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Gigabit vs Gigabyte?

So i see how Cat6 has speeds of 10 GB/s, so how much megabytes is that. Also what is a difference between a gigabyte and gigabit. Like i saw a 10 gigabit ethernet, so does that mean it transfers 10 gigabytes per second? also i searched up on google, and a gigabit is 125 MB. HELP!

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Byte (with capital B) is 8 bits (with lowercase b). A Byte is traditionally the standard unit that holds a single character, whereas a bit has only two states: up or down.

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2 minutes ago, Apollo Refugio said:

So i see how Cat6 has speeds of 10 GB/s, so how much megabytes is that. Also what is a difference between a gigabyte and gigabit. Like i saw a 10 gigabit ethernet, so does that mean it transfers 10 gigabytes per second? also i searched up on google, and a gigabit is 125 MB. HELP!

Gigabyte is storage and gigabits is transfer speeds. 1 gigabit = 0.125 gigabytes

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10/8 = 1.25 Gigabytes per second

 

1 Byte = 8 Bits, like @Energycore said

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A gigabyte is 1000MB. A gigabit is 128MB. 

 

When something is advertised as being able to transfer at 10Gb(gigabits) per second, it is equivalent to 1.25GB/s. In megabytes, that would be about 1280MB/s. 

Something else to bear in mind is the meaning of the prefixes.

 

Giga means billion. When looking at the units "gigabyte" and "gigabit," the former is referring to one billion bytes, while the latter is referring to one billion bits, or 1s and 0s. 

Edited by Godlygamer23

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2 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

Gigabyte is storage and gigabits is transfer speeds. 1 gigabit = 0.125 gigabytes

They can both be used for transfer rate and storage. It's just a different way of representing the same thing: 1s and 0s. 

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Just now, Godlygamer23 said:

They can both be used for transfer rate and storage. It's just a different way of representing the same thing: 1s and 0s. 

I mean they are used to represent their respective things

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1 minute ago, Clanscorpia said:

I mean they are used to represent their respective things

I know, but they both work for both things. Just like kilometers per hour and miles per hour.

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Just now, Godlygamer23 said:

I know, but they both work for both things.

Ik

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3 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

Gigabyte is storage and gigabits is transfer speeds. 1 gigabit = 0.125 gigabytes

While it is generally true that Kilobit, Megabit and Gigabit are often used to represent network speeds, there isn't an actual distinction stating that Gigabyte is only used to refer to storage space and Gigabit is referring to transfer speed.  The distinction is made when capacity is followed by transfer rate of said capacity per unit time.  And of course it wouldn't make sense to state storage space in terms of bits since using bytes would be more efficient and make more sense.

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4 minutes ago, AkiraDaarkst said:

While it is generally true that Kilobit, Megabit and Gigabit are often used to represent network speeds, there isn't an actual distinction stating that Gigabyte is only used to refer to storage space and Gigabit is referring to transfer speed.  The distinction is made when capacity is followed by transfer rate of said capacity per unit time.  And of course it wouldn't make sense to state storage space in terms of bits since using bytes would be more efficient and make more sense.

Read the whole post before you reply lol 

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11 minutes ago, Apollo Refugio said:

So i see how Cat6 has speeds of 10 GB/s, so how much megabytes is that. Also what is a difference between a gigabyte and gigabit. Like i saw a 10 gigabit ethernet, so does that mean it transfers 10 gigabytes per second? also i searched up on google, and a gigabit is 125 MB. HELP!

1 Byte = 8 bits

A bit represents the "On" and "Off" or "True" and "False" state.  In computing it would be represented by a 1 or 0.

8 bits is required to represent 1 Byte because it is the minimum necessary to represent the primary characters of the English alphabet, the digits 0 to 9 and special characters like punctuation marks.  1 Byte or 8 bits can represent 256 characters (2 to the power 8).  Of course when taking into account characters and special symbols from other languages it is not enough.

 

4 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

Read the whole post before you reply lol 

My comment there was only in regards to your comment.

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Just now, AkiraDaarkst said:

1 Byte = 8 bits

A bit represents the "On" and "Off" or "True" and "False" state.  In computing it would be represented by a 1 or 0.

8 bits is required to represent 1 Byte because it is the minimum necessary to represent the primary characters of the English alphabet, the digits 0 to 9 and special characters like punctuation marks.  1 Byte or 8 bits can represent 256 characters (2 to the power 8).  Of course when taking into account characters and special symbols from other languages it is not enough.

 

My comment there was only in regards to your comment.

I meant I clarified

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28 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

I meant I clarified

 

29 minutes ago, AkiraDaarkst said:

1 Byte = 8 bits

A bit represents the "On" and "Off" or "True" and "False" state.  In computing it would be represented by a 1 or 0.

