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Is it good to lower performance when idle?

Lately I am thinking that my laptop should throttle the performance down when idle. Of course, I can set my power mode to balanced, but that only works on battery, and I keep my laptop on charging all the time. I am doing this because I think that it should improve my laptop's life span a bit when throttled down at idle, what do you think? But the problem is that neither balanced, nor power saver work when laptop is on charging. Is there any way I can get these to work in charging? Or maybe I can just Throttlestop to limit CPU clock speed, but that only adjusts CPU clock speed and not the rest of the power saving.

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@NvidiaFirePro6900XXTX3DPRO

 

If you have the C states enabled, Intel CPUs automatically power gate and throttle down internally. Unused cores will enter the core C7 state where they are disconnected from the voltage rail and they are disconnected from the internal clock so they are sitting dormant at 0 MHz and 0 volts. When a computer is idle at the desktop, the individual cores can be averaging 99% of their time in this low power state.

 

Here are 10 cores humming along at a steady 5000 MHz whether the CPU is idle or loaded. Idle temperatures and power consumption are extremely low because the cores are idle in C7. No need to idle anything to improve the life span of your laptop. If you have an Intel CPU, it is quite capable of looking after itself. 

 

image.png.8893abc168087310b116792b06bd0827.png

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@unclewebb

 

I don't know a lot of C states, but it still looks like it doesn't completely power down the cores when unused. What I actually mean is that my "idle" definition is actually have a tab in browser opened which has some information and the most intensive thing I will be doing is to scroll through the page. And even this C state and all might be working fine, if you see the clock frequency, it tries to keep it at the max, and the fact that I can the hear the loud coil whine in my laptop is still quite discomforting. Discomforting in not the sense of the sound, but the feeling that my device is just pumping of all that performance when it is not needed at all. I know that I am sounding a bit ridiculous, but it's those things which you know are okay, but you feel something different or odd about it.

 

I at least can clock my CPU down using Throttlestop, but that's not everything about power saving. If you have any more tips which would throttle the CPU down and let it work at ease, then kindly let me know. Something like undervolting and perhaps limiting CPU power is what I am looking after. As I said, I might only me scrolling through a webpage, I would not mind have a bit sluggish experience, but I should be able to increase the performance output whenever I want, say when I am playing a game or something.

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1 hour ago, unclewebb said:

@NvidiaFirePro6900XXTX3DPRO

 

If you have the C states enabled, Intel CPUs automatically power gate and throttle down internally. Unused cores will enter the core C7 state where they are disconnected from the voltage rail and they are disconnected from the internal clock so they are sitting dormant at 0 MHz and 0 volts. When a computer is idle at the desktop, the individual cores can be averaging 99% of their time in this low power state.

 

Here are 10 cores humming along at a steady 5000 MHz whether the CPU is idle or loaded. Idle temperatures and power consumption are extremely low because the cores are idle in C7. No need to idle anything to improve the life span of your laptop. If you have an Intel CPU, it is quite capable of looking after itself. 

 

image.png.8893abc168087310b116792b06bd0827.png

 

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