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Microsoft just made millions from Windows XP

there's still a huge customer base using Windows XP and they're willing to dole out millions of dollars for custom security support. The latest customer to sign a Windows XP support deal is the US Navy. On Tuesday, the Navy's Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) closed a $9.1 million contract with Microsoft that guarantees continued custom support for security updates on the 100,000 workstations still using Windowx XP, Office 2003, Exchange 2003, and Windows Server 2003.
The full contract could extend to 2017, and be worth up to $30.8 million. The Navy relies on a number of legacy applications and programs that are reliant on legacy Windows products. Until those applications and programs are modernized or phased out, this continuity of services is required to maintain operational effectiveness.

 

 

 
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And yet a few European (French, German, Spanish) & the chinese governments have moved to linux . . . .

And I really doubt they are saving ANY money by doing that. Because you still need a company to develop linux.

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And yet a few European (French, German, Spanish) & the chinese governments have moved to linux . . . .

you can't really do that if your missile guidance system works on Linux. As stated it's all in the legacy software. And belive me there is a fuck ton of that still around.

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you can't really do that if your missile guidance system works on Linux. As stated it's all in the legacy software. And belive me there is a fuck ton of that still around.

like how the US nukes still rely on 8 inch floppies lol

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And yet a few European (French, German, Spanish) & the chinese governments have moved to linux . . . .

Linux Support is actually just as - if not even more - expensive compared to Windows Support.

 

That's one of the reasons why the major Linux Distros can offer a free version, is because Support Contracts cost extra, where they are included with the cost of Windows/Windows Server.

 

Not to mention good Linux SysAdmins are costly to employ.

 

Linux isn't "magically free" for corporations/governments/government agencies. Sure, there's no upfront purchase cost, but there are a ton of other costs many people don't think about.

 

For starters, the cost of retraining 100,000 people to use Linux - most of which, have probably never touched a Linux computer in their life (Not counting Android, since it's so fundamentally different on the UI side of things). Next you've got the support contract, the cost of employing good specialized Linux IT personnel, etc.

 

In the grand scheme of things, the cost Linux vs Microsoft for a corporation, isn't really very different.

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Linux Support is actually just as - if not even more - expensive compared to Windows Support.

 

That's one of the reasons why the major Linux Distros can offer a free version, is because Support Contracts cost extra, where they are included with the cost of Windows/Windows Server.

 

Not to mention good Linux SysAdmins are costly to employ.

 

Linux isn't "magically free" for corporations/governments/government agencies. Sure, there's no upfront purchase cost, but there are a ton of other costs many people don't think about.

 

For starters, the cost of retraining 100,000 people to use Linux - most of which, have probably never touched a Linux computer in their life (Not counting Android, since it's so fundamentally different on the UI side of things). Next you've got the support contract, the cost of employing good specialized Linux IT personnel, etc.

 

In the grand scheme of things, the cost Linux vs Microsoft for a corporation, isn't really very different.

 

While you make a good point overall, retraining people isn't necessary in all cases. I can tell you from experience that even older people can make the switch to linux for basic tasks without needing any retraining.

 

If you're in an environment where thorough knowledge of the OS is required, sure, but if those people are going to be working in the same application they just need to know how to start said application, which is  pretty much the same on most linux distros as it is on windows nowadays.

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While you make a good point overall, retraining people isn't necessary in all cases. I can tell you from experience that even older people can make the switch to linux for basic tasks without needing any retraining.

 

If you're in an environment where thorough knowledge of the OS is required, sure, but if those people are going to be working in the same application they just need to know how to start said application, which is  pretty much the same on most linux distros as it is on windows nowadays.

Yes, some people, including older people, will require no retraining, but you're seriously underestimating the amount of people who will need retraining. I work as part of a small corporate IT team for a library, and we have ~50-75 employees. Most of them barely know how to sign into their user account, ONLY if their user name is already present (seriously, if a different user name is on the screen, they get confused). Many of them barely know how to use Windows XP/7 in the most basic sense, doing many things wrong or inefficiently.

 

I wouldn't try retraining my staff on Linux, as it would be a glorified shit-show of problems. The adaption and learning curve would be immense.

 

So sure, some users might switch no problem... They aren't the ones that cost money. It's the rest of them, that "click on the big 'E' to launch internet".

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Is this stupid? Yes.

Is it still the most powerful military in the world? Yes.

 

Imagine what it would be like if we had people at the helm who were tech savvy and not morons sucking their thumbs.

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Yes, some people, including older people, will require no retraining, but you're seriously underestimating the amount of people who will need retraining. I work as part of a small corporate IT team for a library, and we have ~50-75 employees. Most of them barely know how to sign into their user account, ONLY if their user name is already present (seriously, if a different user name is on the screen, they get confused). Many of them barely know how to use Windows XP/7 in the most basic sense, doing many things wrong or inefficiently.

