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Desoldering and replacing mobo ports?

IMG_20231128_202338.thumb.jpg.6a2698dc6ed32f7c874f00c8ec7fbdc9.jpg

 

Got a working giga h61m but 3 out of 4 of the usb ports are shot and the vga port is also shot, ill have to test the other ports as they may also be broken but how tf am i supposed to test a com port?

 

Getting some replacement ports wont be very hard considering i have 35 boards just laying around with around 20 of em being basically dead and not revivable so i can use those as scrap and scrap some ports off of em

 

honestly thought my mobo count was still around the 20 mark but nope 35 boards with 20 ish fully dead for salvage, 3-4 boards needing major repairs (socket replacement, nb/chipset replacement, vrms, whatever component replacement thats really hard and issues that are hard to fix/troubleshoot) which ill bring back eventually just for fun, and around 10 boards that i can sell with some needing minor repairs (straighten pins, resolder bios chip, etc.)

 

 

One of the ports (upper left) does still work so im pretty sure it isnt the usb controller whichever ic that is, using my keyboard it does light up the led indicator and fully function whereas the other ports the led is completely dead and doesnt work at all, cheap china mouse gets power to the leds from all the ports but the ones that the keyboard dont work in the mouse doesnt work either

 

Vga is also dead and both the igpus in the 2 pentiums i tested this board with (g645, g2030) work just fine on other boards so ill definitely need to replace the vga port

 

Board has already been cleaned with the usual go to of dunking in water then 2 times with some 99% IPA directly to the usb ports and vga port though that only managed to bring the pcie x16 slot back to life (sprayed the x16 slot as i was getting no display from a gpu and the mobo speaker gives a single beep indicating post)

 

 

There are alot of pins which does kinda worry me for difficulty of desoldering and resoldering since for now ill only have 2 cheap "adjustable" solder irons

Spoiler

Screenshot_20230904_113313.thumb.jpg.be1083db9f3cb7e32a9e1ca0244b55cb.jpg

Like this

 

Is this kind of repair even possible with an iron?

 

And should i just buy a heatgun and use that instead to desolder and resolder mobo ports? I mean theyre 8$ so quite affordable now that i have some boards that can be sold

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You won’t be unsoldering anything with a cheapo soldering iron and an industrial heat gun. Working with multilayer PCBs is hard, you have to preheat them to obscene temperatures to be able to even able to get solder melted throughout. 
 

IMHO, you are wasting your time and money attempt to start your soldering experience working on modern circuits. 
 

I also seriously doubt issue is the ports themselves, it’s usually the socket or the traces.

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NO, you will not desolder stuff on motherboards with SHIT soldering irons like that, I told you several times already. 

 

Motherboards are made with lots of layers full of copper that will absorb heat and act like heatsinks, and soldering guns like that are not powerful enough to work. 

 

Get a decent soldering station with at least 50w transformer, it will last you a lifetime.   Even with a soldering station style iron, you'll still want to apply some hot air with a hot air gun or a paint stripping gun or even a hair dryer. 

 

As for desoldering, you want to use FLUX and ADD solder to the retention pins (on vga, on the sides) then use solder sucker to pull out existing solder.  For the pins, a common technique is to cut a bit of solid core wire, put it to it touches a row of pins and add solder so the wire is soldered to the whole row. Repeat for all rows, then once all rows have a wire, you move your iron from wire to wire getting them all hot until you can pull out the connector or it falls out the board.

Same for USB ports. 

 

For USB I would use a multimeter to check continuity first between pins at the bottom and the actual contacts in the usb ports. May be the connectors are fine but some fuse (or esd protection diode or something) is broken instead. 

 

See video below... but again, those cheap soldering irons are not powerful enough to heat all that solder as he does in the video. Don't waste your time without FLUX and proper soldering iron 

 

 

 

 

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I got one of those iron.

Forget precision PCB work with those, like IC chips and what not. But should be "good enough" to solder a port. You will never likely need a heatgun to desolder, though. I have tried desoldering with an iron and a pump before and let me tell you, it's a major pain in the butt.

