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Replacing Cyberpower UPS Battery Questions?

paulyron

Bought this Cyberpower UPS many years ago.  It might have been 6 or 7 years ago.  Back then I would have it plugged into the wall outlet but not even turn it on.  I would connect my laptop, 2 external monitors and everything else into a 600 joule surge protector.  The reason why I didn't turn my UPS on and had everything connected to the 600 joules surge protector when I first got it was because I heard having the UPS on uses more electricity so because of that, my plan was just have everything connected to the 600 joule surge protector.  If there is a power outage, then I power on my UPS and then connect my laptop charger to it.  Then I would be using my laptop while connected to the UPS but I would then not have my 2 monitors connected to it.  I wouldn't want my 2 monitors connected to the UPS at the same time because that would mean the UPS would drain the battery very fast etc.  I got a UPS back then so if I have a power outage, I could then use the UPS as backup battery for my laptop for as long as possible and I believe I might even gotten 2 hours or so?  I am pretty sure I would probably gotten 1 hour at least?  I didn't test it that much but I remember I could definitely use it for up to 1 hour back then when I first got it.  The thing was I rarely used it much.

 

 

After a few years, I notice the UPS would run out of battery very fast.  Then at one point, the 130 minutes it showed when powered on would go down to 0 within 2 minutes.  So that meant by battery was no good right?  Think it was a few years later when battery went bad and I rarely used it.  I would have it plugged it outlet but rarely powered on unless I had a power outage.  Well not only that, I notice that in the back of the Cyberpower UPS, the Wiring Fault seems to be bright red.  Back then, I'm pretty positive it wasn't but not 100% sure.  My 600 joule surge protector had an issue where there was zapping from a surge so I stopped connecting any monitor or laptop charger to it.  I only connected the modem for a while and that was it.

 

 

I don't even have the ups turned on anymore but have laptop charger and 2 monitors and other things connected to it.  The other thing is one side of the UPS with the 6 outlets that has Surge + Battery does not even work when I connect anything to it.  Only the right side that says Surge works.  Does anyone know the reason for this?  Is it because of the battery or is it because of the red light of Wiring Fault?

 

 

 

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The thing is i know this UPS needs battery replacement and it seems I have to buy 2 batteries correct for this?  I read reviews people said you need 2 batteries for it.  This is the correct battery for it but i need 2 right?  

 

https://www.amazon.com.mx/CyberPower-RB1290-Cartucho-remplazo-batería/dp/B009ACPC7K/ref=sr_1_1?__mk_es_MX=ÅMÅŽÕÑ&crid=1WQT9V19HKZRE&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.ytKrLPHxGc5_gKJpnrBDy7eNeluyL89MciwPSMlXAAbG5eIAS_K9zeBNsobw3QWUW1w_s5FB8mC9ewz-oQadt0FopDrQWzTKJ9hoEN-YYbs7ivQxQNuAxsMqwf-ZqTfiJf-Ml9-ZpgL8jVprKm0iIb3rltMby_FaT-gVNDwY6jN_ZbmkXD0psotzKo34vus9B48OBhWzJzInePMumiRAXRZJ1JwJOXyt0xnyqXEOextkR1fdlpad9Oh9OccvCnw6tY9Ntd7T62X2JF6Kvo_ATX7b-n-I6dIgnyM3ko9_lpk.K9a81H10cLwUJBPBcODHKznLFAj9gFS2x3Id3u1puiw&dib_tag=se&keywords=cyberpower+ups+battery&qid=1718951695&sprefix=cyberpower+ups+battery%2Caps%2C108&sr=8-1&ufe=app_do%3Aamzn1.fos.242f5c11-6cfd-40d6-91f6-be3d1974080c

 

 

This seems ridiculous because buying 2 of these cost like 60-80% of buying a completely new same UPS. 

 

 

 

However, if you buy it off the US website, it's less than half the price here.

