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AM5 Retention Clips 3D Print Specs?

Hi all,

 

Bought a second hand mobo and all is well except it did not come with retention clips for my Lian Li Galahad II AIO. I've seen a couple people mention that they have 3D printed these in the past but I've only found specs for the AM4 clips. I've tried these out but they do not fit with the AM5 Socket. 

Also, I know that I could just return the AIO and get one that secures onto the mobo itself, but just wanted to see if anyone had the specs on hand since it would be a lot faster to just print them out and throw them on.

 

Appreciate you all!!

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8 minutes ago, BigBoss333 said:

I've seen a couple people mention that they have 3D printed these in the past but I've only found specs for the AM4 clips. I've tried these out but they do not fit with the AM5 Socket. 

That really shouldn't be the case, the AM4 and AM5 clips should be the exact same dimensions. Can you include a photo of them not fitting correctly? It could just be that the stl you were using was for the wrong dimension or something along those lines. 

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Is there even a filament strong enough to 3D print this sort of thing?  Not to mention the temperatures around the socket that could make it go soft.

 

Just sounds like a bad idea all around to me.

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32 minutes ago, RONOTHAN## said:

That really shouldn't be the case, the AM4 and AM5 clips should be the exact same dimensions. Can you include a photo of them not fitting correctly? It could just be that the stl you were using was for the wrong dimension or something along those lines. 

Attached below. These are the AM4 clips that I bought off of amazon. The thicker part of the clips seem to be sitting right on top of the CPU socket itself.

BRACKET2.jpg

BRACKET3.jpg

BRACKET1.jpg

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16 minutes ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

Is there even a filament strong enough to 3D print this sort of thing?  Not to mention the temperatures around the socket that could make it go soft.

 

Just sounds like a bad idea all around to me.

Do you think so? I was planning on just using it in the interim while some AM5 brackets I found on Ebay came in. Hadn't really considered that.

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24 minutes ago, BigBoss333 said:

Do you think so? I was planning on just using it in the interim while some AM5 brackets I found on Ebay came in. Hadn't really considered that.

 

41 minutes ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

Is there even a filament strong enough to 3D print this sort of thing?  Not to mention the temperatures around the socket that could make it go soft.

 

Just sounds like a bad idea all around to me.

I printed the backplate part of the retention for the AM4 bracket for my wife's PC in PETG. It lasted the entire time I used it before I changed out her motherboard. No issues over several months. 

 

The higher heat deflection temperature the more okay you should be.

 

https://help.prusa3d.com/materials

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27 minutes ago, BigBoss333 said:

Do you think so? I was planning on just using it in the interim while some AM5 brackets I found on Ebay came in. Hadn't really considered that.

Its not that it can't be done, a quick check shows experts can use ABS filament that remains hard up to 95C but it gives off toxic fumes so needs to be in a well ventilated environment.  Typical filaments seem to get soft at 55-65C, but there's also the question of if they can take the clamping force on the socket without falling apart.

I'm no expert, just what I've read and my experience that things I've bought 3D printed are quite fragile.

 

1 minute ago, TylerD321 said:

 

I printed the backplate part of the retention for the AM4 bracket for my wife's PC in PETG. It lasted the entire time I used it before I changed out her motherboard. No issues over several months. 

 

The higher heat deflection temperature the more okay you should be.

 

https://help.prusa3d.com/materials

The backplate will be subject to different forces than the front though where you have clamping force pulling at the relatively small lugs.

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3 minutes ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

Typical filaments seem to get soft at 55-65C, but there's also the question of if they can take the clamping force on the socket without falling apart.

You have to remember that the temperature your CPU and GPU read aren't anywhere close to the temperature of outside of the heatsinks of those. I wouldn't expect this to be an issue. A quality PETG should be fine for this IMO.

 

5 minutes ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

I'm no expert, just what I've read and my experience that things I've bought 3D printed are quite fragile.

This has to do more with infill percent, how many perimeter walls you have it set to (I always print with 3, standard is usually 2), and the exact fill pattern you use. Some infill are better in different axes. For example prusa gyroid infill is pretty good at X,Y, and Z strength. https://all3dp.com/2/strongest-infill-pattern/

 

9 minutes ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

The backplate will be subject to different forces than the front though where you have clamping force pulling at the relatively small lugs.

This is a fair point, but I really don't think this is an issue with the correct 3d printing settings selected

My PC Specs: (expand to view)

 

 

Main Gaming Machine

CPU: Intel Core i7-10700K - OC to 5 GHz All Cores
CPU Cooler: Corsair iCUE H115i RGB Pro XT (Front Mounted AIO)
Motherboard: Asus TUF GAMING Z490-PLUS (WI-FI)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600

Storage: Intel 665p 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME SSD (x2)
Video Card: Zotac RTX 3070 8 GB GAMING Twin Edge OC

Power Supply: Corsair RM850 850W
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow
Case Fan 120mm: Noctua F12 PWM 54.97 CFM 120 mm (x1)
Case Fan 140mm: Noctua A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140 mm (x4)
Monitor Main: Asus VG278QR 27.0" 1920x1080 165 Hz
Monitor Vertical: Asus VA27EHE 27.0" 1920x1080 75 Hz

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