 

The ports being "shot" seems unlikely to me, unless the pins inside are literally broken. It is more likely whichever chip or the traces on the board they are linked to, is shot. Not the port itself.

Did you test with a multimeter to see if you had about 0Ω or higher from inside the port to the contacts on the pcb at the bottom of the ports?

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16 minutes ago, TetraSky said:

I got one of those iron.

Forget precision PCB work with those, like IC chips and what not. But should be "good enough" to solder a port. You will never likely need a heatgun to desolder, though. I have tried desoldering with an iron and a pump before and let me tell you, it's a major pain in the butt.

 

The ports being "shot" seems unlikely to me, unless the pins inside are literally broken. It is more likely whichever chip or the traces on the board they are linked to, is shot. Not the port itself.

Did you test with a multimeter to see if you had about 0Ω or higher from inside the port to the contacts on the pcb at the bottom of the ports?

Mainly bought the irons to do a basic repair on an x58a ud3r which is just resoldering the main bios chip hence why i bought 2

 

Mostly just basic repairs and stuff, ofc i wont expect to desolder vrms with these, the tips are swappable so later on ill buy one of those really pointy tips and use these for voltmodding and some other shenanigans, stuff thats as simple as soldering a thin wire, moving a resistor (x58 pcie mod), desoldering smds not connected to a power plane (anything not vrms)

 

28 minutes ago, mariushm said:

For USB I would use a multimeter to check continuity first between pins at the bottom and the actual contacts in the usb ports. May be the connectors are fine but some fuse (or esd protection diode or something) is broken instead. 

Shit why did i not think of that

ill need a multimeter anyways since i plan on screwing around with voltmods

 

Spoiler

Screenshot_20231128_213348.thumb.jpg.e3af170e7a38954c5b5273ff732e4e5f.jpg

I honestly dont know what the hell im actually looking for when buying a multimeter so this is pretty much the first thing that comes to mind

 

Spoiler

Screenshot_20231128_213604.thumb.jpg.a015353c1465661533129a6105678aaf.jpg

Another interesting one

 

 

37 minutes ago, mariushm said:

Get a decent soldering station with at least 50w transformer, it will last you a lifetime.   Even with a soldering station style iron, you'll still want to apply some hot air with a hot air gun or a paint stripping gun or even a hair dryer. 

Does a hair dryer really get that hot?

Buncha heatguns for 8$ so those will probs do

 

But if i get a soldering station id problabaly want 2 for double irons when i need em for stuff like bios chips or whatever smds that need more than 1 point that needs heat to be applied, though the soldering station itself is just a control board hooked up to a heating element right?

 

Spoiler

Screenshot_20230904_140219.thumb.jpg.4969f66682cf41d4ab0e42a71e27657d.jpg

I assume that connector is just for the heating element so all id have to do is just solder on another connector and id have 2 irons on 1 soldering station

 

But are 936 any good? Ik theyre better than these cheap irons but ive heard that t12 stations are better, so if im gonna spend some real cash might aswell get the best thing if it isnt that much more (around 20-30$ for these)

 

If i did go with this pcb however what else would i need to buy?

 

 

45 minutes ago, mariushm said:

As for desoldering, you want to use FLUX and ADD solder to the retention pins (on vga, on the sides) then use solder sucker to pull out existing solder.  For the pins, a common technique is to cut a bit of solid core wire, put it to it touches a row of pins and add solder so the wire is soldered to the whole row. Repeat for all rows, then once all rows have a wire, you move your iron from wire to wire getting them all hot until you can pull out the connector or it falls out the board.

Same for USB ports. 

