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Oh Masters! Help me upgrade a system. (1000$)

So recently I've been dealing with temperature issues with my CPU and as suggested on the forums here, it is most likely the issue with TIM and I may have to delid the CPU,

Which is very risky and for some reason I can't find the tools here in India to do that, I'll have to take it to the repair store and see.

But on a second thought, I'm more considering that I should be upgrading my PC right now.

 

My current specs :

Processor : Intel Core i7-4770K

Motherboard : Asus Z97-A

RAM : HyperX 8GB DDR3 (x2)

PSU : Corsair CX600W

GPU : Asus GTX 780 DC II OC

Cooler : Corsair GTX H100i

Chassis : CoolerMaster CM690 III

 

Now I want to keep my Cooler as I don't think there's any problem with that, the pump seems cool enough and it's working just fine so far.

I'll keep my graphics card for now and also the chassis, I don' think I need to upgrade those for now.

What I want to upgrade is the CPU so it's obvious I'll need a new Motherboard + DDR4 RAM + PSU

 

Which is why I seek help from you guys, I'm not much into tech to know which one would be best for me, my daily use of PC is for 3D Modeling studies and gaming.

I sculpt and model characters, or well, at least learning to, for now. Studying online.

I game in my free time and keep myself up to date with the big titles that come out, so I'm not using it for Minecraft.

I would like to upgrade my GPU sometime next year, I'll be running with GTX 780 for now.

 

So I was suggested by some guy in my area that I should go with :

+ Ryzen 1700

+ Asus B350

+ 16 GB DDR4

And for the PSU, I considered

+ Corsair RM850

 

The cost estimated roughly will come around to 65000 Rs. that translates to about 1000 US Dollars.

 

I initially wanted and still have my heart set on Intel's new Core i7 8700K but the dude told me that I shouldn't go with an Intel setup this time, I don't know the reasons he just told me that it would be better to go with Ryzen for my needs.

 

So I need the help of you people.

 

My important question would be :

 

Ryzen or Coffeelake?

 

According to what's suggested, please let me know the setup I should run with to upgrade (CPU + Motherboard + RAM + PSU)

 

EDIT : I learned that if I go with Ryzen, I will need an AM4 Upgrade kit for my GTX H100i Cooler, is there any upgrade kit required if I go with Cofffeelake?

 

 

Thank you!

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Wow thats a bummer because your pc should still work absolutely great  even by todays standards. I hope that you can get it fixed! 

For a new build, what are you going to be doing with it mainly? Honestly whoever told you to disregard intel is a bit full of it, there are good things to be had from both sides in different price ranges. Ryzen gets you into great multitasking workloads for very affordable pricing, and can be a pretty darn good cpu for gaming as well. But, depending on what settings your playing on, intel can have a big reach ahead in the gaming category due to its better IPC. Ryzen is a great all around chip, but if your a pure gamer, then intel should be your route and If you want a rig that will do great in gaming and great in heavy workloads while being more affordable then Ryzen is your chip. Theres no room for being biased when your wanting the best bang for your buck to suit your own needs.

Give us a few details on what you want out of the PC. Gaming purely, mixed, playing 1080P,1440,4k? and a rough budget for us to go on ^_^

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1 minute ago, Trulop said:

Wow thats a bummer because your pc should still work absolutely great  even by todays standards. I hope that you can get it fixed! 

For a new build, what are you going to be doing with it mainly? Honestly whoever told you to disregard intel is a bit full of it, there are good things to be had from both sides in different price ranges. Ryzen gets you into great multitasking workloads for very affordable pricing, and can be a pretty darn good cpu for gaming as well. But, depending on what settings your playing on, intel can have a big reach ahead in the gaming category due to its better IPC. Ryzen is a great all around chip, but if your a pure gamer, then intel should be your route and If you want a rig that will do great in gaming and great in heavy workloads while being more affordable then Ryzen is your chip. Theres no room for being biased when your wanting the best bang for your buck to suit your own needs.

Give us a few details on what you want out of the PC. Gaming purely, mixed, playing 1080P,1440,4k? and a rough budget for us to go on ^_^

Hello!

 

Thanks for you reply and I agree, that's why I thought I should ask more people about the opinion because it just didn't fit well with me that I should totally abandon Intel and not consider it this time as told by the guy.

