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So I have been messing around with my 7700K. I seem to have a stable 1.2 VIN for 4.5GHz. However, I cannot seem to get past this barrier, even with 1.3 VIN for 4.7GHz. It only seems to achieve this speed when not under load (with intel speed step turned off). Whenever I run Prime95, the speed drops down to 4.4/4.3GHz or so. Is there something wrong? I am getting 75 celcius or so (with an air cooler) so I don't think temperature is the problem.

 

Any ideas why I'm not getting higher frequencies?

 

Thanks!

Current PC Rig: i7 7700K with Cryorig H7 || MSI Z270 Gaming Pro Carbon AC iTX || MSI GTX 1060 Gaming X 6GB || 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 2666MHz || 240GB Adata Premier SSD || 1TB WD Blue || EVGA 550GS || Phanteks Enthoo Evolv iTX || Dell U2715H

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What's your Load Line Calibration set to? I mean you're barely over stock speeds at 75C, and that doesn't seem right...

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31 minutes ago, Megah3rtz said:

Is turbo boost disabled? 

Yup, it's disabled. But it still slows down.

27 minutes ago, knightslugger said:

What's your Load Line Calibration set to? I mean you're barely over stock speeds at 75C, and that doesn't seem right...

I will check my BIOS when I get back. However, note that I'm running it on an air cooler (Cryorig H7) and it is Prime95 after all...

Current PC Rig: i7 7700K with Cryorig H7 || MSI Z270 Gaming Pro Carbon AC iTX || MSI GTX 1060 Gaming X 6GB || 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 2666MHz || 240GB Adata Premier SSD || 1TB WD Blue || EVGA 550GS || Phanteks Enthoo Evolv iTX || Dell U2715H

Laptop: Macbook Pro Late 2016 with Touch Bar (15inches): i7 2.GHz || 16GB RAM || 512GB Flash || Radeon Pro 460 4GB VRAM

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1 hour ago, spacemen13579 said:

So I have been messing around with my 7700K. I seem to have a stable 1.2 VIN for 4.5GHz. However, I cannot seem to get past this barrier, even with 1.3 VIN for 4.7GHz.

 

For clarification purposes, do you mean VID as opposed to VIN?  :D

 

1.3v Vcore is a slightly high voltage for a 4.7 GHz overclock.  Even with the latest Prime95 running a heavy AVX.  

 

Voltage is somewhat tied to temps.  The cooler you run the chip, potentially the lower the voltage you'll need to maintain the same load.   

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3 hours ago, done12many2 said:

 

 

For clarification purposes, do you mean VID as opposed to VIN?  :D

 

1.3v Vcore is a slightly high voltage for a 4.7 GHz overclock.  Even with the latest Prime95 running a heavy AVX.  

 

Voltage is somewhat tied to temps.  The cooler you run the chip, potentially the lower the voltage you'll need to maintain the same load.   

For stress testing in Prime95, which stress test should I run (e.g. blended, etc.)?

 

What is the difference between VID, VIN, and Vcore? In my bios, I set the Core Voltage, which one is this?

 

Sorry for all these questions, I'm new to the CPU overclocking scene. I've only ever overclocked GPUs.

 

Thanks.

Current PC Rig: i7 7700K with Cryorig H7 || MSI Z270 Gaming Pro Carbon AC iTX || MSI GTX 1060 Gaming X 6GB || 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 2666MHz || 240GB Adata Premier SSD || 1TB WD Blue || EVGA 550GS || Phanteks Enthoo Evolv iTX || Dell U2715H

Laptop: Macbook Pro Late 2016 with Touch Bar (15inches): i7 2.GHz || 16GB RAM || 512GB Flash || Radeon Pro 460 4GB VRAM

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1 hour ago, spacemen13579 said:

For stress testing in Prime95, which stress test should I run (e.g. blended, etc.)?

 

Do you know that you even need that level of testing?  I ask because most people don't.  The latest versions of Prime95 are great forms of stressing a system, but they place unrealistic loads on the CPU.  When I say excessive I'm specifically talking about the amount of power it causes to run across the CPU.  At higher overclocks/voltages this increases even more dramatically.

 

Put it this way, if you don't know what tests or custom configurations that you should run in Prime95, you more than likely do not have a need to actually run that type of testing.

 

Things like AIDA64 combined with several other tests will confirm that your system is plenty stable for gaming and almost all loads that you'll ever place on your CPU.

 

Quote

 

What is the difference between VID, VIN, and Vcore? In my bios, I set the Core Voltage, which one is this?

 

Core Voltage is the same thing as Vcore.  That is what you want to adjust.

 

VID is the voltage requested by the CPU and set by Intel during the manufacturing process.  Each CPU is tested during manufacturing and VID is programmed based on quality.

 

VCore is what is actually delivered to the CPU and is really all that matters.

 

Some platforms report VID and VCore separately, but in z170/z270, observed VID and VCore are one in the same when using fixed voltage. It changes when you switch to adaptive as VID is what the CPU receives in a non-turbo state and adaptive Vcore is what it receives when turbo is engaged.  Adaptive voltage can be further adjusted outside of VID when "+" or "-" offsets are used with adaptive mode.

 

In x99 for example, VID and VCore are not really the same.  VID in x99 is just what the CPU requests, but VCore is what it receives.

 

VIN??  Are you taking about VRIN?  If so, that is CPU input voltage and nothing to worry about on z170/z270.