Already have flux

Ive also got some low temp 138c solder paste so i guess i can problably use that instead

 

As for the wire i have some mechanic stuff, looking online this should still be pretty decent, i do have existing solder wire but thats just some cheap crap i got for <1$

 

49 minutes ago, mariushm said:

See video below... but again, those cheap soldering irons are not powerful enough to heat all that solder as he does in the video. Don't waste your time without FLUX and proper soldering iron 

And whose stupid enough to actually not use flux for desoldering, even me the complete noob knows you need to use flux =p

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4 hours ago, Somerandomtechyboi said:
  Hide contents

Screenshot_20231128_213348.thumb.jpg.e3af170e7a38954c5b5273ff732e4e5f.jpg

I honestly dont know what the hell im actually looking for when buying a multimeter so this is pretty much the first thing that comes to mind

  Hide contents

Screenshot_20231128_213604.thumb.jpg.a015353c1465661533129a6105678aaf.jpg

Another interesting one

 

As long as the multi meter is True RMS, it should be fine. It is what we were told to get when I was in school for it.

https://www.rockwellautomation.com/en-us/company/news/magazines/why-is-true-rms-so-important-.html

Meaning the blue one would be ok, the yellow one not so much.

 

 

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True RMS is not a necessary feature for a beginner multimeter.   That's only needed if you measure AC voltages often, and has to do with multimeter being able to measure AC voltages that are not quite pure sinewave correctly.... 

It does not affect continuity, DC voltage measurement , resistance measurement and other things.

 

What you want to look for is reasonable accuracy (for example 1% on DC measurement can be achieved by pretty much anything, 0.5% or less would be better), 1% or better on resistance, a good continuity mode (should beep as soon as you touch the leads together, some meters take up to 1-2 seconds).

 

I would suggest focusing on more established brands of multimeters, some of the more budget ones being Aneng and Uni-T

 

Uni-T UT890D+ at 25EUR seems OK, very good feature set for money ... and again, think of it like not buying 3-4 multimeters over the next years, it's a meter that should last you a long time, 10 years+.

It's 6000 count, true rms, diode mode, capacitance (though it's kinda pointless), ac and dc voltage/current, frequency measurement, hfe (also pointless), min/max, hold, backlight, ncv (detect high voltage in proximity), uA, mA, A ranges... etc etc

 

banggood link : https://www.banggood.com/UNI-T-UT890D+-True-RMS-Digital-Multimeter-Manual-Range-AC-DC-Current-Voltage-Frequency-Capacitance-Tester-with-Backlight-p-1981846.html?cur_warehouse=CN&rmmds=search

 

22$ + vat at tme.eu but doubt they ship to where you live : https://www.tme.eu/en/details/ut890d+/portable-digital-multimeters/uni-t/

 

 

The UT33 series is cheaper but avoid it, because it doesn't have some features you'd use, like diode mode, min/max, no AC current measurement, some weak fuses , it's basically a low voltage meter. Aneng meters have more features at the price range of UT33 series.

 

 

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2 hours ago, mariushm said:

True RMS is not a necessary feature for a beginner multimeter.   That's only needed if you measure AC voltages often, and has to do with multimeter being able to measure AC voltages that are not quite pure sinewave correctly.... 

It does not affect continuity, DC voltage measurement , resistance measurement and other things.

 

What you want to look for is reasonable accuracy (for example 1% on DC measurement can be achieved by pretty much anything, 0.5% or less would be better), 1% or better on resistance, a good continuity mode (should beep as soon as you touch the leads together, some meters take up to 1-2 seconds).

 

I would suggest focusing on more established brands of multimeters, some of the more budget ones being Aneng and Uni-T

 

Uni-T UT890D+ at 25EUR seems OK, very good feature set for money ... and again, think of it like not buying 3-4 multimeters over the next years, it's a meter that should last you a long time, 10 years+.

It's 6000 count, true rms, diode mode, capacitance (though it's kinda pointless), ac and dc voltage/current, frequency measurement, hfe (also pointless), min/max, hold, backlight, ncv (detect high voltage in proximity), uA, mA, A ranges... etc etc

 

banggood link : https://www.banggood.com/UNI-T-UT890D+-True-RMS-Digital-Multimeter-Manual-Range-AC-DC-Current-Voltage-Frequency-Capacitance-Tester-with-Backlight-p-1981846.html?cur_warehouse=CN&rmmds=search

 

22$ + vat at tme.eu but doubt they ship to where you live : https://www.tme.eu/en/details/ut890d+/portable-digital-multimeters/uni-t/

 

 

The UT33 series is cheaper but avoid it, because it doesn't have some features you'd use, like diode mode, min/max, no AC current measurement, some weak fuses , it's basically a low voltage meter. Aneng meters have more features at the price range of UT33 series.