What I want out of my PC is both gaming and to handle workload such as rendering 3D Models/Sculpts/Texturing work that I do.

I don't have any reason to switch to anything more than 1080P, I forgot to mention that my monitor is Dell S2240L, a 21.5" 1080p IPS Screen and I'm happy with it still.

I'm not going 1440p or 4K for quite some time. That's why I stuck with GTX 780 all this while.

My budget would be about 65-67k in Rs. so that's around 1000 in USD.

 

The websites that I prefer using to order parts :

www.primeabgb.com

www.mdcomputers.in

www.vedantcomputers.com

 

Anything found on these sites for me would be great.

There's Amazon.in as well but typically prices there are way high than the websites I mentioned above.

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with kaby lake, ryzen was better for workstation tasks but now with coffee lake 8700k being 6 core 12 thread, ryzen isnt really a consideration unless you want it or need the extra threads, most of the time people dont and would happily trade 2 cores for an extra gigahert and vastly superior ipc, if youre gaming at 1080p, 8700k will win, 1440p less of a difference and at 4k the difference is minimal, seeing as youre planning on rocking the 780, id imagine youll be playing 1080p

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https://pcpartpicker.com/list/YwJyjc

Heres a rough list of what you could potentially get out of a new PC for that money. The 8600k does great for gaming and pretty darn good for some heavy workloads as well, where not quite as good for multitasking as an R7 chip can be, it definately has a bigger jump in the gaming department and should do just fine in other areas.

If you can re use some of the parts from your old build, it can become even cheaper letting you jump up to better parts. The watercooler you have should work with 1151 socket, your power supply should do just fine, and you could reuse your old case if its unable to function anymore. Saving on these can either get you into an 8700k, or can get you more RAM, whichever you feel you would need more. Also if you resell your old parts, you could up the GPU As well.

 

 

Heres an example of what you can expect out of the high end CPU's. Take a look at all the benchmarks and see what you think and choose which one you like the best. Once you decide, i or others, can build you a parts list to your liking. At the end of the day, its whatever you like most ^_^

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8 minutes ago, Trulop said:

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/YwJyjc

Heres a rough list of what you could potentially get out of a new PC for that money. The 8600k does great for gaming and pretty darn good for some heavy workloads as well, where not quite as good for multitasking as an R7 chip can be, it definately has a bigger jump in the gaming department and should do just fine in other areas.

If you can re use some of the parts from your old build, it can become even cheaper letting you jump up to better parts. The watercooler you have should work with 1151 socket, your power supply should do just fine, and you could reuse your old case if its unable to function anymore. Saving on these can either get you into an 8700k, or can get you more RAM, whichever you feel you would need more. Also if you resell your old parts, you could up the GPU As well.

 

 

Heres an example of what you can expect out of the high end CPU's. Take a look at all the benchmarks and see what you think and choose which one you like the best. Once you decide, i or others, can build you a parts list to your liking. At the end of the day, its whatever you like most ^_^

The list does look cool enough but I'll surely go with Intel Core i7 8700K if I'm upgrading my CPU, I don't want to cut any corners there.

And because next year, I do think that in the mid 2018 or by the end of it, I'll be upgrading my GPU, I imagine it's better if I just upgrade my PSU as well now?

So with me just needing a good Motherboard, RAM and PSU to go for, I think it'll be great with that, and then I'll try and resell my parts that I won't use, soon enough when I find any buyer.

 

So what would you suggest me for these mentioned parts?

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personally i like this board

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813119033&cm_re=asus_rog_strix_z370_gaming_e-_-13-119-033-_-Product

This is also a good and popular board:

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157792

 

But there are many great others you can get for cheaper if you need to budget. AsRock makes some nice boards for around 150$ Do not buy low end gigabyte boards lol the only one i will personally recommend is the Aorus Gaming 7. For cheaper boards, there are much better ones from Asus or Asrock that will be much more reliable.

For PSU, heres a good one: a corsair CXM should work fine as well. try and get a 600+W for some good headroom.

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438054

 

For RAM there could be a ton of options. Depends on what speed, timings, budget, aesthetic and other things you may want out of it. Id go for around the 3000+ MHz area, and for your kind of work, 16gb minimum (get 2x8gb stick so you can expand later if you need to for any reason).