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-RB1290-Replacement-Maintenance-Free-Installable/dp/B009ACPC7K/ref=sr_1_3?crid=1Z587FLEQD7CJ&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.3chIc_BM_bSS0pRlX2tp0ymxchsD9icBTTNMiuoBOK6EJDPDE8-rQgjyH7HG6dl4dTPwPgVKDY-TTu2MAM6WgFIVH2-6FINb3scv150XezwAEZUkloROJDgroz7u8idIU5vIHvSovO3dncriH9o2SOab8YCumwdi-W1xvIhCzmV_7K04G3WsV4-TzLRmB8S6R_86X8r_OMSn1HCACwNDD8GUzA7rpHlvRDInXC5B-bQ.e1JMexEcr0ShLIJf5RzWpF9o8myPHPpQGCsMf7b47Rg&dib_tag=se&keywords=cyberpower%2Bups%2Bbattery&qid=1718951765&sprefix=cyberpower%2Bups%2Bbatter%2Caps%2C104&sr=8-3&th=1

 

 

But would this below work as well?  Seems to be the same specs as above but half the price?  

 

https://www.amazon.com/12V-Replacement-Battery-CyberPower-RB1290/dp/B01FK9B7UW/ref=sr_1_5?crid=1Z587FLEQD7CJ&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.3chIc_BM_bSS0pRlX2tp0ymxchsD9icBTTNMiuoBOK6EJDPDE8-rQgjyH7HG6dl4dTPwPgVKDY-TTu2MAM6WgFIVH2-6FINb3scv150XezwAEZUkloROJDgroz7u8idIU5vIHvSovO3dncriH9o2SOab8YCumwdi-W1xvIhCzmV_7K04G3WsV4-TzLRmB8S6R_86X8r_OMSn1HCACwNDD8GUzA7rpHlvRDInXC5B-bQ.e1JMexEcr0ShLIJf5RzWpF9o8myPHPpQGCsMf7b47Rg&dib_tag=se&keywords=cyberpower+ups+battery&qid=1718951765&sprefix=cyberpower+ups+batter%2Caps%2C104&sr=8-5

 

 

 

The thing is I have no clue about opening a UPS.  I am concerned I will make a mistake and break something.  But is this an easy process to replace the battery?  The other thing is, would there be any dangers if you do it wrong like you would cause the battery to release a chemical smell and it's dangerous if you don't do the procedure correct?  There is 1 or 2 computer shops where I'm located that most likely can replace the battery without an issue.  Should I first bring the UPS there just for them to examine that my UPS still works even though there is that red light Wiring Fault and this is just a battery issue?  If so, how much money should one pay for them to replace the UPS battery for you if you provide them with the batteries if you buy it yourself?

 

 

Does it make sense to just buy a new UPS then based on this?  If replacing the UPS batteries which requires buying 2 batteries cost half the price of a new UPS, then it's worth it but once it gets to around 60-80% of a new UPS, it might be better buying a new UPS?  The issue is UPS is very expensive if I buy it where I'm located though and electronics in general.

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More than likely, the battery died. The surge+UPS outlets probably don't work for that reason.

 

A new sealed lead-acid battery shouldn't be expensive. They're standard, off-the-shelf parts that come in standard sizes. You don't need one that's "CyberPower Certified", any 12v 9A SLAs should work fine.

 

If long runtime is your goal, get one of those camping battery power supplies from the likes of Jackery or Ecoflow. They use modern lithium batteries, so they'll last a lot longer on a charge. (Run the laptop off a travel adapter plugged into DC too, so you eliminate the efficiency losses of inverting DC back to AC just for a power brick to turn it back to DC again.)

I sold my soul for ProSupport.

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But what about the red light wiring fault that is bright red?  Back then, I don't remember it being that red though.  I mean it could have been, but I'm pretty sure it wasn't.

 

 

The surge + UPS outlets worked for quite a while after the battery got worn.  However, I wasn't sure if the battery was done.  What I do know is if I were to turn on the UPS now when it isn't connected to the outlet, it would go from 130 minutes to 0 minutes within a minute or so.  So does that mean the battery is dead though?  Wouldn't a dead battery mean if you power it on, it wouldn't even turn on?  Last time I powered it on when not connected to outlet, the timer just went to 0 minutes real fast.

