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Front panel Power and HDD LED Voltages

Go to solution Solved by Quaker,
6 minutes ago, Vamprie said:

So my 2.3V LEDs should work?

All LEDs (and all diodes, for that matter) have a basic "junction voltage" which varies around 1.8 to 2.5 volts (or so). The limiting resistor is designed to limit the current through the diode to it's safe operating level. So, yes, they should work unless they are large LEDs designed for high current and high brightness.

I am thinking of changing out my stock power and HDD LEDs on two of my computers and I am wondering what the voltage coming out of the pins on the motherboards are. The motherboards in the computers are a MSI FM2-A75MA-E35 and a MSI Z170A PC MATE. Thankful for some answers! :) 

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The stock power and HDD LEDs usually run off the +5v rail. They also usually include a current limiting resistor on-board. Most average LEDs will work just fine, as the motherboard needs to be compatible with the common LEDs that come with various cases.

A sieve may not hold water, but it will hold another sieve.

i5-6600, 16Gigs, ITX Corsair 250D, R9 390, 120Gig M.2 boot, 500Gig SATA SSD, no HDD

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Just now, Electronics Wizardy said:

standard 20ma led power. About 3-3.5v

Thanks for the answer! So will i fry them if they are 2.3 V?

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1 minute ago, Quaker said:

The stock power and HDD LEDs usually run off the +5v rail. They also usually include a current limiting resistor on-board. Most average LEDs will work just fine, as the motherboard needs to be compatible with the common LEDs that come with various cases.

So my 2.3V LEDs should work?

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6 minutes ago, Vamprie said:

So my 2.3V LEDs should work?

All LEDs (and all diodes, for that matter) have a basic "junction voltage" which varies around 1.8 to 2.5 volts (or so). The limiting resistor is designed to limit the current through the diode to it's safe operating level. So, yes, they should work unless they are large LEDs designed for high current and high brightness.

A sieve may not hold water, but it will hold another sieve.

i5-6600, 16Gigs, ITX Corsair 250D, R9 390, 120Gig M.2 boot, 500Gig SATA SSD, no HDD

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Just now, Quaker said:

All LEDs (and all diodes, for that matter) have a basic "junction voltage" which varies around 1.8 to 2.5 volts (or so). The limiting resistor is designed to limit the current through the diode to it's safe operating level. So, yes, they should work unless they are large LEDs designed for high current and high brightness.

Okay thanks! I will try if they work :)

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1 minute ago, Electronics Wizardy said:

Probably, normally leds are current not voltage driven.

okay :)

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