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233849

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820232476

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820236038

Heres a few options to look at. You can get crazy with the RGB factor if you want to, or just stick with the basics and get plain ram. If you want to find RAM thats been tested to work, check the Motherboards QVL after you choose one, and look in the speed ranges you want, and just search them until you find one you like the best for a good price. 

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17 minutes ago, Trulop said:

personally i like this board

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813119033&cm_re=asus_rog_strix_z370_gaming_e-_-13-119-033-_-Product

This is also a good and popular board:

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157792

 

But there are many great others you can get for cheaper if you need to budget. AsRock makes some nice boards for around 150$ Do not buy low end gigabyte boards lol the only one i will personally recommend is the Aorus Gaming 7. For cheaper boards, there are much better ones from Asus or Asrock that will be much more reliable.

For PSU, heres a good one: a corsair CXM should work fine as well. try and get a 600+W for some good headroom.

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438054

 

For RAM there could be a ton of options. Depends on what speed, timings, budget, aesthetic and other things you may want out of it. Id go for around the 3000+ MHz area, and for your kind of work, 16gb minimum (get 2x8gb stick so you can expand later if you need to for any reason).

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233849

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820232476

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820236038

Heres a few options to look at. You can get crazy with the RGB factor if you want to, or just stick with the basics and get plain ram. If you want to find RAM thats been tested to work, check the Motherboards QVL after you choose one, and look in the speed ranges you want, and just search them until you find one you like the best for a good price. 

Thanks for you help!

 

Under the budget that I've set, the parts you mentioned, might not be possible exactly, like the Z370-E is expensive so I'm thinking that I should go with Asus Prime Z370-A instead?

 

For the RAM, how does this one seem?

https://www.amazon.in/dp/B015FY3BJ2/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_1?pf_rd_p=cd818f9c-142a-4b42-ad2c-f0421857aaf5&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B0143UM4TC&pf_rd_m=A1VBAL9TL5WCBF&pf_rd_r=YJXDWD58J1QS1AS3FAT9&pf_rd_r=YJXDWD58J1QS1AS3FAT9&pf_rd_p=cd818f9c-142a-4b42-ad2c-f0421857aaf5

 

And now for the PSU, the EVGA ones weren't something I could find in here, so what about this one? -

https://www.primeabgb.com/online-price-reviews-india/cooler-master-storm-edition-gx750-rs-750-acaa-b3-power-supply/

or

https://www.primeabgb.com/online-price-reviews-india/corsair-rm650x-650w-fully-modular-power-supply-cp-9020091-uk/

or

https://www.primeabgb.com/online-price-reviews-india/cooler-master-v750-750w-modular-power-supply-rs750-afbag1-uk/

 

My question when choosing PSU is, what actually do I need? If I'm going to go with the specs above + keeping in mind that I'm going to upgrade to a new GPU next year,

The upcoming NVIDIA Volta GPUs, whatever the flagship may be in place of 1080Ti, I want to know if the PSU will be sufficient for it?

If my CX600W would be sufficient for the specs, I wouldn't think about upgrading the PSU then but I highly doubt it since people have been asking me to upgrade the PSU or giving me shit for choosing this one in first place, they all made it seem like I need RM850 or higher. I really don't know how the PSU thing too much so I always get confused if I'm making the right choice or not.

 

Looking forward to hearing from you and hopefully you'll help me clear out the doubts.

 

The budget so far exceeds 65000 and goes up to 71500 but I think I'll have to collect some more if I need a new PSU. I don't want to go with anything less than 8700K or the mentioned RAM (at least 3000MHz) and the one I found was 3200 MHz for lesser price than most of the 3000MHz ones.

I could try and look for an even cheaper motherboard if that doesn't affect anything. The PRIME Z370-A is about 16,500 Rs. here, if I get something else like

Asus Z370-P then it would cost about 12500 or so.

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Most Asus boards are pretty solid so you should be fine with anything with good reviews from the public.

Heres a couple other recommendation:

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157788&cm_re=z370-_-13-157-788-_-Product

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157789&cm_re=z370-_-13-157-789-_-Product

Both boards should work fine for overclocking and have some key features that make it a bit future proof and give you some options if you decide to add to it later.