 

 

The thing is where I'm located where I have this UPS, electronics there are really expensive.  Example the links I posted with the replacement battery, it cost double what it cost in the US.  I also have to buy 2 of them as well for this cyberpower 1500 VA model.  Now if you look at the last 2 links where if you buy it from the US, it is about 50 dollars each for the cyberpower UPS battery replacement but if you buy that Mighty Max one which is also showing the 12V 9Ah, that is half the price.  

 

 

The thing is I would prefer to buy 2 batteries in the US before I go and travel over there as it would cost twice the amount whether I buy the cyberpower battery or the mighty max battery in the other country.  Would you recommend I do this?  If so, get the might max battery instead?  The issue with this however is say I bring those 2 batteries with me over to the other country where I would be using the UPS.  Is it possible my UPS is done where a replacement battery wouldn't work and thus I wasted money buying the replacement batteries in the US?  Thus I would end up either buying a new UPS or no UPS?  If I know my UPS is 100% a new battery issue, I would buy 2 new batteries here in the US first.  But should I or should I not?  The thing is I'm pretty sure I'm going to bring it to a shop for them to install the new batteries because I will for sure screw it up.  But is it possible to install it bad where it's a health danger like you leaked acid or things like that and just have a computer tech do it the correct way?

 

 

Long run time is my goal.  The thing is when I get a power outage, I have to be on my laptop for many hours.  So I have my laptop battery for a few hours at the most.  I also have 2 powerbanks that probably give me an hour each at the most etc.  So with a UPS, that would give me more time if power outage.  And during this time, I don't want to use my 2 external monitors even though those 2 monitors are essential in what I'm doing.  But I won't have the monitors on though if a power outage happens as that would use up the UPS runtime real fast.  And since my UPS hasn't had a working battery for a while and when power outage happens, I just use my laptop battery and the powerbanks with it and can't use my external monitors.

 

 

I heard of those Jackery power backups.  The thing is those can be kept inside an apartment and used inside an apartment right compared to like a car battery?  However, unless you buy a very expensive one, you aren't going to get more than maybe 2 or 3 hours out of it at the absolute max with your laptop?  I think maybe 1.5 hours?  Example, my anker 737 powerbank which has 20000 mah, I think I could get 1 hour 10 minutes maybe on it while using my xps 15 9520 laptop while plugged into it while my laptop battery is 100% and the powerbank is 100%.  My other powerbank probably gives me 50 minutes so I get 2 extra hours of backup.  My laptop battery maybe gives me 2.5 hours probably.  

 

 

 

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Here's the problem with your thinking

 

The UPS barely consumes any power when the quality of your mains power is good.  Basically, the UPS creates a nearly direct connection between the mains socket it's plugged in, and the outlets on it, so it will be basically 100% efficient. It won't consume more power. 

 

The circuitry inside the UPS is supposed to monitor the mains voltage and when it goes outside a safe range (for example 200v AC to 250v AC), it starts the inverter  to produce 230v , disconnects the output outlets from the mains and connects them to the inverter. 

 

Lead acid batteries self discharge over time and while the UPS is on, it won't refill the batteries until they drop below some threshold, like let's say 5-10% drop... and then the UPS can top them up slowly with low current, not stressing the batteries.  

 

However, you decided to keep the UPS off, so the batteries would self discharge and not be topped up, and when you actually have a power failure you power on the UPS and now the batteries are probably more discharged, maybe even down to 50-70% of their capacity, and the more discharged the batteries are, the less efficient the conversion is and it's a bit harder on batteries. Then, when power comes back, the UPS now has to charge the batteries from a much lower level to the peak charge, and that would take hours, and damages the batteries more than trickle charging them as needed.  

So you're fooling yourself ... you're saving maybe cents each month by keeping the UPS off, but you're wasting tens of cents each time the UPS has to charge up the batteries, and you're wasting dollars by killing the batteries with recharge cycles because you're not letting the batteries trickle charge as needed. 