8 bits is required to represent 1 Byte because it is the minimum necessary to represent the primary characters of the English alphabet, the digits 0 to 9 and special characters like punctuation marks.  1 Byte or 8 bits can represent 256 characters (2 to the power 8).  Of course when taking into account characters and special symbols from other languages it is not enough.

 

My comment there was only in regards to your comment.

 

35 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

Read the whole post before you reply lol 

 

39 minutes ago, AkiraDaarkst said:

While it is generally true that Kilobit, Megabit and Gigabit are often used to represent network speeds, there isn't an actual distinction stating that Gigabyte is only used to refer to storage space and Gigabit is referring to transfer speed.  The distinction is made when capacity is followed by transfer rate of said capacity per unit time.  And of course it wouldn't make sense to state storage space in terms of bits since using bytes would be more efficient and make more sense.

 

39 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

Ik

 

40 minutes ago, Godlygamer23 said:

I know, but they both work for both things. Just like kilometers per hour and miles per hour.

 

41 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

I mean they are used to represent their respective things

 

41 minutes ago, Godlygamer23 said:

They can both be used for transfer rate and storage. It's just a different way of representing the same thing: 1s and 0s. 

 

42 minutes ago, Godlygamer23 said:

A gigabyte is 1000MB. A gigabit is 128MB. 

 

When something is advertised as being able to transfer at 10Gb(gigabits) per second, it is equivalent to 1.25GB/s. In megabytes, that would be about 1280MB/s. 

Something else to bear in mind is the meaning of the prefixes.

 

Giga means billion. When looking at the units "gigabyte" and "gigabit," the former is referring to one billion bytes, while the latter is referring to one billion bits, or 1s and 0s. 

 

44 minutes ago, wrathoftheturkey said:

10/8 = 1.25 Gigabytes per second

 

1 Byte = 8 Bits, like @Energycore said

 

44 minutes ago, Clanscorpia said:

Gigabyte is storage and gigabits is transfer speeds. 1 gigabit = 0.125 gigabytes

 

45 minutes ago, Energycore said:

Byte (with capital B) is 8 bits (with lowercase b). A Byte is traditionally the standard unit that holds a single character, whereas a bit has only two states: up or down.

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16 hours ago, Apollo Refugio said:

So i see how Cat6 has speeds of 10 GB/s, so how much megabytes is that. Also what is a difference between a gigabyte and gigabit. Like i saw a 10 gigabit ethernet, so does that mean it transfers 10 gigabytes per second? also i searched up on google, and a gigabit is 125 MB. HELP!

A byte is composed of 8 bits.

 

11000000

These 8 bits are a byte

 

1100000.10101000.00000001.00000001

The above string is 4 bytes that when converted to decimal is 192.168.1.1.

 

So bit to byte just multiply by 8.

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AAArgh...

 

Network speeds and data transfers work with bits.

Each bit can have only two states, either 0 or 1,  or "off" and "on".  For ease of writing and expressing yourself, people started to use KILO and MEGA and GIGA where kilo is 1000 and MEGA is 1000 KILO = 1.000.000  and GIGA  is 1000 MEGA (you get the point).

 

They stick with multple of bits because it's not always the case that the amount of data transferred is the same amount as what you store.

 

For example, a SATA cable can transfer data at up to 6 gbps or 6 billion bits per second, but by design for every 8 bits of actual infomation, ten bits go through the cable, the last two bits are added for error correction information (in case one of the bits gets corrupted as it goes through the cable, the sata controller on the motherboard can detect that by using those 2 extra bits and read those 8 bits again from the device at the other end).

So while the cable can transfer 6 gbps through it, actual data that could be used is just 80% of that or 4.8 gbps (which is 600,000,000 bytes or 600 MB / ~ 572 MiB)

On the same note, when data is transferred from the computer to a PCi-Express card, through a PCI-E v2.0 slot data is transferred in packets of 10 bits, where just 8 bits are actual data and 2 bits are error correction information - so while each lane has a maximum transfer speed of 5 GT (gigatransfers per second), you have only 500 MB/s.

On PCI-E v3.0, data is transferred in packets of 130 bits, where 128 bits are data and 2 bits are again error correction information and the number of transfers is raised to 8 GT/s which means each lane can achieve about 984.6 MB/s

 

Now, for storage, we're dealing with two different systems of multiplication. 

At the base of both, we have the BYTE, which on x86 architecture is made out of 8 bits.  The byte is the minimum quantity which can be stored somewhere.

From this point, we have

* the system where multiples of byte use 1000 and 1.000.000 and so on, which use the KILObyte, MEGAbyte, GIGAbyte.

