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Monitor refresh rates

haseebuchiha

Does having a high end gaming pc but a 60hz monitor have any side effects. Is there like screen tearing or stuttering if the monitor is not 144hz or something?

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It will happen at any refresh rate, but more unlikely at higher ones.

So if i get a 60hz tv instead of a monitor is there any difference?

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So if i get a 60hz tv instead of a monitor is there any difference?

Probably just ppi, so from closer it will look worse. I use 60hz and its fine. You can always use vsync if it becomes a problem.

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Does having a high end gaming pc but a 60hz monitor have any side effects. Is there like screen tearing or stuttering if the monitor is not 144hz or something?

You only have tearing, only if your game runs higher than 60fps with your 60Hz monitor (1Hz = 1fps), and you have V-sync turned off.

Most gamers are fine with V-Sync. But if you are a competitive FPS player, and you got to have your gamer keyboard, gamer mouse, gamer chair, gamer monitor, gaming printer (might as well be next), then the input lag that V-Sync causes can be annoying.

One can argue that 60Hz can be better for gaming TODAY than 144Hz. No no no, not "cinematic" none sense. Hear me out, because it does have point. If you play games non competitively, but rather for fun/entertainment, and you see games as an art, and you want those game to shine visually, especially AAA title games, you need some SERIOUS power to drive games at 120-144 fps continuously at max settings. At 60fps experience, with powerful hardware, you can play games at max or near max settings and really enjoy the hard work that the graphics designer spent on the game, and really get the best visuals out of your games. At 60Hz, you can find some really nice, and affordable IPS monitors, even true 8-bit panels IPS monitors for better color reproduction, and really enjoying your game visuals, instead of opting for a TN panel with washed out colors. I mean what is the point of running the game at max settings if everything looks like crap because the monitor can't do a better job at displaying the image.

So, in other words:

-> If you care about visuals/art style of the game, than IPS 60Hz is a great choice of monitor. You'll really play games that you'll really enjoy those higher graphical settings, something you can get as you only need to the game at 60fps.

-> If you do competitive gaming, or you are just a competitive player, and the heck with graphics, then a 144Hz monitor TN monitor will do the trick, in any case you'll need to play your games at medium settings to be able to take full advantage of the monitor refresh rate.

-> Yes, you can run games at 60fps on a 144Hz monitor. No problem there. But you are not really taking full advantage of the monitor abilities, something to consider as 144Hz isn't really the same time as a 60Hz one. (Although you can enjoy 75-90Hz with it, without tearing, with V-Sync off, something you can't get with a 60Hz. Basically, it depends on you, on how you value things).

-> Yes, they are 144Hz IPS monitors. But they aren't cheap, and I think there is like 1 or 2 manufacture that has it, and uses the same panel. Cost a lot more, great if you can afford it, you get to enjoy both best colors and 60Hz+ experience.

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You only have tearing, only if your game runs higher than 60fps with your 60Hz monitor (1Hz = 1fps), and you have V-sync turned off.

Most gamers are fine with V-Sync. But if you are a competitive FPS player, and you got to have your gamer keyboard, gamer mouse, gamer chair, gamer monitor, gaming printer (might as well be next), then the input lag that V-Sync causes can be annoying.

One can argue that 60Hz can be better for gaming TODAY than 144Hz. No no no, not "cinematic" none sense. Hear me out, because it does have point. If you play games non competitively, but rather for fun/entertainment, and you see games as an art, and you want those game to shine visually, especially AAA title games, you need some SERIOUS power to drive games at 120-144 fps continuously at max settings. At 60fps experience, with powerful hardware, you can play games at max or near max settings and really enjoy the hard work that the graphics designer spent on the game, and really get the best visuals out of your games. At 60Hz, you can find some really nice, and affordable IPS monitors, even true 8-bit panels IPS monitors for better color reproduction, and really enjoying your game visuals, instead of opting for a TN panel with washed out colors. I mean what is the point of running the game at max settings if everything looks like crap because the monitor can't do a better job at displaying the image.

