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How to use anti static strap

Go to solution Solved by Macfox38,
5 minutes ago, Needfuldoer said:

The idea is to even the electrical potential between you and the computer parts. The strap that plugs into the wall should only make a connection to the ground pin on your outlet, assuming your outlets are wired properly. You can check them with an outlet tester if you want, but they should be fine.

 

Anecdotally, I've never used a wrist strap and my PC parts have survived. Just touch a metal part of the case or the power supply once in a while as you're building. (Plug the power supply into the wall, but leave its power switch turned off. Ground is always connected.)

Generally i agree that the ESD strap is not needed. There was a great LTT collab with Electroboom where they shocked the ever living hell out of components and they had a hard time to get anything to fail.

 

There is still an argument that that an ESD may not kill the component out right but might shorten the life span of the parts.

hey can some one in a simple way explain how to use a anti static strap. I have one that plugs into the wall is that safe? Do i have to worry about testing the outlet or getting shocked?

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The idea is to even the electrical potential between you and the computer parts. The strap that plugs into the wall should only make a connection to the ground pin on your outlet, assuming your outlets are wired properly. You can check them with an outlet tester if you want, but they should be fine.

 

Anecdotally, I've never used a wrist strap and my PC parts have survived. Just touch a metal part of the case or the power supply once in a while as you're building. (Plug the power supply into the wall, but leave its power switch turned off. Ground is always connected.)

I sold my soul for ProSupport.

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I assume that the part that plugs into the wall just has the bottom prong for ground and the other 2 are just plastic. If so the risk of shock is minimal. traditionally with it plugged into the socket you place it around you wrist so that the metal plate is snug to your skin. Alternatively you could have it around your leg so that your hands remain free.

 

If you have a Multi meter you can test the resistance to make sure that it is within the manufacturer spec. iFixit straps are rated at 1 Megaohm

Technology is like a good friend that does its best to piss you off at every turn. yet we love them anyway. 

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3 minutes ago, Needfuldoer said:

The idea is to even the electrical potential between you and the computer parts. The strap that plugs into the wall should only make a connection to the ground pin on your outlet, assuming your outlets are wired properly. You can check them with an outlet tester if you want, but they should be fine.

 

Anecdotally, I've never used a wrist strap and my PC parts have survived. Just touch a metal part of the case or the power supply once in a while as you're building. (Plug the power supply into the wall, but leave its power switch turned off. Ground is always connected.)

ok thanks for the tip il have to grab one of those, rather be safe then sorry 

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5 minutes ago, Needfuldoer said:

The idea is to even the electrical potential between you and the computer parts. The strap that plugs into the wall should only make a connection to the ground pin on your outlet, assuming your outlets are wired properly. You can check them with an outlet tester if you want, but they should be fine.

 

Anecdotally, I've never used a wrist strap and my PC parts have survived. Just touch a metal part of the case or the power supply once in a while as you're building. (Plug the power supply into the wall, but leave its power switch turned off. Ground is always connected.)

Generally i agree that the ESD strap is not needed. There was a great LTT collab with Electroboom where they shocked the ever living hell out of components and they had a hard time to get anything to fail.

 

There is still an argument that that an ESD may not kill the component out right but might shorten the life span of the parts.

Technology is like a good friend that does its best to piss you off at every turn. yet we love them anyway. 

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These days components are harder to break in many ways then you would expect and static buildup is one of them. I built my pc on a carpet lmao(please don't do that I was lucky and it was on the mobo box). I recommend building the pc on a wood/marble/hard material that is not prone to static buildup.

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Yeah, its one of those plastics ones i just wanted to make sure i wasn't going to get electrocuted lol i think i just want to make sure it for professional use and i really cant it afford it messing up on me

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I've built/repaired a lot of PC's over the years, on the table, carpet, anywhere. Used to do laptop disassembly many times on the carpet because I didn't have room on the table at the moment and was too lazy to clean it and no part has ever been damaged.

 

If this is your first build I understand why you are scared and that's okay. 

I've never met anyone that had components got shocked from ESD while building their PC.

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