        Stop one or more running containers
  tag         Create a tag TARGET_IMAGE that refers to SOURCE_IMAGE
  top         Display the running processes of a container
  unpause     Unpause all processes within one or more containers
  update      Update configuration of one or more containers
  version     Show the Docker version information
  wait        Block until one or more containers stop, then print their exit codes

Run 'docker COMMAND --help' for more information on a command.

Which one these commands sets up a virtual machine? If I want to create a local VM to run Docker containers in I would run

 


$ docker-machine create --driver virtualbox dev
$ eval "$(docker-machine env dev)"
$ docker run ...

 

As I said before, Docker does not use one on Linux because it already has access to a Linux kernel.

The virtual machine is setup during installation only on non-Linux platforms, because it has no Linux kernel there to run Linux containers.

Skynet: MacBook Pro Late 2016 Space Gray | i7-6820HQ 2.7 GHz | 16 GB LPDDR3 | Radeon Pro 455 2048 MB | 512 GB NVMe SSD | 15" 2880x1800

HAL9000: Intel i5-9600k | Cryorig M9 | 32 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz | Gigabyte Z390I AORUS PRO WIFI | MSI GTX 1080 Ti SeaHawk X | 1 TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus + 1 TB Crucial MX500 + 512 GB Samsung 970 Evo Plus | Corsair TX650M | NZXT H210i | LG 34UM95 34" 3440x1440

Hydrogen server: AMD Ryzen 9 3900x | AMD Wraith Prism | 64 GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DDR4 | Asus Prime X570 Pro | Corsair HX1000 | 256 GB Samsung 850 Evo + 1 TB Crucial MX500 + 4x 3 TB + 2 TB WD Red/Seagate/Toshiba  | Fractal Design Define R5 | unRAID 6.8.3

Carbon server: Fujitsu PRIMERGY RX100 S7p | Xeon E3-1230 v2 | 16 GB DDR3 ECC | 60 GB Corsair SSD & 250 GB Samsung 850 Pro | Intel i340-T4 | ESXi 6.5.1

Big Mac cluster: 2x Raspberry Pi 2 Model B | 1x Raspberry Pi 3 Model B | 2x Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

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1 hour ago, jj9987 said:

As I said before, Docker does not use one on Linux because it already has access to a Linux kernel.

The virtual machine is setup during installation only on non-Linux platforms, because it has no Linux kernel there to run Linux containers.

I'm referring to Docker as just the core Linux runtime daemon, not all the other stuff built around it like for setting up VMs.

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4 hours ago, Name Taken said:

I'm referring to Docker as just the core Linux runtime daemon, not all the other stuff built around it like for setting up VMs.

Docket for windows is just a simplification from docker + docker machine but it’s he same context on windows it uses hyper v and on OS X it uses the native virtualization system but it’s basically the same thing as when we had to use virtual box, that is done becouse in order to run Linux containers you need a Linux host so they can use the kernel.

 

docker itself (or moby how is called now) it’s written in golang and has no ties to *nix or the *nix kernels 

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5 hours ago, lacion said:

Docket for windows is just a simplification from docker + docker machine but it’s he same context on windows it uses hyper v and on OS X it uses the native virtualization system but it’s basically the same thing as when we had to use virtual box, that is done becouse in order to run Linux containers you need a Linux host so they can use the kernel.

 

docker itself (or moby how is called now) it’s written in golang and has no ties to *nix or the *nix kernels 

Docker was developed as a wrapper around LXC (Linux Containers) then they implemented their own Libcontainer library and now using runc to comply with the OCI standard.

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what do you mean your own OS? Are you going to write your own kernel from scratch? 

Sudo make me a sandwich 

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