 

A surge protector doesn't do the same things a UPS does... a surge protector protects devices from SOME things that could happen, but won't protect against brownouts (ex 150v AC instead of 230v AC for seconds at a time) or over voltages (ex you get 380v AC in, surge protector won't protect PC against that), and won't keep a system working, or devices working (your ISP router/modem, your NAS device, network switches etc etc).

 

A surge protector has some components that react very fast to events and disconnects outlets, while a UPS monitors, corrects if possible, or switches the outputs to battery sourced power while the mains input is outside safe ranges.

 

You bought the UPS for the wrong reasons ... you could have achieved the same thing by having a small power generator in your balcony or somewhere, just pour gasoline / diesel in it and you have energy ... you can get them for less than 2-300$. 

 

So you basically messed up the batteries by using the UPS the wrong way ... now you need to replace them and learn from your mistakes

 

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1 hour ago, paulyron said:

What I do know is if I were to turn on the UPS now when it isn't connected to the outlet, it would go from 130 minutes to 0 minutes within a minute or so.  So does that mean the battery is dead though?  Wouldn't a dead battery mean if you power it on, it wouldn't even turn on?  Last time I powered it on when not connected to outlet, the timer just went to 0 minutes real fast.

Yup. Dead. Flat. Kaput. Pining for the fjords.

 

UPSes are supposed to be plugged in and running all the time, sitting between your outlet and your devices. When the power goes out, they automatically switch to battery. (Hence the name, uninterruptible power supply.) 

 

You've basically been trying to use your traditional UPS as though it's a Jackery, and UPSes really don't like that.

 

1 hour ago, paulyron said:

The thing is those can be kept inside an apartment and used inside an apartment right compared to like a car battery?

Yes, they can be stored and used indoors. They're just an inverter with a big battery built-in. There's no engine, no exhaust. Most will even charge and run off a solar panel if you really want (but of course the solar panel has to be outside).

 

1 hour ago, paulyron said:

However, unless you buy a very expensive one, you aren't going to get more than maybe 2 or 3 hours out of it at the absolute max with your laptop?  I think maybe 1.5 hours?  Example, my anker 737 powerbank which has 20000 mah, I think I could get 1 hour 10 minutes maybe on it while using my xps 15 9520 laptop while plugged into it while my laptop battery is 100% and the powerbank is 100%.  My other powerbank probably gives me 50 minutes so I get 2 extra hours of backup.  My laptop battery maybe gives me 2.5 hours probably.  

This is why I don't like the misleading way "power banks" are marketed by their milliamp-hour rating. 24,000 looks like a big number, but it really isn't.

 

Your Anker has a 3.7v, 24000 mAh battery. Ohm's law says watts = volts x amps. 24,000 milliamps = 24 amps. 24 x 3.7 = 88 watt-hours.

 

The smallest, least expensive Ecoflow is the RIVER 2. It has a 200 watt-hour battery, so it will run your laptop at least twice as long. It also has regular AC wall outlets, so you can run your monitors if you want to (but at the expense of run time since you'll have more things drawing power).

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22 hours ago, mariushm said:

Here's the problem with your thinking

 

The UPS barely consumes any power when the quality of your mains power is good.  Basically, the UPS creates a nearly direct connection between the mains socket it's plugged in, and the outlets on it, so it will be basically 100% efficient. It won't consume more power. 

 

The circuitry inside the UPS is supposed to monitor the mains voltage and when it goes outside a safe range (for example 200v AC to 250v AC), it starts the inverter  to produce 230v , disconnects the output outlets from the mains and connects them to the inverter. 

 

Lead acid batteries self discharge over time and while the UPS is on, it won't refill the batteries until they drop below some threshold, like let's say 5-10% drop... and then the UPS can top them up slowly with low current, not stressing the batteries.  

 

However, you decided to keep the UPS off, so the batteries would self discharge and not be topped up, and when you actually have a power failure you power on the UPS and now the batteries are probably more discharged, maybe even down to 50-70% of their capacity, and the more discharged the batteries are, the less efficient the conversion is and it's a bit harder on batteries. Then, when power comes back, the UPS now has to charge the batteries from a much lower level to the peak charge, and that would take hours, and damages the batteries more than trickle charging them as needed.  

