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EFI System Partition on two drives, one being the wrong drive

arthurson
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Sandisk z400s SSD I have installed in the following configuration:

SSD -> Sabrent SATA-to-USB adapter -> 4-in-1 Sabrent USB Hub -> USB front header on the case
 

Is there a way I can remove the EFI partition or clean the drive without corrupting future Windows updates?  Also, is there a reason that Windows did not automatically install those other partitions but on my other internal side-SSD plugged into the power supply via SATA?

 

BIOS says that the Sandisk SSD is also showing (Windows Boot Manager)

 

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It sounds like you have an EFI system partition on a USB-connected SSD and another one on an internal SSD. This is not ideal, as the EFI system partition should be on the same drive as the Windows installation.

To fix this, you can try moving the EFI system partition from the USB-connected SSD to the internal SSD. This can be done by using the diskpart utility in Windows. First, open a command prompt as an administrator and run the following commands:

  1. diskpart
  2. list disk
  3. select disk <disk number> (replace <disk number> with the number of the USB-connected SSD)
  4. list partition
  5. select partition <partition number> (replace <partition number> with the number of the EFI system partition)
  6. remove

This will remove the EFI system partition from the USB-connected SSD. You can then create a new EFI system partition on the internal SSD by following these steps:

  1. diskpart
  2. list disk
  3. select disk <disk number> (replace <disk number> with the number of the internal SSD)
  4. create partition efi
  5. format fs=fat32 quick
  6. assign

Once the EFI system partition has been moved to the internal SSD, you should be able to boot into Windows without any issues.

It's not clear why Windows did not automatically create the other partitions on the internal SSD, but it's possible that the SSD was not properly initialized or formatted. If you continue to have problems, you may need to reinstall Windows on the internal SSD to ensure that all necessary partitions are created.

It's also worth noting that modifying the EFI system partition can potentially cause problems with future Windows updates, so you should proceed with caution and make sure you have a backup of your important data before making any changes.

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1 hour ago, Linus No Beard said:

It sounds like you have an EFI system partition on a USB-connected SSD and another one on an internal SSD. This is not ideal, as the EFI system partition should be on the same drive as the Windows installation.

To fix this, you can try moving the EFI system partition from the USB-connected SSD to the internal SSD. This can be done by using the diskpart utility in Windows. First, open a command prompt as an administrator and run the following commands:

  1. diskpart
  2. list disk
  3. select disk <disk number> (replace <disk number> with the number of the USB-connected SSD)
  4. list partition
  5. select partition <partition number> (replace <partition number> with the number of the EFI system partition)
  6. remove

This will remove the EFI system partition from the USB-connected SSD. You can then create a new EFI system partition on the internal SSD by following these steps:

  1. diskpart
  2. list disk
  3. select disk <disk number> (replace <disk number> with the number of the internal SSD)
  4. create partition efi
  5. format fs=fat32 quick
  6. assign

Once the EFI system partition has been moved to the internal SSD, you should be able to boot into Windows without any issues.

It's not clear why Windows did not automatically create the other partitions on the internal SSD, but it's possible that the SSD was not properly initialized or formatted. If you continue to have problems, you may need to reinstall Windows on the internal SSD to ensure that all necessary partitions are created.

It's also worth noting that modifying the EFI system partition can potentially cause problems with future Windows updates, so you should proceed with caution and make sure you have a backup of your important data before making any changes.

Hi @Linus No Beardthanks for helping out.  Would this still be done even though I already have an EFI partition on my native boot drive (Disk 1)?  
 

"This is not ideal, as the EFI system partition should be on the same drive as the Windows installation." -> It is though.  And to be clear I have two (2) EFI partitions in total.  One already on the native boot drive which is normal, and a second one, on the USB-connected SSD.

 

Are you saying to take the USB-connected EFI partition, remove it from disk 2, and then move it to disk 1?  Resulting in two (2) EFI partitions on Disk 1?

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2 hours ago, arthurson said:

Hi @Linus No Beardthanks for helping out.  Would this still be done even though I already have an EFI partition on my native boot drive (Disk 1)?  
 

"This is not ideal, as the EFI system partition should be on the same drive as the Windows installation." -> It is though.  And to be clear I have two (2) EFI partitions in total.  One already on the native boot drive which is normal, and a second one, on the USB-connected SSD.

 

Are you saying to take the USB-connected EFI partition, remove it from disk 2, and then move it to disk 1?  Resulting in two (2) EFI partitions on Disk 1?

You should be able to just remove the one on the usb then if you have one on your boot drive though you might have another OS on that drive if so you can leave it

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