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Ram low voltage

No performance loss. it's still rated at 1866Mhz. Maybe looser timings, but it doesn't say.

 

but there's no reason to get low voltage RAM

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Delidded Core i7 4770K - GTX 1070 ROG Strix - 16GB DDR3 - Lots of RGB lights I never change

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What's the reason for low voltage RAM? This might be the first time I have ever seen anyone care about RAM voltage.

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Just now, Max_Settings said:

What's the reason for low voltage RAM? This might be the first time I have ever seen anyone care about RAM voltage.

mostly for low power HTPC or home server. 

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Just now, nerdslayer1 said:

mostly for low power HTPC or home server. 

How much power does RAM use?

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5 minutes ago, Cesar.gonz341 said:

So on my browsing for ram I came across on Amazon

 https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00J8E8ZWY/ref=mp_s_a_1_16?ie=UTF8&qid=1495332372&sr=8-16&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=ddr3+ram 

It's ram and give you a choice of low voltage ram and I was wondering how much performance I will lose for choosing low voltage 

low powered ram is usually used in laptops, allowing for longer battery life. the only reason to use it on a desktop were for an HTPC

i like trains 🙂

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Just now, Max_Settings said:

How much power does RAM use?

not much, it will depend on your setup, for a low powered HTPC or server, every bit counts. 

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26 minutes ago, Max_Settings said:

What's the reason for low voltage RAM? This might be the first time I have ever seen anyone care about RAM voltage.

Some Intel processors (I think 5th or 6th generation, Ivy Bridge or Skylake, I'm really not sure) that support both DDR3 and DDR4 depending on the motherboard and its chipset can only handle DDR3 memory sticks with voltage up to 1.35v

Basically, they designed the memory controllers for 1.2v (which is the standard DDR4 memory) but the circuits inside tolerate up to 0.15v above that voltage without being damaged in time.  So that's why they can handle DDR3  memory sticks with 1.35v voltage but can't handle DDR3 memory sticks with the default voltage of 1.5v

 

Here's an example, i5 6400 (6th Generation, Skylake) - scroll down to memory specification

 

For the same reasons on older Intel processors you could only use memory sticks that had voltage up to 1.65v - some circuitry in the memory controller was locked to 1.5v and therefore the processors could handle only 0.15v above 1.5v or 1.65v

 

AMD processors have no problems working with any memory stick, from 1.35v to 1.65v ... but they'll probably work best with the default 1.5v

 

25 minutes ago, Max_Settings said:

How much power does RAM use?

Probably about 2 watts for each memory stick. But it's not just about the the memory stick itself, the memory controller inside the processor also has to work at those higher voltages.

 

So if you can reduce the working voltage of the memory sticks you're not saving just a few tens of a watt on each memory stick but you're probably also saving half a watt or so inside the processor's memory controller circuitry which can add up along with other savings in different power saving modes to making a computer more silent or last a bit longer on battery.

 

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