 

I wouldn't try retraining my staff on Linux, as it would be a glorified shit-show of problems. The adaption and learning curve would be immense.

 

So sure, some users might switch no problem... They aren't the ones that cost money. It's the rest of them, that "click on the big 'E' to launch internet".

 

Wait, what? My grandma had more computer skills than the people in your IT team, and she only learned to use a computer when she was 70.

 

I've seen my fair share of computer illiterate people, but all of them don't have issues logging in at least. 

 

I'll take your word for it, but I've never seen someone who had to work at a computer all day and didn't have at least basic knowledge about using it.

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Linux Support is actually just as - if not even more - expensive compared to Windows Support.

 

That's one of the reasons why the major Linux Distros can offer a free version, is because Support Contracts cost extra, where they are included with the cost of Windows/Windows Server.

 

Not to mention good Linux SysAdmins are costly to employ.

 

Linux isn't "magically free" for corporations/governments/government agencies. Sure, there's no upfront purchase cost, but there are a ton of other costs many people don't think about.

 

For starters, the cost of retraining 100,000 people to use Linux - most of which, have probably never touched a Linux computer in their life (Not counting Android, since it's so fundamentally different on the UI side of things). Next you've got the support contract, the cost of employing good specialized Linux IT personnel, etc.

 

In the grand scheme of things, the cost Linux vs Microsoft for a corporation, isn't really very different.

very true which is why i have a linux sysadmin teaching me his ways. All the money thats what ill have. hopefully.

 

Its odd that people ignore the costs that come with linux, it surprised me definitely but looking at what it offers well it does seem like a good option.

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Wait, what? My grandma had more computer skills than the people in your IT team, and she only learned to use a computer when she was 70.

 

I've seen my fair share of computer illiterate people, but all of them don't have issues logging in at least. 

 

I'll take your word for it, but I've never seen someone who had to work at a computer all day and didn't have at least basic knowledge about using it.

Erm what? Your Grandma might have more computer skills than my average staff member, but not my IT team... Besides, age does not really equate to Computer Skill level.

 

very true which is why i have a linux sysadmin teaching me his ways. All the money thats what ill have. hopefully.

 

Its odd that people ignore the costs that come with linux, it surprised me definitely but looking at what it offers well it does seem like a good option.

Yeah I have no idea why people always ignore the costs associated with Linux. They see that the OS itself is free, and think "Welp that's that". On a personal level, where you're willing to learn Linux for your own uses, sure no problem.

 

In a corporate environment when you have non-techy users learning it - big difference.

 

But definitely, learn as much about Linux SysAdmin as you can! Great for the resume!

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Yes, some people, including older people, will require no retraining, but you're seriously underestimating the amount of people who will need retraining. I work as part of a small corporate IT team for a library, and we have ~50-75 employees. Most of them barely know how to sign into their user account, ONLY if their user name is already present (seriously, if a different user name is on the screen, they get confused). Many of them barely know how to use Windows XP/7 in the most basic sense, doing many things wrong or inefficiently.

 

I wouldn't try retraining my staff on Linux, as it would be a glorified shit-show of problems. The adaption and learning curve would be immense.

 

So sure, some users might switch no problem... They aren't the ones that cost money. It's the rest of them, that "click on the big 'E' to launch internet".

I totally agree with you. So many people are really super computer illiterate to a point you can't imagine. This is probably not too bad, but I've seen people that HAVE to double click on every single thing which drives me crazy.

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Yes, some people, including older people, will require no retraining, but you're seriously underestimating the amount of people who will need retraining. I work as part of a small corporate IT team for a library, and we have ~50-75 employees. Most of them barely know how to sign into their user account, ONLY if their user name is already present (seriously, if a different user name is on the screen, they get confused). Many of them barely know how to use Windows XP/7 in the most basic sense, doing many things wrong or inefficiently.

 

I wouldn't try retraining my staff on Linux, as it would be a glorified shit-show of problems. The adaption and learning curve would be immense.

 

So sure, some users might switch no problem... They aren't the ones that cost money. It's the rest of them, that "click on the big 'E' to launch internet".

Lol the way you put it these people cannot use an OS in general. Linux is not the problem, it is the users. If you can use Windows well, then believe me you can use Linux just fine. It is not that much harder anymore and the terminal has become just an added "plus" for the power users and is not really needed to do basic stuff.

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Lol the way you put it these people cannot use an OS in general. Linux is not the problem, it is the users. If you can use Windows well, then believe me you can use Linux just fine. It is not that much harder anymore and the terminal has become just an added "plus" for the power users and is not really needed to do basic stuff.