 

The trident Z is great RAM, and alot of people use it. If you want to save money on RAM, cutting down to the 2800+ range would work fine, and G.Skill, hyperX, Corsair all offer some cheaper variants at the cost of some higher timings if you need to budget more, But if you can afford it, those Trident Z's are great ^_^

 

As for the power supply, honestly the one you have is decent. Sure there are definitely better ones, but its not like its the worst one you could find and if needed, you could use it for a while before needing to upgrade to save a few bucks if needed. Without overclocking, even a good 450-500w PSU would work, but for overclocking the snot out of parts, sometimes you can pull much more than you would think depending on certain variables and what your doing. Giving yourself ample headroom is always a good thing, so if max power draw overclocked is around 450-500W+, then id go with a 600+ PSU to make sure your not getting to your maximum output. So pretty much, a lot of people recommend the corsair CMX series power supplies, i like EVGA ones (a few of the lower tier ones have some slight issues) but most are pretty solid compared to budget PSU's. With getting a high tier system and spending a good amount of money, i advise a 80+ gold tier supply and something that has good ratings at the least. Theres some good sites online to see tested comparisons of good PSU's for different budgets if you want to see a bunch of options. Its safe to say a 650+ will do everything you need it to do so id aim for around there =P Hope this helps a bit!

 

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15 hours ago, Trulop said:

Most Asus boards are pretty solid so you should be fine with anything with good reviews from the public.

Heres a couple other recommendation:

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157788&cm_re=z370-_-13-157-788-_-Product

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157789&cm_re=z370-_-13-157-789-_-Product

Both boards should work fine for overclocking and have some key features that make it a bit future proof and give you some options if you decide to add to it later.

 

The trident Z is great RAM, and alot of people use it. If you want to save money on RAM, cutting down to the 2800+ range would work fine, and G.Skill, hyperX, Corsair all offer some cheaper variants at the cost of some higher timings if you need to budget more, But if you can afford it, those Trident Z's are great ^_^

 

As for the power supply, honestly the one you have is decent. Sure there are definitely better ones, but its not like its the worst one you could find and if needed, you could use it for a while before needing to upgrade to save a few bucks if needed. Without overclocking, even a good 450-500w PSU would work, but for overclocking the snot out of parts, sometimes you can pull much more than you would think depending on certain variables and what your doing. Giving yourself ample headroom is always a good thing, so if max power draw overclocked is around 450-500W+, then id go with a 600+ PSU to make sure your not getting to your maximum output. So pretty much, a lot of people recommend the corsair CMX series power supplies, i like EVGA ones (a few of the lower tier ones have some slight issues) but most are pretty solid compared to budget PSU's. With getting a high tier system and spending a good amount of money, i advise a 80+ gold tier supply and something that has good ratings at the least. Theres some good sites online to see tested comparisons of good PSU's for different budgets if you want to see a bunch of options. Its safe to say a 650+ will do everything you need it to do so id aim for around there =P Hope this helps a bit!

 

It sure does help a lot understanding it all! Thanks a lot, sire.

 

Another question, what if I go with a single stick of Ram instead of two of 8GB ones? Because for some reason, the single stick is a bit cheaper than the pack of two 8's

So is there any benefit to going with the two sticks?

 

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2 minutes ago, Satish Suthar said:

It sure does help a lot understanding it all! Thanks a lot, sire.

 

Another question, what if I go with a single stick of Ram instead of two of 8GB ones? Because for some reason, the single stick is a bit cheaper than the pack of two 8's

 

Essentially running 2 sticks of RAM lets you populate each channel on your motherboard. Out of the 4 slots, there is A 1 and 2, and B 1 and 2. If you populate both channels at once (whether thats 2 sticks, A-1 and B-1, or all 4 slots) it should theorhetically double your RAM acess bandwidth on your PC. Some RAM modules at certain speeds are more stable in 2-4 stick variants as well which could mean better stability and headroom for overclocking RAM. Running a single stick works just fine in most cases and alot of people do that in budget builds, but for a high end build like your building, id go for the 2-4 stick options.

Also to find out which slots are channels A or B, check your motherboards manual and it will tell you which is which.

For a much more in depth explanation, heres a video =P

 

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32 minutes ago, Trulop said:

Essentially running 2 sticks of RAM lets you populate each channel on your motherboard. Out of the 4 slots, there is A 1 and 2, and B 1 and 2. If you populate both channels at once (whether thats 2 sticks, A-1 and B-1, or all 4 slots) it should theorhetically double your RAM acess bandwidth on your PC. Some RAM modules at certain speeds are more stable in 2-4 stick variants as well which could mean better stability and headroom for overclocking RAM. Running a single stick works just fine in most cases and alot of people do that in budget builds, but for a high end build like your building, id go for the 2-4 stick options.

