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Why are there no good OLED monitors?

I mean we have 4k oled Tvs and plenty of oled smartphones, but I have yet to hear about an oled monitor. I know that in the past oleds were susceptible to burn-in, but most newer panels dont really show any at all.

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Its still a maturing tech so it'll probably be a little while before we see it in monitors due to the higher demands of their users vs. phones and TVs.

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I mean we have 4k oled Tvs and plenty of oled smartphones, but I have yet to hear about an oled monitor. I know that in the past oleds were susceptible to burn-in, but most newer panels dont really show any at all.

OLED has significant burn in if it is showing a constant image for too long. on TV's, there is almost never a constant image, so this isn't an issue. on a phone, you don't use the display for more than a few hours per day, and not too much of what you view is constant, so considering the average smartphone life cycle is 2-3 years, some burn in is acceptable.

on a computer, the monitor may run for 12+ hours in a day, most of the screen never changes (like the taskbar and that red X in the corner) so you would have severe burn in, which would be completely unacceptable as most people keep monitors for 5 years or more.

 

TL:DR, screen burn in would be significant, much more severe than smartphones or TVs

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most people my age don't remember this, but burn in used to be pretty common on CRT computer monitors, which is why screen savers were important, and aptly named, as they prevented burn in of static images like the task bar and icons etc.

if you had an OLED monitor, and it was used for a desktop environment, you would need to have the display shut off when not in use or you would need a screen saver.

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most people my age don't remember this, but burn in used to be pretty common on CRT computer monitors, which is why screen savers were important, and aptly named, as they prevented burn in of static images like the task bar and icons etc.

if you had an OLED monitor, and it was used for a desktop environment, you would need to have the display shut off when not in use or you would need a screen saver.

 

Get your facts straight. Burn in for OLED was a problem a few years ago. Any new oleds made today are almost immune. I say "almost" because you need to have a static picture on it for a week to get some burn in.

 

 

@ OP

 

Look at it this way:

few years ago you could get a 30" 1080p OLED for 30000$

nowadays you can get a 55" 4k OLED for 4800$

 

We have come far. Just a few more years before we start getting OLED monitors. And the thing about OLED monitors is:

 

A Few words on response time:
ALL LCD`s have around 10ms pixel response time. That "1ms gtg" advertised is the fastest color shift (grey to grey) measurement under heavy overdrive. All other color shifts are only worse under that heavy overdrive. And if you even used that much overdrive you would have clearly visible bright inverse ghosting going on.
 
BUT: the three technologies which are in fact GOOD for enjoying motion are:
 
CRT = 0ms pixel response time for ALL color shifts equally
DLP (projector) = 1ms pixel response time for ALL color shifts equally
OLED = 0.01ms pixel response time for ALL color shifts equally
 
Since CRT burns eyes and is too small and dead. And since OLED is way too expensive. The best way to enjoy motion right now is in fact a DLP projector.
 
So, if you combine OLED with adaptive sync with a range from 0-120hz you get a 100% artifact free and flicker free display with the best possible angles, colors and blacks.
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Get your facts straight. Burn in for OLED was a problem a few years ago. Any new oleds made today are almost immune. I say "almost" because you need to have a static picture on it for a week to get some burn in.

 

look at the bottom of your monitor. that taskbar that you see is a static image. burn in is not caused by a continuous image one time, burn in is caused by an image that is shown for a large part of the display panels life, due to how LEDs reduce in brightness over time, relative to how long they have been lit up, and how brightly.

if your computer is on, for 10 hours per day, for 6 years (about how long I seem to keep monitors) that adds up to 130 weeks of the taskbar being lit up constantly. that's certainly enough to cause some burn in.

I do agree with you in that burn in is improving, my mother's droid charge from 4 ish years ago had horrendous burn in. her Note 3 and my S4 are better, but still have some burn in, that is most visible on gray backgrounds. even my friend's S5 and my brother's Note 4 have some burn in, which are only 14 and 6 months old respectively.

the Note 4's display is among the best OLED displays on the market, and is not yet a year old, but still has some discernable burn in. if that can burn in of it's notification bar and app icons, then the taskbar and other consistent elements on a computer would certainly cause burn in within a few years.

 

if this wasn't a problem, I'm almost certain we'd see computer monitors in OLED already, but as for now, they are used for displays that don't get as much screen on time, or have a consistent image played through it's life.

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look at the bottom of your monitor. that taskbar that you see is a static image. burn in is not caused by a continuous image one time, burn in is caused by an image that is shown for a large part of the display panels life, due to how LEDs reduce in brightness over time, relative to how long they have been lit up, and how brightly.

if your computer is on, for 10 hours per day, for 6 years (about how long I seem to keep monitors) that adds up to 130 weeks of the taskbar being lit up constantly. that's certainly enough to cause some burn in.

I do agree with you in that burn in is improving, my mother's droid charge from 4 ish years ago had horrendous burn in. her Note 3 and my S4 are better, but still have some burn in, that is most visible on gray backgrounds. even my friend's S5 and my brother's Note 4 have some burn in, which are only 14 and 6 months old respectively.

the Note 4's display is among the best OLED displays on the market, and is not yet a year old, but still has some discernable burn in. if that can burn in of it's notification bar and app icons, then the taskbar and other consistent elements on a computer would certainly cause burn in within a few years.

 

if this wasn't a problem, I'm almost certain we'd see computer monitors in OLED already, but as for now, they are used for displays that don't get as much screen on time, or have a consistent image played through it's life.

 

Fuck. Your right.

 

Slightly shattered my OLED dreams. Kinda fooled myself into thinking there`d be OLED monitors in 2-3 years.

 

At least burn in is slowly getting better...  

Cuz i dont want to live in a world where we NEVER get OLED monitors xD

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Fuck. Your right.

 

Slightly shattered my OLED dreams. Kinda fooled myself into thinking there`d be OLED monitors in 2-3 years.

 

At least burn in is slowly getting better...  

Cuz i dont want to live in a world where we NEVER get OLED monitors xD

I'd say we'll have practical OLED computer monitors within 5 years. countering burn in would be possible by showing a bright image that was an inversion of each pixel's average output for the day, so that every subpixel would burn in evenly

really though, for practicality they need to fix burn in, which difficult with this pesky thing called entropy.

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