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Are MVA monitors good?

brownninja97
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Im quite confused about a monitor im about to get and its MVA. Ive not heard of that before.

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They're pretty good, somewhat like IPS.

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MVA is a VA panel 

 

VA panel monitors tends to have better contrast ratios than IPS panel monitors. A high quality VA panel can have a static contrast ratio (more important than dynamic contrast ratio) of about 5000:1. But those are expensive high-end monitors. VA panels can typically do about 3000:1 whereas IPS panels can do 1000:1. The static contrast allows for better differentiation between color tones and reduces the chances of "black crush" where color tones that are very, very close to each other simply gets displayed as a single color tone, rather than 3 or 4 or how many actual color tones that are supposed to be displayed.

There's a lot of pros and con for VA and IPS monitors. The above example is a pro for VA and a con for IPS. But there are a lot of other factors. VA panels are more prone to gamma shifts while IPS panels are more prone to have white glow when they are viewed off angle. Both of which distorts colors, but in different ways.

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MVA is a variant of VA. VA is in between TN and IPS.

I agree but, I like to place MVA is in between TN and IPS. Not PVA.

Professional grade PVA panels (well, they are really only found there, in any case) are on par with IPS panels. both with strength and weaknesses.

For example, if one works with a lot of dark pictures, than PVA pro grade panel is the way to go. Response time is horrible on them, but it's for color critical work, not playing games.

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I agree but, I like to place MVA is in between TN and IPS. Not PVA.

Professional grade PVA panels (well, they are really only found there, in any case) are on par with IPS panels. both with strength and weaknesses.

For example, if one works with a lot of dark pictures, than PVA pro grade panel is the way to go. Response time is horrible on them, but it's for color critical work, not playing games.

Personally I would rate VA nearer to TN than IPS. Do you agree? Also I think VA has the deepest blacks.

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