Also to find out which slots are channels A or B, check your motherboards manual and it will tell you which is which.

For a much more in depth explanation, heres a video =P

 

So now I'm thinking that I should invest more to get better RAM and Motherboard, and keep the PSU that I already have CX600W.

Next year, whenever I decide to upgrade to the new Volta GPU, I'll then try and get a better PSU that time, saving that money this time would mean that I could invest more in these better components because as you said, my CX600W is sufficient right now

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Just now, Satish Suthar said:

So now I'm thinking that I should invest more to get better RAM and Motherboard, and keep the PSU that I already have CX600W.

Next year, whenever I decide to upgrade to the new Volta GPU, I'll then try and get a better PSU that time, saving that money this time would mean that I could invest more in these better components because as you said, my CX600W is sufficient right now

That sounds like a pretty solid idea. Your PSU should do just fine lasting til then, and making sure the backbone (motherboard) and RAM of your PC can keep up with everything you throw at it would be best to start with as a foundation. Maybe hold off on overclocking for now to not put any extra stress on the PSU that you dont need for now, since your specs should do more than fine at stock anyways ^_^

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1 minute ago, Trulop said:

That sounds like a pretty solid idea. Your PSU should do just fine lasting til then, and making sure the backbone (motherboard) and RAM of your PC can keep up with everything you throw at it would be best to start with as a foundation. Maybe hold off on overclocking for now to not put any extra stress on the PSU that you dont need for now, since your specs should do more than fine at stock anyways ^_^

Yep! And I haven't actually overclocked anything since I've been running i7 4770K, because I didn't ever think much about overclocking, about how much it would affect the performance for me and if it's worth it when there is a boost.

I've been running everything on stock anyway :D

But sure, this time when I get a better PSU next year, I'll try and overclock that time if it's worth it for me, but I'm fairly certain I don't need to do any of them crazy stuff anytime soon.

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I would get a coffeelake I7k. 

Former Bronze Contributor 

CPU: Intel i7-7700K 4.2 GHz / CPU Cooler: Cryorig H7  / Board: ASRock Z270 Taichi / GPU: Nvidia 1060 6gb EVGA SC / GPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken G12 with Thermaltake Water 3.0 120mm RAM: White Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB DDR4 2666 MHz SSD: 2x Samsung 850 Evo 250 and 3TB WD blue HDD / PSU: Corasir 550cx / Case: NZXT s340 Elite White 

 

Im a super Italian. Kapish.

 

 

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On 11/1/2017 at 3:47 PM, ImNotThere said:

with kaby lake, ryzen was better for workstation tasks but now with coffee lake 8700k being 6 core 12 thread, ryzen isnt really a consideration unless you want it or need the extra threads, most of the time people dont and would happily trade 2 cores for an extra gigahert and vastly superior ipc, if youre gaming at 1080p, 8700k will win, 1440p less of a difference and at 4k the difference is minimal, seeing as youre planning on rocking the 780, id imagine youll be playing 1080p

 

On 11/1/2017 at 3:30 PM, Trulop said:

Wow thats a bummer because your pc should still work absolutely great  even by todays standards. I hope that you can get it fixed! 

For a new build, what are you going to be doing with it mainly? Honestly whoever told you to disregard intel is a bit full of it, there are good things to be had from both sides in different price ranges. Ryzen gets you into great multitasking workloads for very affordable pricing, and can be a pretty darn good cpu for gaming as well. But, depending on what settings your playing on, intel can have a big reach ahead in the gaming category due to its better IPC. Ryzen is a great all around chip, but if your a pure gamer, then intel should be your route and If you want a rig that will do great in gaming and great in heavy workloads while being more affordable then Ryzen is your chip. Theres no room for being biased when your wanting the best bang for your buck to suit your own needs.

Give us a few details on what you want out of the PC. Gaming purely, mixed, playing 1080P,1440,4k? and a rough budget for us to go on ^_^

 

20 hours ago, Douglas The Duck said:

I would get a coffeelake I7k. 