So you're fooling yourself ... you're saving maybe cents each month by keeping the UPS off, but you're wasting tens of cents each time the UPS has to charge up the batteries, and you're wasting dollars by killing the batteries with recharge cycles because you're not letting the batteries trickle charge as needed. 

 

A surge protector doesn't do the same things a UPS does... a surge protector protects devices from SOME things that could happen, but won't protect against brownouts (ex 150v AC instead of 230v AC for seconds at a time) or over voltages (ex you get 380v AC in, surge protector won't protect PC against that), and won't keep a system working, or devices working (your ISP router/modem, your NAS device, network switches etc etc).

 

A surge protector has some components that react very fast to events and disconnects outlets, while a UPS monitors, corrects if possible, or switches the outputs to battery sourced power while the mains input is outside safe ranges.

 

You bought the UPS for the wrong reasons ... you could have achieved the same thing by having a small power generator in your balcony or somewhere, just pour gasoline / diesel in it and you have energy ... you can get them for less than 2-300$. 

 

So you basically messed up the batteries by using the UPS the wrong way ... now you need to replace them and learn from your mistakes

 

Hey.  Yes what you said is correct.  I didn't know that the UPS barely consumes any power when my main power is good.  Years ago, I remember reading a few comments about people saying it uses a lot more electricity so because of that, that is the reason I had the setup the way I did.  

 

 

You are right about the UPS batteries being discharged even more when I would then need to use the UPS when there is a power outage.  The thing is when there is a power outage, I would then power the UPS on and the connect my laptop charger from 600 joule surge protector to the UPS which takes time.  But when this happens, I would use the UPS until it runs out of battery but rarely did that ever happen though.  But once power comes back, I make sure that my UPS is charged to 100% before I power it off and unplug the laptop charger back to the surge protector.  This was a while back how I did it.  I had thought it would cost a lot more if the UPS was on 24/7 from reading some comments which is why I did it that way.  The thing is I believe it was between 3 or 4 years or so when the battery just went bad.  By bad... I mean unplug UPS from outlet and power on.  Then the moment you power on... it shows 130 minutes all the way to it shutting off in like 1 or 2 minutes etc. 

 

 

But even if I used the UPS the correct way, 5 years is probably the most it last before you need a new battery anyways right?  I probably used the UPS no more than a 6 times in that few year span when I had a power outage and those power outages were never that long back when I had a UPS that worked.  

 

 

Yes I get what you mean about the surge protector.  I didn't know that.  The surge protector one time where there was a direct lightning strike, I think there was a zap in it as well.  I continued to use it but only connected my modem to it and that is all.  I wasn't going to connect my other monitors and things like that to it.

 

 

I heard people talked about the power generator.  The issue with this is I am in a studio apartment and don't really have a balcony.  So I can't keep it outside.  I was told if you keep it inside all the time, you can't do that and it isn't safe with a power generator.  

 

 

Yea I messed up the batteries by using the UPS the wrong way but it still would have need replacement after 5 years max right if I used it correctly from the start?  I think it was around 3 years or so before the batteries went bad but it could been a bit longer than that.

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21 hours ago, Needfuldoer said:

Yup. Dead. Flat. Kaput. Pining for the fjords.

 

UPSes are supposed to be plugged in and running all the time, sitting between your outlet and your devices. When the power goes out, they automatically switch to battery. (Hence the name, uninterruptible power supply.) 

 

You've basically been trying to use your traditional UPS as though it's a Jackery, and UPSes really don't like that.

 

Yes, they can be stored and used indoors. They're just an inverter with a big battery built-in. There's no engine, no exhaust. Most will even charge and run off a solar panel if you really want (but of course the solar panel has to be outside).

 

This is why I don't like the misleading way "power banks" are marketed by their milliamp-hour rating. 24,000 looks like a big number, but it really isn't.

 

Your Anker has a 3.7v, 24000 mAh battery. Ohm's law says watts = volts x amps. 24,000 milliamps = 24 amps. 24 x 3.7 = 88 watt-hours.

