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My school's Internet is being secured by WPA-2 Personal

danielsuarez369

Here the catch. I managed to get my hands on my high school's wifi password. But as they warned us. Each time you try to connect to their wifi even if you have the password, they have to "allow" it at the office. What do they mean by that? And more importantly, is there a way around it?

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It's called Per Station Access (on my router at least) and no, there is no way around it.

It means that as you try to connect the router will add your IP & MAC to an access list which the admin has to allow before you get internet access.

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Here the catch. I managed to get my hands on my high school's wifi password. But as they warned us. Each time you try to connect to their wifi even if you have the password, they have to "allow" it at the office. What do they mean by that? And more importantly, is there a way around it?

They are most likely using a MAC address filter. Essentially the hard coded address on your network adapter. So you may be able to connect but if your MAC isn't on the list of allowed ones, you're not going anywhere.

 

I won't encourage anything but there are ways to change your MAC address however that is all I'm going to say. Stay safe out there.

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Sorry for my presumably ignorance, But, Will a VPN help me here?

In most cases, no - just about every system will either block you at the wireless network controller (preventing you from finishing the wireless connection) or at the internet gateway (preventing all traffic between you and the internet). A vpn wouldn't be able to connect in either case.

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They are most likely using a MAC address filter. Essentially the hard coded address on your network adapter. So you may be able to connect but if your MAC isn't on the list of allowed ones, you're not going anywhere.

I won't encourage anything but there are ways to change your MAC address however that is all I'm going to say. Stay safe out there.

So in theory if I can get into a computer with a IP address and a MAC address that has been allowed in the network, and I change my IP address and MAC address to that, it should work? Am I correct?

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So in theory if I can get into a computer with a IP address and a MAC address that has been allowed in the network, and I change my IP address and MAC address to that, it should work? Am I correct?

 

Completely depends on the wireless setup. Simply changing to a static IP address of one you know is allowed won't do anything, changing the MAC Address might if the secondary authentication step is MAC Address Authentication.

 

Enterprise wireless systems have controllers which handle authentication, authorization and firewalling. If the wireless system does not authorize you in to the network having an IP will do nothing, it does not trust you so will block you. Also at some point you'll just end up with a conflicting IP of another wireless client and your device will automatically get blacklisted.

 

If you are getting blocked to things you would find useful in your education or would like less restriction during break times the better option would be to ask if this could be done. Most often things are block by categories controlled by the company that makes the firewall, IT staff don't actually know specifically what sites are blocked as there are way to many to possibly know that. They can override individual sites that are being blocked by a category, very easy and quick to do.

 

If you are just bored and want to waste time on the internet at the expense of others and the internet bandwidth maybe you just need a swift kick :P School sucks, we all hated it or at least some subjects. Grin and bare it like everyone else, it does end. Learning to do things you don't like is a great life lesson that is required in the work place.

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So in theory if I can get into a computer with a IP address and a MAC address that has been allowed in the network, and I change my IP address and MAC address to that, it should work? Am I correct?

Aside from the excellant answer right above this one, if both devices were online and claiming the same MAC and/or IP, neither would have an internet connection because the network would constantly be switching which one it sent packets and frames too (the switching protocal in the switches and APs and the routing protocal in the gateway would think that this single device keeps jumping very quickly from one location to another). Eventually you would get caught by someone investigating on behalf of the other user, and/or if the system is set to detect rapid changes in the forwarding table (Cisco switches can log this, and I'm sure others can too)

Looking to buy GTX690, other multi-GPU cards, or single-slot graphics cards: 

 

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