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Can I place a GPU and SSD on the same PCIe x16 (16GB/s) slot using a splitter?

Surban
Go to solution Solved by RONOTHAN##,

You need to make sure the motherboard actually supports PCIe bifurcation, since most boards (especially cheaper OEM boards) do not. If it does, you can find riser cards that will split the x16 slot into two x8 slots, or possibly an x8 and two x4 slots, though those adapters aren't super cheap and it might legitimately be cheaper to buy a new CPU/mobo/RAM.

 

Just use a SATA SSD, SATA II speeds aren't that big a deal since the main advantage of SSDs as boot drives is their random performance, not max bandwidth, and SATA II will still allow for good enough random performance. 

I have the following old PC from 2010:

Dell Studio XPS 8100
Intel DH57M01 motherboard
Intel Core i7-870 @ 2.93GHz, 4 cores, 8 logistical processors
BIOS version: A05 (July 8, 2010); Legacy Mode
4 x 4GB DDR3 1333MHz ram (max)
Windows 10

It has the following PCIe ports:
Gen2 x1 slot bi-directional speed – 500 MB/s
Gen2 x16 slot bi-directional speed – 16 GB/s

GTX 750 TI: I feel like my GPU wouldn’t be happy being on the x1 slot given the 500MB/s bandwidth.
SSD: My SSD might be a little happy on the x1 slot given than I only have SATA II (300 MB/s) so the x1 slot will give me better speeds.

My question is:
I don’t think my 750 TI is capable of using the full 16GB/s bandwidth, so instead of putting my SSD on the x1 slot can’t I use a splitter and place it on the x16 slot as well? Even at a 50% split I would get way better speeds than on the x1 slot and when the GPU isn’t being used, I would get even more than 50% allocation from the slot.
Or am I wrong in my assumption and it would throttle my GPU? (The most I ever play is like Skyrim or Witcher 3, even those rarely.)

Also, my BIOS doesn’t support UEFI, so I guess I would have to learn how to use Clover to boot my OS from the PCIe SSD.

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What problem are you havin?

 

I'd just boot from the sata ssd. Upgrading to a pcie ssd will make almost no difference, and gonna be a pain for this old system. I don't see a reason to ehre.

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You need to make sure the motherboard actually supports PCIe bifurcation, since most boards (especially cheaper OEM boards) do not. If it does, you can find riser cards that will split the x16 slot into two x8 slots, or possibly an x8 and two x4 slots, though those adapters aren't super cheap and it might legitimately be cheaper to buy a new CPU/mobo/RAM.

 

Just use a SATA SSD, SATA II speeds aren't that big a deal since the main advantage of SSDs as boot drives is their random performance, not max bandwidth, and SATA II will still allow for good enough random performance. 

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Welcome to the forums!

Ooof, that's PCIe 2.0, I'd not mess with it. I'm with Wizard, what problem are you trying to solve here?

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Why?

Seems like you're trying to get performance that you won't even notice.

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1 hour ago, RONOTHAN## said:

You need to make sure the motherboard actually supports PCIe bifurcation, since most boards (especially cheaper OEM boards) do not. If it does, you can find riser cards that will split the x16 slot into two x8 slots, or possibly an x8 and two x4 slots, though those adapters aren't super cheap and it might legitimately be cheaper to buy a new CPU/mobo/RAM.

 

Just use a SATA SSD, SATA II speeds aren't that big a deal since the main advantage of SSDs as boot drives is their random performance, not max bandwidth, and SATA II will still allow for good enough random performance. 

 

This seems to be the right answer.

I didn't even Know about that. My motherboard probably is much too old to support bifurcation since it doesn't even support UEFI.
Other online forms tell me the active PCIe switching splitters are very expensive and not worth it on this old PC.

You're right, SATA II SSD is probably the best and easiest and cheapest solution. (I might still look into the x1 slot adapter for a SSD though if I can figure out the Clover boot solution. Would pair up better if I put in a USB 3.0 port on the second x1 slot.)

Thank you for the help good sir!
 

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1 hour ago, Electronics Wizardy said:

What problem are you havin?

 

I'd just boot from the sata ssd. Upgrading to a pcie ssd will make almost no difference, and gonna be a pain for this old system. I don't see a reason to ehre.

 

53 minutes ago, dizmo said:

Why?

Seems like you're trying to get performance that you won't even notice.

 

 


Yeah, the post I marked as the solution helped me realize that. The splitter is out of the question.

 

But my follow up question is:
Would I notice a performance difference between a SATA II SSD (300MB/s) and using the x1 PCIe slot (500 MB/s) since I can use the second x1 slot for a USB 3.0 port, they would compliment each other better?
 

Edited by Surban
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2 hours ago, Surban said:

 

 

 


Yeah, the post I marked as the solution helped me realize that. The splitter is out of the question.

 

But my follow up question is:
Would I notice a performance difference between a SATA II SSD (300MB/s) and using the x1 PCIe slot (500 MB/s) since I can use the second x1 slot for a USB 3.0 port, they would compliment each other better?
 

You most likely won't notice any performance different between a sata and pcie ssd for most uses.

 

Use it for a usb 3, it will be a much bigger improvement if you use external disks.

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