 

The smallest, least expensive Ecoflow is the RIVER 2. It has a 200 watt-hour battery, so it will run your laptop at least twice as long. It also has regular AC wall outlets, so you can run your monitors if you want to (but at the expense of run time since you'll have more things drawing power).

Yea I get what you mean.  The only reason I didn't have everything connected to the UPS was because I thought the electric bill was going to be a lot higher having it on 24/7.  I recall several people mentioned this so I then thought... if that is the case, I only power it on and use it when I have to during a power outage.  

 

 

Yea I heard about the Jackery a bit later and that is how I was using it.  I did it that way again because I thought electricity bill would be extremely high which I was incorrect.

 

 

Okay so something like a Jackery can be stored indoors so that is good then as I would have it indoors if I buy one.

 

 

I bought powerbanks back then because it was the most convenient.  Here is the interesting thing though.  Back then my older dell xps 15 9550, I bought 2 of the same Dell PW7015LC powerbanks.  I remember when I tested it during a power outage, let my laptop battery is plugged in at 100% and now now power.  I then connect the dell powerbank to it and use my computer like normal.  I remember it would take like 1 hour 45 minutes for the powerbank to drain from 5 bars to 0 bars.  So imagine 2 powerbanks... that would be 3.5 hours of backup which is a lot.  Then I have my laptop battery which probably was 2.5 hours or so which is 6 hours.  If the UPS had a new battery, it probably could get 2 hours at least oso 8 hours total?

 

 

Thing is I got a new laptop, a dell xps 15 9520 and both of those dell powerbanks were no longer compatible because new laptop used usb-c while old laptop uses barrel.  I had to buy a usb-c to barrel adapter but it was sold out for a long time.  I ended up getting a dell pw7018lc powerbank that is usb-c.  The issue is with the new laptop, I think I got 50 minutes before the powerbank went from 5 bars to 0 bars.  That is like half the time compared to that other powerbank with the older dell laptop.  Both the pw7018lc usb c powerbank and the older pw7015l barrel powerbank is 18000 mah.  However, I believe the reason why I only got 50 minutes of battery backup on the usb c powerbank is because the new laptop has a i7-12700h processor so it's very power hungry right?  Older xps laptop was an i5-6300hq.  The anker 737 powerbank gets me maybe 1 hour 10 minutes of battery backup on the new xps laptop so 2 hours total.  I no longer use those 2 older pw7015l barrel powerbanks since it isn't compatable with the newer xps 15 9520 laptop.

 

 

So the ecoflow will get 2x the time as the anker 737 so that would be 2 hours 20 minutes.  What about the jackery ones though?

 

 

Now what about buying a replacement battery for my cyberpower 1500?  I know I need to buy 2 of them.  Should I buy them in the US as it would be cheaper or buy them in the other country where I would use it?  It's twice the price over there.  However, I don't want to buy it in the US only to find out my UPS no longer works so then the UPS battery replacements I bought would be useless.  Is it possible to screw up installing replacement battery for the UPS? 

 

 

How much should you pay a store to install the UPS batteries for you if you buy it yourself?  Is it possible if you do it wrong, it can be an issue with the batteries leaking or some hazard?

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So would you recommend me buy the 2 batteries right now or not?  Should I have someone at a computer shop take a look at the UPS just to make sure it's still good before I buy replacement batteries for it?  I know I need to get 2 batteries for this cyberpower ups that is 1500 VA.

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5 hours ago, paulyron said:

So would you recommend me buy the 2 batteries right now or not?  Should I have someone at a computer shop take a look at the UPS just to make sure it's still good before I buy replacement batteries for it?  I know I need to get 2 batteries for this cyberpower ups that is 1500 VA.

all those years i've been running UPS's in datacenters we have been running sheduled tests a few times a year, disconnecing power, and about every 2 years replacing batteries as they die alot faster keeping max load all the time. that's just how they work. 

it's very few parts that can break in your UPS. if it still works when running everything through the UPS, just dies when power is cut, i would assume it's just dead batteries, and replace them, if it don't work, and only work if you set it to bypass batteries, i would take it to a tech that knows what he's doing. 