So, in other words:

-> If you care about visuals/art style of the game, than IPS 60Hz is a great choice of monitor. You'll really play games that you'll really enjoy those higher graphical settings, something you can get as you only need to the game at 60fps.

-> If you do competitive gaming, or you are just a competitive player, and the heck with graphics, then a 144Hz monitor TN monitor will do the trick, in any case you'll need to play your games at medium settings to be able to take full advantage of the monitor refresh rate.

-> Yes, you can run games at 60fps on a 144Hz monitor. No problem there. But you are not really taking full advantage of the monitor abilities, something to consider as 144Hz isn't really the same time as a 60Hz one. (Although you can enjoy 75-90Hz with it, without tearing, with V-Sync off, something you can't get with a 60Hz. Basically, it depends on you, on how you value things).

-> Yes, they are 144Hz IPS monitors. But they aren't cheap, and I think there is like 1 or 2 manufacture that has it, and uses the same panel. Cost a lot more, great if you can afford it, you get to enjoy both best colors and 60Hz+ experience.

 

While I see what you are aiming at with what you mentioned, I think the thought process is askew.... This is from someone who has been using 120Hz panels since inception as well as korean IPS 60Hz panels(and 130Hz Catleap 2B for that matter) since the korean panel "craze" several years back (thanks green-sum), just because you have a 144Hz panel, does not mean you HAVE to be hitting 143+ fps, which is why I think what you mentioned doesn't quite make sense. I say this because quite simply, even if you are getting 50 - 100 fps and not touching 143, you will still find a smoother experience on the 144Hz panel without adjusting ANY graphical settings and being able to leave VSync off for a more raw input feel. Sure, I do play CSGO regularly as well as other fast paced FPS titles where raw input is very important, but vsync, even if slightly, makes mouse movement pretty damn horrid. The only decent alternatives are G-Sync or FreeSync.

 

Now, if you happen to be running super duper awesome overkill setup that does 143+ fps, then if you have an NV card and a 144Hz panel that supports ULMB, you can get an even better and smoother experience! I run a single 980Ti, so more than half the time ULMB is just ever-so slightly out of my reach when cranking up the graphics, but oh well, SLI is not something I am keen on.

 

 

Don't take this post as a, "oh hey, you really need to go buy a 144Hz/165Hz panel RIGHT NOW", just look at what you gain from it if you have the opportunity. My personal view on the whole 144/165Hz thing is more of, if you primarily play RTS/RPG titles, while there may be a smoother game offered with the higher Hz monitors, 60Hz will be just fine, whereas the biggest difference IMO is with FPS titles (particularly faster paced ones). My opinion is more of, while it can certainly be of benefit, you have to weight the cost against the pros/cons with the biggest con being the added cost of paying for 144Hz+.

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While I see what you are aiming at with what you mentioned, I think the thought process is askew.... This is from someone who has been using 120Hz panels since inception as well as korean IPS 60Hz panels(and 130Hz Catleap 2B for that matter) since the korean panel "craze" several years back (thanks green-sum), just because you have a 144Hz panel, does not mean you HAVE to be hitting 143+ fps, which is why I think what you mentioned doesn't quite make sense. I say this because quite simply, even if you are getting 50 - 100 fps and not touching 143, you will still find a smoother experience on the 144Hz panel without adjusting ANY graphical settings and being able to leave VSync off for a more raw input feel. Sure, I do play CSGO regularly as well as other fast paced FPS titles where raw input is very important, but vsync, even if slightly, makes mouse movement pretty damn horrid. The only decent alternatives are G-Sync or FreeSync.

I said, to take FULL advantage of the 144Hz.

Juts to push the discussion.

Also, you want consistent fps experience. If fluctuate between 60 and 100fps, nothing will be smooth. You'll see the stepping. You want the most consistent performance out of a game for the best/ultimate visual experience. And that is another problem with review sites that shows fps of games. They use Fraps which only does an average fps. Or if they use something else that get them the true min, max, and avg that is good, but you don't know if it fluctuate 100fps and 10fps continuously making the game unplayable, or steady 100fps, with the casual 10fps here and there when the game loads the level.

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