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Why it Was Almost Impossible to Put a Computer in Space

Thanks KIOXIA for sponsoring today’s video!
Check out KIOXIA SAS SSDs: https://lmg.gg/yNpTo
Check out KIOXIA NVMe SSDs: https://lmg.gg/htBQg

It’s really hard to put a computer into space… so hard in fact that laptops on the international space station are treated as effectively disposable. So when the folks at HPE wanted to put a SERVER on the ISS, people were a bit skeptical… and it turned out even with the help of KIOXIA’s fast and reliable storage devices, to be harder than they thought.

 

HPE Spaceborne 2 Project: https://hpe.com/info/spaceborne

The HPE Technology Now Podcast: https://youtu.be/5T5qiB6kfCc

NASA’s “Houston, We Have A Podcast”: https://www.nasa.gov/podcasts/houston-we-have-a-podcast/spaceborne-computer/

HPE’s January 29, 2024 Blog: https://www.hpe.com/us/en/newsroom/blog-post/2024/01/hpe-spaceborne-computer-program-the-incredible-journey-of-a-computer-at-the-farthest-edge.html 

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Imagine being Linus, sitting at home, with his earth grade water cooling loop for his PC.

Peasant!

I hope NASA let him buy some $800 fittings, and goes to town with stainless steel tubing. 

It would be glorious to watch Linus build a space grade PC for home!

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15 minutes ago, home server guy said:

How do they have that low of power

The secret tends to be money and lots of it.

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This is definitely one of the more interesting uploads from LTT in recent memory. Something that veers away from the constant slog of consumer tech but is about something that almost everyone knows about (the ISS) and how computing which is so important to them and us, is used differently along with all the constraints. More of this!

ALCATRAZ |   CPU: i9 9900k @ 5GHz, Motherboard: Asus Prime Z390-A, RAM: Corsair Vengence LPX 32GB, GPU: Gigabyte 1070Ti Case: Zalman MS800 Plus, Storage: Corsair 2TB NVME | Crucial M550 128GB SSD  |  WD 640GB HDD, PSU: XFX Pro Series 1050w, Display: ASUS MG279Q, Cooling: Noctua NH-D15

 

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Thats some neat sponsored connent. I like it.

People never go out of business.

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What kind of GPU are they using. Also how do they manage power between the servers to ensure they're below the allocated budget?

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4 hours ago, AndreiArgeanu said:

What kind of GPU are they using. Also how do they manage power between the servers to ensure they're below the allocated budget?

my guess lower power, low profile gpu.

MSI x399 sli plus  | AMD theardripper 2990wx all core 3ghz lock |Thermaltake flo ring 360 | EVGA 2080, Zotac 2080 |Gskill Ripjaws 128GB 3000 MHz | Corsair RM1200i |150tb | Asus tuff gaming mid tower| 10gb NIC

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I'm a little confused that you guys state that the ISS has a bandwidth to earth of only 1 Mbps, given that this article states they have a 600 Mbps connection https://www.sciencealert.com/the-iss-now-has-better-internet-than-most-of-us-after-its-latest-upgrade - We also frequently see livestreams in HD from the ISS.

 

Edit: one of such livestreams we saw in Denmark was from Andreas Mogensen, a danish astronaut https://www.dtu.dk/kalenderarkiv/2024/02/andreas-mogensen-live-fra-den-internationale-rumstation

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On 5/31/2024 at 9:42 PM, MartinSnow said:

I'm a little confused that you guys state that the ISS has a bandwidth to earth of only 1 Mbps, given that this article states they have a 600 Mbps connection https://www.sciencealert.com/the-iss-now-has-better-internet-than-most-of-us-after-its-latest-upgrade - We also frequently see livestreams in HD from the ISS.

That 600 Mbps is what's available over TDRS, except the ISS isn't the only thing that uses TDRS, heck NASA isn't even the main user. Most of the bandwidth is sucked down by DoD and NROL users. So in the same way your ISP might have tens or hundreds of gigabits per second of bandwidth, but you personally get to use just a tiny slice of that.

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