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Network incapable of >100mbps, despite no limitations?

Aprils_Renegade

Hey all,

 

I'm currently on an ISP that provides us <75mpbs (their highest package). I've been considering moving to another ISP for their 200mbps package, and I wanted to ensure every step of my network can support this upgrade.

 

I have an Asus RT-N66U, from which I run a CAT6 cable to a powerline adapter, that's capable of 200mbps. On the other end, I run a Cat5e cable into my motherboard (Z87-A) which has a RealTek Gigabit controller on-board. According to this, I should be capable of 200+mbps in anticipation, however when I go to check my adapter's settings, it reports a speed of 100mbps. Why is this? Is this because my ISP isn't providing greater than 100, so it doesn't appear?

 

 

"If an Opportunity doesn't knock, build a Door." - Milton Berle

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The jacks on the PC, router and the PC's adapter configurations is what determines the speed once the ISP and nodes on the poles or under the street done mess up.

 

The jacks must be 10/100/1000 and the adapter should be in auto negotiation or at full 1.00Gbps full duplex.

A water-cooled mid-tier gaming PC.

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The "200Mbps" on the powerline adaptor is misleading for two reasons. First, they are telling you the combined throughput of the system - powerline, like wifi, is half duplex, meaning you can communicate in both directions, but only one direction at a time- and they are just telling you that the maximum it could achieve over the powerline link is 200Mbps. Second, every 200Mbps powerline adaptor I've seen so far actually only has 100Mbps ethernet connections. Ethernet doesn't offer any speed in between 100 and 1000 Mbps. You have to step up to 500Mbps or faster powerline adaptors to get gigabit ports. While you're at it, I would recommend getting an adaptor rated for AV2, which is a substantial improvement over the AV standard used on 500Mbps and slower models.

Looking to buy GTX690, other multi-GPU cards, or single-slot graphics cards: 

 

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I'd really just try to run a dedicated line. I've never really liked powerline networking... plus then you'll be up to Gb access

I would if I could. I'm in a seperate floor to the router, so I have no choice but to use powerline.

"If an Opportunity doesn't knock, build a Door." - Milton Berle

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I would if I could. I'm in a seperate floor to the router, so I have no choice but to use powerline.

drop it through the wall. Many people are too afraid to do this kind of work, but it is not terribly difficult.

ESXi SysAdmin

I have more cores/threads than you...and I use them all

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drop it through the wall. Many people are too afraid to do this kind of work, but it is not terribly difficult.

 

This. Assuming you own the building or can get permission from the appropriate person (or just don't think your landlord will notice or care) it really is an easy process.

 

You can get everything you'll need from Home Depot for under $20 excluding your CAT-5e cable ($18 for 100' from HD, or cut to length from an online place, I don't think HD has it on the cut to length spools).

 

I recommend:

2x Low-Voltage Old work Brackets

2x Keystone Wall Plates

2x Keystone CAT-5e Jacks

1x Sheetrock Saw

 

When dropping the wire through the wall either put the jack near enough to an existing outlet that you can feed the Cat5 through next to the power line, or place the jack low enough that you can reach a drill in to make a hole in the sill plate to feed the wire. Cut both holes first using the brackets as a template (check your hole size in a piece of cardboard first for best results) then drop your wire before putting the brackets in so you can fit your hand in the hole to fish it out of the wall. Termination of those keystone jacks is easy with the included tool, and you can punch to either color standard listed on the jack (makes no difference) as long as you do them both the same way! (A to A or B to B, but A to B won't work properly)

 

The wall brackets and faceplates are pretty forgiving as well, making it easy to fudge them to be plumb and square even if you miscut the hole a bit. Plus if you need to take it out later you can just put a blank plate over the hole and leave it.

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