 

So I got something to discuss with ya people, the guy I mentioned who suggested me the Ryzen 1700, told me that in the work that I do, which is 3D Modeling and Sculpting all that stuff, the Ryzen is better and then he threw numbers and benchmarkings at me :

https://www.anandtech.com/show/11859/the-anandtech-coffee-lake-review-8700k-and-8400-initial-numbers/8

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-coffee-lake-i7-8700k-cpu,5252-10.html

 

To tell me that Ryzen's better here and he followed up by saying, "coffeelake as of now is not a very good choice since intel didnt come out with the mainstream chipset they only have the Z370 out just to mint money TBH this was a kneejerk response to ryzen"

 

So I pointed out that the processors shown in the benchmarks are 1700X and mostly 1800X and not 1700, his response to that was, " 1700x And 1700 are same... And with the stock cooler you can emulate the 1800x easily"

 

How much truth does that hold? Or as Trulop said, he's full of it? I do get a feeling that the guy must be biased but I wouldn't know for sure from the way he talks, only you could tell me since you guys are hardcore techies, I'm not.

 

As much as I do game, which is quite a lot, I still work more, so I want an overall choice that could help me do both at ease.

I just decided to order i7 8700K + ROG STRIX Z370-E + Ripjaws TridentZ 16gb (8x2) 3200 MHz tonight but I want to make sure that I'm going with the right decision before I make any payment. As soon as any of you guys help me get the numbers on what's best for me or debunk what the guys says, I'll be at ease.

 

Edit : To add, I know that the Intel pulls ahead in gaming for sure, but when it comes to work, is there a significant difference saying that Ryzen will be a better choice?

If Ryzen's (1700) profit in workload is more than the profit of Intel's gaming then I'd go with Ryzen. If Intel's performance in gaming is more than Ryzen's in workload then I'd go for that.

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Well, screw it I think I found the answer after some digging, the i7 8700K is at a huge advantage when it comes to gaming, compared to even 1800X and then when it comes to rendering and other performances, they're pretty similar with 1800X only pulling slightly better in results, so that huge advantage I see in gaming isn't worth the very slight advantage I noticed in 1800X and I can't even afford 1800X, which means 1700 has to be lower than that. Also it says that 8700K overclocks better, so I'll make the order tonight and expect the products to arrive in a few days!

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17 minutes ago, Satish Suthar said:

 

 

 

So I got something to discuss with ya people, the guy I mentioned who suggested me the Ryzen 1700, told me that in the work that I do, which is 3D Modeling and Sculpting all that stuff, the Ryzen is better and then he threw numbers and benchmarkings at me :

https://www.anandtech.com/show/11859/the-anandtech-coffee-lake-review-8700k-and-8400-initial-numbers/8

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-coffee-lake-i7-8700k-cpu,5252-10.html

 

To tell me that Ryzen's better here and he followed up by saying, "coffeelake as of now is not a very good choice since intel didnt come out with the mainstream chipset they only have the Z370 out just to mint money TBH this was a kneejerk response to ryzen"

 

So I pointed out that the processors shown in the benchmarks are 1700X and mostly 1800X and not 1700, his response to that was, " 1700x And 1700 are same... And with the stock cooler you can emulate the 1800x easily"

 

How much truth does that hold? Or as Trulop said, he's full of it? I do get a feeling that the guy must be biased but I wouldn't know for sure from the way he talks, only you could tell me since you guys are hardcore techies, I'm not.

 

As much as I do game, which is quite a lot, I still work more, so I want an overall choice that could help me do both at ease.

I just decided to order i7 8700K + ROG STRIX Z370-E + Ripjaws TridentZ 16gb (8x2) 3200 MHz tonight but I want to make sure that I'm going with the right decision before I make any payment. As soon as any of you guys help me get the numbers on what's best for me or debunk what the guys says, I'll be at ease.

 

Edit : To add, I know that the Intel pulls ahead in gaming for sure, but when it comes to work, is there a significant difference saying that Ryzen will be a better choice?

If Ryzen's profit in workload is more than the profit of Intel's gaming then I'd go with Ryzen. If Intel's performance in gaming is more than Ryzen's in workload then I'd go for that.

as stated, the ipc and clock speed advantage that intel has will outweigh the 2 core deficit from 1700 to 8700k in almost all programs, ryzen naturally runs cooler but has its niches

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1 minute ago, ImNotThere said:

as stated, the ipc and clock speed advantage that intel has will outweigh the 2 core deficit from 1700 to 8700k in almost all programs, ryzen naturally runs cooler but has its niches

Thank you, Hibana. R6 Operator to the rescue!