Screenshot_20231129_070717.thumb.jpg.663ab7c048bd0bdf3161c49c09177aa0.jpg

 

Yea dont need to order from china when indo has eshops that also ship the same stuff

 

Screenshot_20231129_070858.thumb.jpg.e7e7e37342981d8f82b222ead881eb3c.jpg

 

The ut33 is abit less than half of the ut890d but im curious as to what aneng has to offer for the same price, prefferably something thats abit cheaper than the ut890d

 

also aneng looks to just be a rebrand of generic china models like the aformentioned dt9205 but if the brand tax isnt much i dont mind

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Rule UT33 (without +) series out of your mind, it's not good for you, for your needs. it doesn't have some functions that are very useful like diode mode. It's more like a multimeter to have in your car, to measure battery voltage, basic stuff like that.

 

The one with PLUS at the end seems to be with a different multimeter chip, that does have diode mode but I didn't see a review to know if they're good or not. 

 

UT33C+ has temperature measurement (if you get a K probe separately, not sure it's included in package)  , UT33D+ drops temperature for NCV, so if you want to go cheap UT33C+ could be OK I guess. I still say it's worth saving money to go for the 25-30$ UT890D+ , as I said really good mix of features for the money.  But again, it must be PLUS, don't like your sellers on that tokopedia writing one model in title but picture of other meter or the version with + in model. 

 

For Aneng, see maybe Aneng AN8001 or  Aneng AN8002  (both use same chip inside, seems AN8002 has temperature reading and maybe comes with a cheap K probe in package). 

 

Should be around $20 or less.

 

Review here for AN8002 : https://lygte-info.dk/review/DMMAnengAN8002 UK.html

or video 

 

 

Aneng AN8008 is a bit better (10,000 count vs 6,000 count)  but at this price point, UT890D+ I suggested above is much better, more features better internal construction, better protections inside (fuses and all that), better everything. 

It was reviewed on eevblog a few years ago 

 

 

 

 

 

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14 minutes ago, mariushm said:

Rule UT33 (without +) series out of your mind, it's not good for you, for your needs. it doesn't have some functions that are very useful like diode mode. It's more like a multimeter to have in your car, to measure battery voltage, basic stuff like that.

 

The one with PLUS at the end seems to be with a different multimeter chip, that does have diode mode but I didn't see a review to know if they're good or not. 

 

UT33C+ has temperature measurement (if you get a K probe separately, not sure it's included in package)  , UT33D+ drops temperature for NCV, so if you want to go cheap UT33C+ could be OK I guess. I still say it's worth saving money to go for the 25-30$ UT890D+ , as I said really good mix of features for the money.  But again, it must be PLUS, don't like your sellers on that tokopedia writing one model in title but picture of other meter or the version with + in model. 

Screenshot_20231129_152046.thumb.jpg.615fd50dc2ac4010e71f96a9084478aa.jpg

 

Looking at customer reviews these are indeed ut33d+

 

What does ncv do anyways?

 

For temperature id just get a dedicated sensor instead and/or one of those temperature guns but i wont see any use out of that till i build some sort of subzero cooling thingy and/or start reflowing or desoldering bga which will be quite a ways away aside from reflow since i do have a gts 250 that doesnt wanna work with its driver but i think ill buy a diff card thats cheap and single slot first

 

 

Those aneng multimeters are stupid overpriced here so nope not an option

 

Any major diffs between the ut33d+ and the ut890d+?  Id prefer a cheaper multimeter since i can just buy a better one in the future when i have some extra cash laying around and im not too serious about electronics yet, mainly interested in voltmodding mobos (just soldering a trimpot to the feedback pin of a voltage regulator chip), probing computer components (mainly mobos and possibly gpus) for troubleshooting + modding (like reading volts resistance and whatnot), and some other stuff like using a buck/boost converter for fans or something like that

 

In the future i would like to start playing around with making electronic circuits and problably screwing around with power supplies cause i do have a future project in mind that would need a power supply or 2

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NCV is no contact voltage detection. You put the sensor of the meter close to a wire (inside a wall for example) and it detects if AC voltage runs through it. 