 

Many people in the workplace can't even use Windows well, that's the problem.

 

See, pretty much anybody over the age of 30 grew up in a time when desktop computers didn't even exist or were very scarce. They never learned how to use them growing up and for most of their life they never needed to know how to use them anyway.

 

When my father was in high school everything was done on paper. His high school literally did not have a single computer. Zilch, zero. And he certainly never had one in his home or anywhere else. Then if someone from that time all of a sudden has to learn to use a computer as part of their job, they only learn exactly what is needed to perform their job duties. That's it. They don't explore and tinker with them to learn the ins and outs. That's what you have to remember.

 

When you grow up with computers everywhere its easy to forget that there are still many generations of people that grew up when they didn't even exist.

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Many people in the workplace can't even use Windows well, that's the problem.

 

See, pretty much anybody over the age of 30 grew up in a time when desktop computers didn't even exist or were very scarce. They never learned how to use them growing up and for most of their life they never needed to know how to use them anyway.

 

When my father was in high school everything was done on paper. His high school literally did not have a single computer. Zilch, zero. And he certainly never had one in his home or anywhere else. Then if someone from that time all of a sudden has to learn to use a computer as part of their job, they only learn exactly what is needed to perform their job duties. That's it. They don't explore and tinker with them to learn the ins and outs. That's what you have to remember.

 

When you grow up with computers everywhere its easy to forget that there are still many generations of people that grew up when they didn't even exist.

Very true.

 

The attitude that "Well if they can learn Windows, they can learn Linux" comes, mostly, from the younger users here, especially anyone who has never worked corporate IT.

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Erm what? Your Grandma might have more computer skills than my average staff member, but not my IT team... Besides, age does not really equate to Computer Skill level.

 

Worded that wrong. I was talking about the ones that aren't able to log in.

 

That being said, it has been proven that elder people struggle with learning new things. It's harder for them. She's from around 1940, way before computers, obviously. She got her FIRST computer when she was around 70, and had no prior experience.

 

My point is that if a 70+ year old woman who has never used a computer before can learn how to use one properly in a fairly short timespan, young people should be able to do so in considerably less time with greater effect.

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Worded that wrong. I was talking about the ones that aren't able to log in.

 

That being said, it has been proven that elder people struggle with learning new things. It's harder for them. She's from around 1940, way before computers, obviously. She got her FIRST computer when she was around 70, and had no prior experience.

 

My point is that if a 70+ year old woman who has never used a computer before can learn how to use one properly in a fairly short timespan, young people should be able to do so in considerably less time with greater effect.

Yeah. SHOULD be able to. But I deal with the real world on a daily basis, not hypothetical wants and wishes.

 

The real world is that it's hard enough to get regular users to jump from Windows XP to Windows 7, that jumping them to Linux would be an IT nightmare.

 

Could they eventually learn the system and get by with it? Certainly, sure. Would it be worth the time and cost? Hellllllll no. The amount wasted in training, and in constantly being called or interrupted with little questions here and there as they try and do stuff would far outweigh the savings from not having to purchase Windows.

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Many people in the workplace can't even use Windows well, that's the problem.

 

See, pretty much anybody over the age of 30 grew up in a time when desktop computers didn't even exist or were very scarce. They never learned how to use them growing up and for most of their life they never needed to know how to use them anyway.

 

When my father was in high school everything was done on paper. His high school literally did not have a single computer. Zilch, zero. And he certainly never had one in his home or anywhere else. Then if someone from that time all of a sudden has to learn to use a computer as part of their job, they only learn exactly what is needed to perform their job duties. That's it. They don't explore and tinker with them to learn the ins and outs. That's what you have to remember.

 

When you grow up with computers everywhere its easy to forget that there are still many generations of people that grew up when they didn't even exist.

Yeah I'm with you and you're exactly right. What I was saying is that the problem is not the OS; it's the user.

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Windows XP just does not want to die xD good time to have an XP VM

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Yeah I'm with you and you're exactly right. What I was saying is that the problem is not the OS; it's the user.

It's true, it IS the user... But it doesn't matter. We have to work with what we have, and that happens to be very tech illiterate. So in that case, getting them to change to a fundamentally different OS, is incredibly expensive, regardless of the cost of the actual OS.

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Is this stupid? Yes.

Is it still the most powerful military in the world? Yes.

 

Imagine what it would be like if we had people at the helm who were tech savvy and not morons sucking their thumbs.

Honestly the amount the US spends of 'defence' surely they could afford to re-train staff to use a more secure OS, that and upgrade the software from legacy status.

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Honestly the amount the US spends of 'defence' surely they could afford to re-train staff to use a more secure OS, that and upgrade the software from legacy status.

Try convincing Congress of that. Rather than lining their own pockets.

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