Depending on size of UPS, regular replacement is done by setting it to bypass, replace batteries and turn off bypass. 

on smaller systems i would just shut everything down replace and turn on again. 

 

 

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I am pretty certain this is the Cyberpower 1500 VA UPS I bought years ago.  

 

 

https://www.amazon.com.mx/CyberPower-CP1500AVRLCD-Mini-torre-Sistema-inteligente/dp/B000FBK3QK/ref=sr_1_1?__mk_es_MX=ÅMÅŽÕÑ&crid=RYXBJPG94OI2&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.Vex7YSpSf3rGwfjK1OM2iyyii-mAZk2Ww5fwFKMhwm1wfBm2bRXZjvxlpBdBs5LE4-yBBPblLKpxEabkzOuk3YvRhBohFpcBD6Fo_fw7fFMt66Q-ZDw22Lhy7T3pYytIof8r4HvJsX5hrJz2N9dzTfiMNIUenvz_KnwqM-qWP-dHqbO0ubu6J3Q5LpXoGoETxtyhw9kW23x101SzQV9QXkW2UUe7r3YWRSoUrWAtZaIozsbvR7WTBaJw726OAutRHNduve7F1brJcc0KUo9mRP2MeoNg8BaYfhNtA4mZfNs.NjFRmIEt36_F9dtIpjXMGW8iZgPhj9RC57BbRk94qHo&dib_tag=se&keywords=cyberpower%2B1500va&qid=1719177349&sprefix=cyberpower%2B1500v%2Caps%2C374&sr=8-1&ufe=app_do%3Aamzn1.fos.d82afe12-491a-450a-80bc-7cca028917bf&th=1

 

 

https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP1500AVRLCD3-Intelligent-System-Outlets/dp/B0BCMLLSHL/ref=sr_1_4?crid=156ZSD3LWEAW3&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.py2p1CjYsER2Dt7xVK8wenoOZsoBUTOa2zdYgG-dJ7CMoL6k7MKjTMpnlVxDclAyWAgywr-nC-3Y-2LTlLiRGsK0y_f8eCRSNYBlYv0F6yECqLBl6tiH-AdTbCuOWX8UjMt5NxVBHqvwitozAJq6rb8d9Lt0t-bGiNJP94jtekXn0tSzFjC2fL40YloXnMvmFn3EnKsIEWvqAXatnqJ759mNvEYAzRRH6yzeNN2RBD0.AvAt-6ncSHNgrwZ4_oJ_hauoPeMDr3eQNs3CPLlWQVA&dib_tag=se&keywords=cyberpower+1500va&qid=1719177392&sprefix=cyberpower+1500v%2Caps%2C151&sr=8-4

 

 

I do know that when plugged into the outlet which is plugged in pretty much 24/7 but it isn't powered on, all 6 surge protector outlets do work.  It's the other 6 outlets on the left side that say battery and surge that does not work at all.  The only other thing is that Wiring Fault is very red and I don't recall it being very red a while back.  I mean it could have, but I don't remember that though.

 

 

Of course there is the when there is a power outage, all my monitors and everything else connected to the outlet immediately turn off.  If say I had the UPS turned on the entire time... and say a power outage occurs, I would guess either all my monitors and everything else connected to the outlet immediately turn off... or it would take maybe 1 minute max and the 130 minutes would go down to 0 minutes and power off really fast.  

 

 

So based on what i described, does this sound like just buying 2 replacement batteries would work?  But should I bring the UPS to a computer store first for them to diagnose if just buying new batteries would work before buying new batteries?  Would you recommend me having a computer store install the batteries for me with the UPS as I read if you don't do it correctly, there could be a boom or acid leaking which is not good?  How much should one pay for this service if say I bought the batteries online and then bring it to them?  At what point do you just buy a new UPS instead?  If say the 2 batteries cost $130, and a new UPS cost $300, you buy new batteries right?  I guess if you have someone install the batteries for you, it cost $50 max  But if the batteries cost like $220, and you still need to pay someone $50, then obviously buy a new UPS right?  I am pretty sure I will not install the new batteries correctly if I do it myself.

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