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Both CPU's will deliver great results in heavy tasks. Sure the Ryzen might pull ahead a bit in certain things due to having 2 more cores and 4 more threads, but in most scenarios, when the 8700k is overclocked to at least 4.8, the things that it does lose to the ryzen with, arent usually too great in difference. the things with R7's, is that a 1700 could effectively overclock to the exact same speeds as an 1800X, making it pretty much identical. However, buying a 1700x gets you higher stock speeds, and sometimes an ever so slight chance of getting a higher max OC (the range is usually in the 3.8-4.0 for all R7's if you get a decent chip) and the 1800x comes out of the box able to turbo to the 4.0 mark, making overclocking not necessary to reach the same goal. They each have their own pro's and con's, but i would still say overall the 8700k is probably the better chip as a whole. Anything that likes higher clock speeds paired with better IPC will love it, anything that favors more cores and threads, it will still come close to the R7 or even trade off. Ryzen builds can also be a bit more fickle with overclocking, RAM stability, ETC.

That being said, R7 is nothing to sneeze at. it offers great gaming performance, and awesome heavy workload performance. As you saw in the video i posted, the comparisons in gaming are pretty far in difference, but Ryzens average FPS was still at very high and playable levels. Ryzen builds can be a bit more fickle with overclocking, RAM stability, ETC.

 

Looking at those tests, you can see how close the i7 comes, if not beating the Ryzen as well which doesnt help his claim =P by the way, i love AMD. i would love to be able to recommend their products, but i cannot do that when its not necesarilly the best option as we all must be unbiased to better help the community. 

 

In the end its your PC. I can only give you the tools to help you come to a decision through benchmarks and data, and i or others, can help you build a draft of a good build for either platform =P

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1 hour ago, Trulop said:

Both CPU's will deliver great results in heavy tasks. Sure the Ryzen might pull ahead a bit in certain things due to having 2 more cores and 4 more threads, but in most scenarios, when the 8700k is overclocked to at least 4.8, the things that it does lose to the ryzen with, arent usually too great in difference. the things with R7's, is that a 1700 could effectively overclock to the exact same speeds as an 1800X, making it pretty much identical. However, buying a 1700x gets you higher stock speeds, and sometimes an ever so slight chance of getting a higher max OC (the range is usually in the 3.8-4.0 for all R7's if you get a decent chip) and the 1800x comes out of the box able to turbo to the 4.0 mark, making overclocking not necessary to reach the same goal. They each have their own pro's and con's, but i would still say overall the 8700k is probably the better chip as a whole. Anything that likes higher clock speeds paired with better IPC will love it, anything that favors more cores and threads, it will still come close to the R7 or even trade off. Ryzen builds can also be a bit more fickle with overclocking, RAM stability, ETC.

That being said, R7 is nothing to sneeze at. it offers great gaming performance, and awesome heavy workload performance. As you saw in the video i posted, the comparisons in gaming are pretty far in difference, but Ryzens average FPS was still at very high and playable levels. Ryzen builds can be a bit more fickle with overclocking, RAM stability, ETC.

 

Looking at those tests, you can see how close the i7 comes, if not beating the Ryzen as well which doesnt help his claim =P by the way, i love AMD. i would love to be able to recommend their products, but i cannot do that when its not necesarilly the best option as we all must be unbiased to better help the community. 

 

In the end its your PC. I can only give you the tools to help you come to a decision through benchmarks and data, and i or others, can help you build a draft of a good build for either platform =P

Yeah, I came to the conclusion, thanks again!

I'm going with i7 8700K  in the end. <3

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So there's good news to this whole thing!

I've managed to extend my budget a little (I can now add a PSU to the list!!!) and now my list of products that I have ordered are :

 

Processor : Intel Core i7 8700K

Motherboard : Asus ROG Strix Z370-E Gaming

Memory/RAM : G.Skill Trident Z RGB - 16GB (8GBX2) DDR4 3200MHz

PSU : Corsair RM850X

 

Thanks to everyone in the thread for your help! I'm pretty confident about everything in the end and now I could also manage to add a PSU to the list so that's also checked from the list finally! Next year, I'm just gonna upgrade my GPU it seems and get a larger size of SSD.

