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Looking to buy a server CPU - is low TDP worth it?

Hey guys,

 

We're looking to buy a media/storage PC, and originally were planning on getting the i3 6300T (35W TDP). I did some maths, which leans highly towards the non "low TDP" versions. Here is the chart:

 

E6Wgfri.png

So basically, how important is low TDP for server machines (24/7). Does it mean it will draw 85% more, whatever you are doing? Or is it just a limitation on the CPU so it cannot draw more than that. If you do the same task on a 6400T & 6400, will they draw similar wattage? Or will the 6400T be a lot more efficient. 8.5% increase cost for a 50% improvement seems like an easy choice (even the entry i5 is 30% for 4% extra).

 

Wondering what you guys think :) Any input on my build is appreciated as well (but not necessary)

 

Thanks a lot,

Clampy

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TDP isn't a measure of how much power it uses, it's a measure of the heat it outputs iirc (Thermal Design Power) Also, change the PSU in that build to something like a Seasonic or Superflower :P

USEFUL LINKS:

PSU Tier List F@H stats

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Hey guys,

 

We're looking to buy a media/storage PC, and originally were planning on getting the i3 6300T (35W TDP). I did some maths, which leans highly towards the non "low TDP" versions. Here is the chart:

 

E6Wgfri.png

So basically, how important is low TDP for server machines (24/7). Does it mean it will draw 85% more, whatever you are doing? Or is it just a limitation on the CPU so it cannot draw more than that. If you do the same task on a 6400T & 6400, will they draw similar wattage? Or will the 6400T be a lot more efficient. 8.5% increase cost for a 50% improvement seems like an easy choice (even the entry i5 is 30% for 4% extra).

 

Wondering what you guys think :) Any input on my build is appreciated as well (but not necessary)

 

Thanks a lot,

Clampy

You're making the general confusion.

TDP has zero correlation with wattage or power consumption, it's rather a measure of cooling and how much heat it can output.

But low TDP would still be nice for a 24/7 machine

                                                                                                                 Setup

CPU: i3 4160|Motherboard: MSI Z97 PC MATE|RAM: Kingston HyperX Blue 8GB(2x4GB)|GPU: Sapphire Nitro R9 380 4GB|PSU: Seasonic M12II EVO 620W Modular|Storage: 1TB WD Blue|Case: NZXT S340 Black|PCIe devices: TP-Link WDN4800| Montior: ASUS VE247H| Others: PS3/PS4

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snip-

 

This is not a very good server build...No ECC, gaming motherboard, etc. What do you want this server to do? I can suggest something based on your usage.

Hi! If you ever need some structural, mechanical or electrical design/build help on your new rig, send me a PM and ill try and help you out!

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Ah christ - that's right. Sorry, correct - I got mixed up. Leaning much more to the non T versions then - heat will be a non-issue.

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You're making the general confusion.

TDP has zero correlation with wattage or power consumption, it's rather a measure of cooling and how much heat it can output.

But low TDP would still be nice for a 24/7 machine

well. . . TDP isn't equal to power consumption, but there is a correlation. higher TDP parts consume more power, be it short bursts or continuous.

 

 

 

TDP is the average power consumption over an extended load, because given enough time to heat soak the parts, power consumed is equal to heat dissapated.

TDP doesn't take into account short bursts of high power consumption, as they don't have a significant contribution to the heat output.

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This is not a very good server build...No ECC, gaming motherboard, etc. What do you want this server to do? I can suggest something based on your usage.

 

It was actually recommended that I use a gaming board as a good compromise for price per quality (on reddit). It would be amazing if you could give me some recommendations.

 

It will basically sit on a shelf and run plex (local and moderately outside - so some transcoding). It will also be used to store data (I expect to expand the hard drives to 3 x WD Reds - which will then be backed up onto a NAS). The main focus is Plex though, and something that will last.

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TDP isn't a measure of how much power it uses, it's a measure of the heat it outputs iirc (Thermal Design Power) Also, change the PSU in that build to something like a Seasonic or Superflower :P

 

I have had incredibly good experiences with Corsair parts, so I am a bit biased in this regard. Anything specific you think would be better?

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It was actually recommended that I use a gaming board as a good compromise for price per quality (on reddit). It would be amazing if you could give me some recommendations.

 

It will basically sit on a shelf and run plex (local and moderately outside - so some transcoding). It will also be used to store data (I expect to expand the hard drives to 3 x WD Reds - which will then be backed up onto a NAS). The main focus is Plex though, and something that will last.

 

Ah ok, so you want to use this as a combo HTPC and local storage machine but not as a dedicated server.

 

In this application, you are not going to be overclocking or using multiple graphics cards, which are the only benefits of using a gaming motherboard (unless you are going with a certain aesthetic). I would recommend a business class board such as an ASUS B150 based board. 

Hi! If you ever need some structural, mechanical or electrical design/build help on your new rig, send me a PM and ill try and help you out!

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well. . . TDP isn't equal to power consumption, but there is a correlation. higher TDP parts consume more power, be it short bursts or continuous.

 

 

 

TDP is the average power consumption over an extended load, because given enough time to heat soak the parts, power consumed is equal to heat dissapated.

TDP doesn't take into account short bursts of high power consumption, as they don't have a significant contribution to the heat output.

Yeah I worded that badly, naturally CPU/GPUs with higher TDP naturally consume more power as they are hotter but you can't necessarily judge the power consumption from the TDP eg. 390 only consumes 60W more than 970 under load

                                                                                                                 Setup

CPU: i3 4160|Motherboard: MSI Z97 PC MATE|RAM: Kingston HyperX Blue 8GB(2x4GB)|GPU: Sapphire Nitro R9 380 4GB|PSU: Seasonic M12II EVO 620W Modular|Storage: 1TB WD Blue|Case: NZXT S340 Black|PCIe devices: TP-Link WDN4800| Montior: ASUS VE247H| Others: PS3/PS4

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Ah ok, so you want to use this as a combo HTPC and local storage machine but not as a dedicated server.

 

In this application, you are not going to be overclocking or using multiple graphics cards, which are the only benefits of using a gaming motherboard (unless you are going with a certain aesthetic). I would recommend a business class board such as an ASUS B150 based board. 

 

Yea correct - no graphics cards, just using the APU. Can you get those boards in a mATX? Looking for a small form factor (mATX or mITX for the Air 240). Looking myself as well of course :)

 

EDIT: I found 4 from ASUS

B150M-C
B150M-PLUS
B150M-K
B150M-D
 
I'm gonna look into them - thanks a lot :)
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