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91 degrees on Core i5 1240P which is more powerful than Ryzen 7 3700X.

I have a laptop with a Core i5 1240P processor. When loading the processor itself without the graphics card that is integrated in the processor, the temperature on one core reaches 91 degrees and on the other cores it reaches 80-70 degrees, why such a difference. And it seems to me that 91 degrees is too much and the processor may degrade. Although the manufacturer states that the maximum temperature can be 105 degrees. Maybe do undervolting? But how to do it from the BIOS level and not in Windows.

 

In CPU-Z, tests:

Core i5 1240P
Multi Core: 5200 points
Single Core: 670 points

 

My Ryzen 7 3700X which is in the desktop computer:
Multi Core: 5700 points
Single Core: 520 points

 

It's amazing how much power the 1240P has on 1 core than the 3700X and a little less on all cores, but it only consumes 28W while the 3700X consumes 85W.

 

But something doesn't seem right to me and it's about the test in the Aida64 cpu qween program. The 3700X reaches 100,000 points while the 1240P reaches 67,000 points but the program pops up a message in the case of 1240P that virtualization is enabled and may interfere with the test, but why? It's also enabled on the 3700X and it's fine. I need virtualization for virtual machines, for example in VirtualBox. 

 

Does virtualization take away CPU power?

So it's probably not entirely clear how much power 1240P has - you would have to take the same video, for example in Premiere Pro, render on the processor itself and unpack the RAR archive, then you would know which one is more powerful.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, GamerGry123 said:

the program pops up a message in the case of 1240P that virtualization is enabled and may interfere with the test, but why? It's also enabled on the 3700X and it's fine. I need virtualization for virtual machines, for example in VirtualBox. 

It's likely complaining about Windows' virtualization-based security, not the CPU feature.

 

https://www.tomshardware.com/how-to/disable-vbs-windows-11

F@H
Desktop: i9-13900K, ASUS Z790-E, 64GB DDR5-6000 CL36, RTX3080, 2TB MP600 Pro XT, 2TB SX8200Pro, 2x16TB Ironwolf RAID0, Corsair HX1200, Antec Vortex 360 AIO, Thermaltake Versa H25 TG, Samsung 4K curved 49" TV, 23" secondary, Mountain Everest Max

Mobile SFF rig: i9-9900K, Noctua NH-L9i, Asrock Z390 Phantom ITX-AC, 32GB, GTX1070, 2x1TB SX8200Pro RAID0, 2x5TB 2.5" HDD RAID0, Athena 500W Flex (Noctua fan), Custom 4.7l 3D printed case

 

Asus Zenbook UM325UA, Ryzen 7 5700u, 16GB, 1TB, OLED

 

GPD Win 2

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