 

Quote

 

Sorry for all these questions, I'm new to the CPU overclocking scene. I've only ever overclocked GPUs.

 

Thanks.

 

No worries.  It's good stuff to learn.

 

Good luck with the overclock.

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When you set core voltage in BIOS, you are giving the Voltage Regulataion Modules a target voltage to send to the CPU. However when CPUs go under load, the voltage the VRMs send drops considerably. This is called voltage droop. To combat this, VRMs employ what's called Load Line Calibration. What this basically does automatically increases the voltage the VRMs send to the CPU the moment it goes under load. This is critical to CPU stability. If the voltage droop falls too low, the system will crash and you will think you need to apply more voltage. Sometimes this is true, but it can also mean that your LLC is not compensating enough.

 

VID is what the CPU wants. the better you are able to get that voltage to the CPU from the VRMs, the more stable the OC will become, at least that's what I've found.

 

VCore is what the CPU gets from the VRMs. you will instantly see the results of LLC increasing or decreasing there.

 

What i have found, at least with my set up, is that LLC needs to be set to about 5 or 6 in order to combat the voltage droop i experience when the CPU is under load from Real Bench. What i also found was that when LLC was set to AUTO it was sending entirely too much voltage to the CPU and would frequently overheat. manually calibrating the line load was the answer to a stable 4.5GHz clock at a mild 1.325v with my 6700k system below. Your personal results may vary as each system is slightly unique.

 

Once you find that happy place, set your voltage from manual to adaptive and let the system run.

[FS][US] Corsair H115i 280mm AIO-AMD $60+shipping

 

 

System specs:
Asus Prime X370 Pro - Custom EKWB CPU/GPU 2x360 1x240 soft loop - Ryzen 1700X - Corsair Vengeance RGB 2x16GB - Plextor 512 NVMe + 2TB SU800 - EVGA GTX1080ti - LianLi PC11 Dynamic
 

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1 hour ago, knightslugger said:

When you set core voltage in BIOS, you are giving the Voltage Regulataion Modules a target voltage to send to the CPU. However when CPUs go under load, the voltage the VRMs send drops considerably. This is called voltage droop. To combat this, VRMs employ what's called Load Line Calibration. What this basically does automatically increases the voltage the VRMs send to the CPU the moment it goes under load. This is critical to CPU stability. If the voltage droop falls too low, the system will crash and you will think you need to apply more voltage. Sometimes this is true, but it can also mean that your LLC is not compensating enough.

 

VID is what the CPU wants. the better you are able to get that voltage to the CPU from the VRMs, the more stable the OC will become, at least that's what I've found.

 

VCore is what the CPU gets from the VRMs. you will instantly see the results of LLC increasing or decreasing there.

 

What i have found, at least with my set up, is that LLC needs to be set to about 5 or 6 in order to combat the voltage droop i experience when the CPU is under load from Real Bench. What i also found was that when LLC was set to AUTO it was sending entirely too much voltage to the CPU and would frequently overheat. manually calibrating the line load was the answer to a stable 4.5GHz clock at a mild 1.325v with my 6700k system below. Your personal results may vary as each system is slightly unique.

 

Once you find that happy place, set your voltage from manual to adaptive and let the system run.

 

1 hour ago, done12many2 said:

 

Do you know that you even need that level of testing?  I ask because most people don't.  The latest versions of Prime95 are great forms of stressing a system, but they place unrealistic loads on the CPU.  When I say excessive I'm specifically talking about the amount of power it causes to run across the CPU.  At higher overclocks/voltages this increases even more dramatically.

 

Put it this way, if you don't know what tests or custom configurations that you should run in Prime95, you more than likely do not have a need to actually run that type of testing.

 

Things like AIDA64 combined with several other tests will confirm that your system is plenty stable for gaming and almost all loads that you'll ever place on your CPU.

 

 

Core Voltage is the same thing as Vcore.  That is what you want to adjust.

 

VID is the voltage requested by the CPU and set by Intel during the manufacturing process.  Each CPU is tested during manufacturing and VID is programmed based on quality.

 

VCore is what is actually delivered to the CPU and is really all that matters.

 

Some platforms report VID and VCore separately, but in z170/z270, observed VID and VCore are one in the same when using fixed voltage. It changes when you switch to adaptive as VID is what the CPU receives in a non-turbo state and adaptive Vcore is what it receives when turbo is engaged.  Adaptive voltage can be further adjusted outside of VID when "+" or "-" offsets are used with adaptive mode.

 

In x99 for example, VID and VCore are not really the same.  VID in x99 is just what the CPU requests, but VCore is what it receives.

 

VIN??  Are you taking about VRIN?  If so, that is CPU input voltage and nothing to worry about on z170/z270.

 

 

No worries.  It's good stuff to learn.

 

Good luck with the overclock.

Thank you so much guys. This has been very informative. I'll see how my overclock goes :)

Current PC Rig: i7 7700K with Cryorig H7 || MSI Z270 Gaming Pro Carbon AC iTX || MSI GTX 1060 Gaming X 6GB || 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX 2666MHz || 240GB Adata Premier SSD || 1TB WD Blue || EVGA 550GS || Phanteks Enthoo Evolv iTX || Dell U2715H

Laptop: Macbook Pro Late 2016 with Touch Bar (15inches): i7 2.GHz || 16GB RAM || 512GB Flash || Radeon Pro 460 4GB VRAM

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