* the system where multiples of 2 are used, which is easier for computers and operating systems :  2^10  = 1024 ( KibiBYTE) , 2^20 = 1024x1024 = MibiBYTE, 2 ^ 30 = 1024 MibiBYTE  = 1 GibiBYTE

 

Hard drive manufacturers wanted to show on labels big numbers so when they made drives, they wrote stuff  like 2.1 GB hard drive and at the bottom of the label they said "where 1 GB is 1 billion bytes". 

 

The operating systems however especially back then when computer memory was expensive, had to resort to various tricks in order to manage files and folders on hard drives without using a lot of memory. In order to do that, they organized the surface of the discs in units that were multiples of 2...  the minimum quantity of information that could be written on hard drive became 512 bytes (2^9) and then multiple sectors were grouped in units called clusters (for FAT32, you could have up to 128 sectors in a cluster, and you can see 128 is already a multiple of 2)

By using multiples of 2, the part of the operating system that handle file systems could use less bits to store information about each file and the operating system ran faster.

 

Anyway, because of this, operating systems used 1024 instead of 1000 when computing file sizes, so when you look a at a file's properties you may see the values as divided using 1024 but still writing MB or GB after the value, even through the proper terms should be MiB or GiB. That's because this MiB and GiB notation was standardized at a much later time, after people already got used to the idea of MB and GB. 

And because of this, you also see when you buy a 1 TB drive (1000 billion bytes) that after it's formatted it looks like a much smaller quantity - you see 1000 x 1000 x 1000 x 1000 bytes , but  /1024 = 976,562,500 KiB , /1024 = 953,674 MiB = 931.3 GiB

 

SSD drives also work with multiple of 2 by design, they work with 4096 byte units, grouped in 64 KB pages, grouped in larger units and so on. However, SSD manufacturers do the same as hard drive manufacturers and use 1000 instead of 1024, because this allows them to hide a few GB of flash memory from user, which is used as spare memory for when some flash memory cells start to age and no longer store data reliably. basically, they use that hidden portion of the SSD drives to extend the life of the drive and even to increase its performance

 

 

So conclusion, a  1 gbps network card can download 1.000.000.000 bits per second which is (divided by 8)  125,000,000 bytes per second. If we ignore the fact that a tiny part of that is used by each network card to control the transfer of information and just think it's a ideal world, this would mean that we'd store on a hard drive 125,000,000 bytes or 125 MB/s (in the sense hard drive manufacturers use) or  /1024 = 122,070 KiB or  119.20 MiB  (as you would see when you right click on a file and select Properties on it)

In real world, like I said, we're talking about maybe a few tens of KB/s of bandwidth being used by the two network cards to communicate between them, to acknowledge that data has arrived at the other end correctly, stuff like that.

 

10 gbps network cards do 10 times as much as a 1gbps card, it's that simple.

 

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gigabyte is a brand.

 

Network speeds are measured in bits not bytes. What a bit or byte is should be something taught in primary school along with arithmatics. The amount of people that cant differentiate what bandwidth and speed is, bits and bytes is huge and annoying.

 

If you read your own question, it said 10 gigabit, no way does it mean 10 gigabyte.

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2 hours ago, System Error Message said:

gigabyte is a brand.

 

Network speeds are measured in bits not bytes. What a bit or byte is should be something taught in primary school along with arithmatics. The amount of people that cant differentiate what bandwidth and speed is, bits and bytes is huge and annoying.

 

If you read your own question, it said 10 gigabit, no way does it mean 10 gigabyte.

I know about gigabyte as a brand, but I mean 10 gigabit as meaning it transfers 10 gigabytes of data. 

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If you had read my previous comment you would have learned already.

10gbps mean in a second 10 billion bits can come into the network card. Since a byte is made out of 8 bits, this means you have a theoretical maximum transfer speed of 1,250,000,000 bytes per second  ( 1250 MB/s or 1192 MiB/s )

 

And remember, pretty much any transfer involves some talking back and forth between computers to make sure the chunks of data are transferred correctly and if not, to re-transmit those chunk of data that were corrupted. This communication can use a tiny chunk of those 1250 MB/s but it's very small, less than 1%

 

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2 minutes ago, mariushm said:

If you had read my previous comment you would have learned already.

10gbps mean in a second 10 billion bits can come into the network card. Since a byte is made out of 8 bits, this means you have a theoretical maximum transfer speed of 1,250,000,000 bytes per second  ( 1250 MB/s or 1192 MiB/s )

 

And remember, pretty much any transfer involves some talking back and forth between computers to make sure the chunks of data are transferred correctly and if not, to re-transmit those chunk of data that were corrupted. This communication can use a tiny chunk of those 1250 MB/s but it's very small, less than 1%

 

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While it is true its the wire speed and others have noted what that means I wanted to also point out you wont be able to transfer at that speed. The reason is the protocol overhead which is a combination of the physical layer needs, TCP and IP needs over and above the bytes you send. Its actually about 25% or 10 bits = 1 byte of your data transferred.

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