 

UT33D+ is a 2000 count multimeter, which means you get less decimals as the voltage increases compared to a 6,000 or 10,000 count multimeter ... you get 3 decimals only up to 2v (ex 1999mV) , then you get 2 decimals up to 20v, then only 1 decimal above 20v.  With 6000 or 10000 count meter, you get more decimals.

 

So UT890D+ is 6000 count vs 2000 count, so you get more decimals where you may care (under 6v), and can also measure AC current, UT33D+ can't.  It's a bit more precise at measuring AC voltages (1.2% vs 0.8%) and also has capacitance measurement and hFe but these two are kind of pointless as I said.

It's got Frequency measurement, which in some cases it can be useful (for example measure freq. of an oscillator or crystal to see if a chipset runs or not, but it doesn't always work, depends on some things)  

You also get REL (useful to rule out the resistance of the actual probes when measuring very small resistors, you short the leads and press REL to have 0 on display then you measure small value components) and MIN / MAX features 

 

edit no mention if ut33d+ is true rms or not, probably isn't.  As I said, that matters only when you measure AC voltages and means the measurement may not be correct if the AC is not a nice sinewave (like for example ac voltage coming out a cheap inverter or ups may be simulated sine wave and in that case, the meter may not measure that AC voltage correctly because it does the math thinking it's sine wave AC)

 

If you really don't have money or can't stretch to 890d+, like I said, UT33D+ would be ok for you, it's still several times better than some cheap 5-10$ aneng or those 2$ 830b noname meters.

 

 

image.png.8ed0f6714714bf52c02a783e07b4ccac.png

 

image.png.14f8458d095ba16bfbfaf61b7c5e3e7e.png

image.png.950b0d5a6d449636517bb5c07d27dfa6.png

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2 hours ago, mariushm said:

UT33D+ is a 2000 count multimeter, which means you get less decimals as the voltage increases compared to a 6,000 or 10,000 count multimeter ... you get 3 decimals only up to 2v (ex 1999mV) , then you get 2 decimals up to 20v, then only 1 decimal above 20v.  With 6000 or 10000 count meter, you get more decimals.

Anything over 2v doesnt really need to be precise for me since thats already close to death zone for cpus/gpus and if im pushing those kinds of volts through my rams also not gonna have to be particularly precise either cause if it scales to that volt its probs gonna be somewhat tolerant to not setting an exact volt and i wont really need more than 2 decimals anyways above 2v as thats precise enough for what im doing

 

2 hours ago, mariushm said:

It's got Frequency measurement, which in some cases it can be useful (for example measure freq. of an oscillator or crystal to see if a chipset runs or not, but it doesn't always work, depends on some things)  

Troubleshooting a chipset by checking the crystal? I mean i have encountered boards with some very odd problems that i cant fix by just dunking in water so i wonder if dead clk light is because dead chipset or something else thats dead, doesnt sound that useful for now

 

2 hours ago, mariushm said:

You also get REL (useful to rule out the resistance of the actual probes when measuring very small resistors, you short the leads and press REL to have 0 on display then you measure small value components) and MIN / MAX features 

This does sound useful but dont resistors usually have their resistance value visible with small text?

 

And i may be able to just use math to determine actual resistance by looking at the diff between values

 

What does min max do?

 

2 hours ago, mariushm said:

edit no mention if ut33d+ is true rms or not, probably isn't.  As I said, that matters only when you measure AC voltages and means the measurement may not be correct if the AC is not a nice sinewave (like for example ac voltage coming out a cheap inverter or ups may be simulated sine wave and in that case, the meter may not measure that AC voltage correctly because it does the math thinking it's sine wave AC)

Wont be fucking around with AC mains voltage till i start actually building my own circuits and screwing around with powersupplies so wont need that for now

 

 

For 9$ seems to have basically all the features i need, and if i do end up replacing it ill probs just give it away to a friend or something

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