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High Refresh rate or Freesync/Gsync?

Go to solution Solved by Glenwing,
54 minutes ago, Hikaru12 said:

I guess to better phrase my question is screen tearing likely at high frame rates? I know at low frame rates you're more likely to get it as the monitor will likely be at a higher refresh rate than the card is putting out. 

Tearing is more common at higher framerates. Tearing happens when a new frame is produced while the monitor is in the middle of a refresh cycle. When the framerate is higher, new frames are being produced more often, and there are more opportunities for tearing to occur.

 

G-Sync and FreeSync don't operate above the refresh rate of the monitor, they only operate while below, so are beneficial at low framerates (where tearing is less common anyway). Tearing prevention is not the only purpose of G-Sync, and in fact it's not even the primary purpose, it's a secondary benefit. The main purpose of G-Sync is to improve smoothness at low framerates.

I've been looking at some 2560x1080 144hz monitors, so I know they're easy to drive. I don't expect many dips below 90-100fps with a 1070. Should I even bother caring about if it's GSync or Freesync? Freesync is pretty bad for being on spec and it's hard to know the range of each monitor without doing some heavy digging. Can I expect many screen tears at high framerates? 

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Hikaru12 said:

I've been looking at some 2560x1080 144hz monitors, so I know they're easy to drive. I don't expect many dips below 90-100fps with a 1070. Should I even bother caring about if it's GSync or Freesync? Freesync is pretty bad for being on spec and it's hard to know the range of each monitor without doing some heavy digging. Can I expect many screen tears at high framerates? 

 

 

 

I believe that NVidia does not support Freesync so if you're considering one, get a Gsync monitor.

Edit: Getting a Gsync compliant monitor should give you a far smoother experience if you dip below the advertised refresh rate of your monitor.

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the only purpose for gsync and freesync is to get rid of screen tearing - its literally just cosmetics for your gameplay

so if you really dont want to see tearing then yeah get gsync if you have a nvidia card

or get freesync if you have an amd card

 

or else just play with some screen tearing - we have been playing for decades with it

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29 minutes ago, mok said:

the only purpose for gsync and freesync is to get rid of screen tearing - its literally just cosmetics for your gameplay

so if you really dont want to see tearing then yeah get gsync if you have a nvidia card

or get freesync if you have an amd card

 

or else just play with some screen tearing - we have been playing for decades with it

I guess to better phrase my question is screen tearing likely at high frame rates? I know at low frame rates you're more likely to get it as the monitor will likely be at a higher refresh rate than the card is putting out. 

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Just now, Hikaru12 said:

I guess to better phrase my question is screen tearing likely at high frame rates? I know at frame rates you're more likely to get it as the monitor will likely be at a higher refresh rate than the card is putting out. 

I can't say much on the likely hood of tearing, however, Freesync and Gsync should solve this by making the monitor run at what your GPU is outputting.

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7 minutes ago, Hikaru12 said:

I guess to better phrase my question is screen tearing likely at high frame rates? I know at frame rates you're more likely to get it as the monitor will likely be at a higher refresh rate than the card is putting out. 

screen tearing is less noticeable at high refresh rates.

 

;(

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54 minutes ago, Hikaru12 said:

I guess to better phrase my question is screen tearing likely at high frame rates? I know at low frame rates you're more likely to get it as the monitor will likely be at a higher refresh rate than the card is putting out. 

Tearing is more common at higher framerates. Tearing happens when a new frame is produced while the monitor is in the middle of a refresh cycle. When the framerate is higher, new frames are being produced more often, and there are more opportunities for tearing to occur.

 

G-Sync and FreeSync don't operate above the refresh rate of the monitor, they only operate while below, so are beneficial at low framerates (where tearing is less common anyway). Tearing prevention is not the only purpose of G-Sync, and in fact it's not even the primary purpose, it's a secondary benefit. The main purpose of G-Sync is to improve smoothness at low framerates.

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