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Best CPU to pair with GTX 750 ti

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Im looking to build a new PC however I cannot decide on the CPU.

The pc will be a beginners starter pc that I will upgrade later so I don't need ultimate power, and have chosen a gtx 750 ti as the graphics card.

What would be the best CPU to pair with that.

Should I go with a pentium. I have been told that this is enough for the GPU I have. (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/82723/Intel-Pentium-Processor-G3258-3M-Cache-3_20-GHz)

Another option is a i3. (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/77480/Intel-Core-i3-4130-Processor-3M-Cache-3_40-GHz)

Or a i5 (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/80811/Intel-Core-i5-4690K-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_90-GHz)

Or any other CPU's that you could recommend.

Any help is appreciated.

You would have been better off buying better parts from the start as you'll only end up spending more in the long term than what you would have if you had bought higher end parts from the start. Having said that if you don't need overclocking and you don't think you'll be doing anything intensive with the system I would say get the i3, you'll get decent performance from it, and having the hyper threading will keep it relevent for longer compared to the G3258, and you'll have a decent upgrade path when you do decide it isn't enough any more.

If you wish to overclock then get the i5 if you can afford it, yes the system will be unbalanced, but if you get a G3258 you'll find that some games you wish to play won't work on anything less than an i3, the Pentium is great for messing around with and learning how to overclock but I wouldn't say it's worth using as a daily driver any more unless you're on an ultra tight budget.

It's up to you at the end of the day though, if you cannot afford the i5 then get the i3 until you can afford something better, if you're not concerned with performance, and you're on a tight budget and you know for definite that you'll never play anything that needs 4 cores then get the Pentium, but just temper your expectations a little, it's a great overclocker, but it's a dual core and dual cores are fast being left behind as software takes better advantage of multithreading, and I would argue that it is already obsolete for most use cases.

Im looking to build a new PC however I cannot decide on the CPU.

The pc will be a beginners starter pc that I will upgrade later so I don't need ultimate power, and have chosen a gtx 750 ti as the graphics card.

What would be the best CPU to pair with that.

Should I go with a pentium. I have been told that this is enough for the GPU I have. (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/82723/Intel-Pentium-Processor-G3258-3M-Cache-3_20-GHz)

Another option is a i3. (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/77480/Intel-Core-i3-4130-Processor-3M-Cache-3_40-GHz)

Or a i5 (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/80811/Intel-Core-i5-4690K-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_90-GHz)

Or any other CPU's that you could recommend.

Any help is appreciated.

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An i3 would pair up with it nicely, but an i5 would be better for future upgrades. For the GPU, I would get an r9 270 if it is around the same price as a 750ti for you, and your PSU can power it.

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I would get an I5 as you wont need to upgrade your cpu+mobo for ages.

An AMD cpu has no place in a solely gaming build, end of.

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What do you want to do with it?

 

If it's gaming basically any of those 3 cpu's will do as the gpu becomes the bottleneck very quickly. If you want to do cpu intensive workloads though the story becomes different.

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I would definitly recommend the Pentium G3258. You can easily overclock it and it costs absolutly nothing.
And you got a nice socket for later upgrades. You can upgrade to any i5 and i7 4th gen CPU such as the i5-4690k and the i7-4790k which are currently still the best performing quad core CPUs.

Edit: You can of course also get an i5 now and you don't have to worry about upgrading for a pretty long time.

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Well it's better to get the i5, so you can just upgrade the GPU later.

i3 is still good though, not saying that i3 is bad.

For Pentium, still enough for GTX 750Ti but if you're doing pretty heavy work then you should get i3 instead, at least.

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i3 or a pentium overclocked or an fx 6 core *grabs popcorn*

Details separate people.

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A pentium is enough, but some games don't like dual cores so get a i3.

That is still a dual core CPU.

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That is still a dual core CPU.

Just wanted to say the same. pentium and i3 both are dual core. i5 is 4 core and i7 is 6 core (depends on the model)

I have a r9 270 paired with the fx 6300 and its working pretty well. The only game my cpu bottlenecks is bf4

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You can pair a 750ti with almost anything without bottlenecking. Core 2 quad? Sure. AMD FX? Why not it's a 750 ti. An i3 would be a great CPU to pair with it, although the i3 can probably do more with a better graphics card. Also don't ever buy the 750 ti ever forever never ever. For like $40 more you can get an R9 280 which is so much ridiculously better. Or you could get a 270 which is still better, and it costs less

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Im looking to build a new PC however I cannot decide on the CPU.

The pc will be a beginners starter pc that I will upgrade later so I don't need ultimate power, and have chosen a gtx 750 ti as the graphics card.

What would be the best CPU to pair with that.

Should I go with a pentium. I have been told that this is enough for the GPU I have. (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/82723/Intel-Pentium-Processor-G3258-3M-Cache-3_20-GHz)

Another option is a i3. (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/77480/Intel-Core-i3-4130-Processor-3M-Cache-3_40-GHz)

Or a i5 (E.G http://ark.intel.com/products/80811/Intel-Core-i5-4690K-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_90-GHz)

Or any other CPU's that you could recommend.

Any help is appreciated.

You would have been better off buying better parts from the start as you'll only end up spending more in the long term than what you would have if you had bought higher end parts from the start. Having said that if you don't need overclocking and you don't think you'll be doing anything intensive with the system I would say get the i3, you'll get decent performance from it, and having the hyper threading will keep it relevent for longer compared to the G3258, and you'll have a decent upgrade path when you do decide it isn't enough any more.

If you wish to overclock then get the i5 if you can afford it, yes the system will be unbalanced, but if you get a G3258 you'll find that some games you wish to play won't work on anything less than an i3, the Pentium is great for messing around with and learning how to overclock but I wouldn't say it's worth using as a daily driver any more unless you're on an ultra tight budget.

It's up to you at the end of the day though, if you cannot afford the i5 then get the i3 until you can afford something better, if you're not concerned with performance, and you're on a tight budget and you know for definite that you'll never play anything that needs 4 cores then get the Pentium, but just temper your expectations a little, it's a great overclocker, but it's a dual core and dual cores are fast being left behind as software takes better advantage of multithreading, and I would argue that it is already obsolete for most use cases.

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Thanks, I will take all the answers into consideration when building my PC! Thanks

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