 

Finally, I'd like to state that this is going to be my first ever assembling the computer myself when I get the parts in a few days, lol, I hope I don't screw anything up, but I'm not nervous, I'm excited at the moment. My current computer was built in the store by the guys there when I got it locally in a different city I lived in.

I think I'll spend these next few days studying as much as I can to ensure I assemble everything perfectly.

 

However, there's couple of other questions :

1. With my cooler's stock fans on the radiator and one stock exhaust fan in rear and one 200mm stock fan in the front, what should be the recommended airflow directions for these? Currently, my radiator fans are taking the air in, rear one is exhaust and the front one is also taking the air inside, not exhausting it.

 

1. Now that I'm getting the parts and soon going to upgrade my PC, I'd like for you guys to suggest some fans for the cooling, I'd like to replace the two fans on my H100i GTX, because I heard that the stock fans provided by Corsair aren't that great if you want to cool down everything to the maximum, in case if that is true.

Current exhaust fan is a stock 120mm one and in the front there's a 200mm fan that came pre-installed as well with my case

My case : CM 690 III http://www.coolermaster.com/case/mid-tower-cm690-series/cm693/

I want to replace all of these stock fans with something better.

It would take a little time before I could do that, I'll probably do it in the next two months.

 

@Trulop @ImNotThere

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18 hours ago, Satish Suthar said:

So there's good news to this whole thing!

I've managed to extend my budget a little (I can now add a PSU to the list!!!) and now my list of products that I have ordered are :

 

Processor : Intel Core i7 8700K

Motherboard : Asus ROG Strix Z370-E Gaming

Memory/RAM : G.Skill Trident Z RGB - 16GB (8GBX2) DDR4 3200MHz

PSU : Corsair RM850X

 

Thanks to everyone in the thread for your help! I'm pretty confident about everything in the end and now I could also manage to add a PSU to the list so that's also checked from the list finally! Next year, I'm just gonna upgrade my GPU it seems and get a larger size of SSD.

 

Finally, I'd like to state that this is going to be my first ever assembling the computer myself when I get the parts in a few days, lol, I hope I don't screw anything up, but I'm not nervous, I'm excited at the moment. My current computer was built in the store by the guys there when I got it locally in a different city I lived in.

I think I'll spend these next few days studying as much as I can to ensure I assemble everything perfectly.

 

However, there's couple of other questions :

1. With my cooler's stock fans on the radiator and one stock exhaust fan in rear and one 200mm stock fan in the front, what should be the recommended airflow directions for these? Currently, my radiator fans are taking the air in, rear one is exhaust and the front one is also taking the air inside, not exhausting it.

 

1. Now that I'm getting the parts and soon going to upgrade my PC, I'd like for you guys to suggest some fans for the cooling, I'd like to replace the two fans on my H100i GTX, because I heard that the stock fans provided by Corsair aren't that great if you want to cool down everything to the maximum, in case if that is true.

Current exhaust fan is a stock 120mm one and in the front there's a 200mm fan that came pre-installed as well with my case

My case : CM 690 III http://www.coolermaster.com/case/mid-tower-cm690-series/cm693/

I want to replace all of these stock fans with something better.

It would take a little time before I could do that, I'll probably do it in the next two months.

 

@Trulop @ImNotThere

sp140/120's are great fans, 850w is a little overkill but its fine, positive pressure is reccomended, so have the 200mm as intake, 2 rad fans as intake and one exhaust fan, did you decide on a gpu yet?

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On 11/6/2017 at 5:16 PM, ImNotThere said:

sp140/120's are great fans, 850w is a little overkill but its fine, positive pressure is reccomended, so have the 200mm as intake, 2 rad fans as intake and one exhaust fan, did you decide on a gpu yet?

I was thinking about the SP120's too, I'm then thinking of going with performance edition for all, unless if it's not recommended to use performance on all.

I don't care about a bit of noise as long as the PC remains cool for me.

Should I keep the default 200mm fan in the front instead of changing it? I think it's slow and I don't know how much air does it bring in.

I could replace the front one with maybe Cooler Master MegaFlow 200mm or an SP140, whatever you recommend.

 

As for the GPU, I'm waiting for NVIDIA's next Volta series that I'll go for, next year. Whichever the flagship's going to be. I don't know much about AMD's card and how they're doing as of now, haven't heard much good about the Vega.

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