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RAM dilemma

I got 2x ram, 16gb 3200 and 8gb 2400. Should I just nick the slower memory or is more memory the better? I use my computer to make content on the internet, video editing and such.

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Does 2x ram 16gb 3200 and 8gb 2400 mean 16+8 or 2x16 + 8?

 

In general you want two RAM sticks to get dual channel, but they should be the same size and speed. If you have 32 GB (2x16) there's no real benefit to an extra 8 GB, especially if they're so much slower, since that will force all sticks to run at the slow speed.

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1 hour ago, Eigenvektor said:

Does 2x ram 16gb 3200 and 8gb 2400 mean 16+8 or 2x16 + 8?

 

In general you want two RAM sticks to get dual channel, but they should be the same size and speed. If you have 32 GB (2x16) there's no real benefit to an extra 8 GB, especially if they're so much slower, since that will force all sticks to run at the slow speed.

yeah, 16+8, 3200 and 2400 respectively I bought the 8gb way way back then added 16gb as an upgrade; currently I'm running 24gb at 2400 I should use proper punctuations next time 🤦‍♂️

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The 2400 Mhz ram stick will force the other two ram sticks to run at 2400 Mhz as well. 

IF you don't use applications that use more than 16 GB of memory, or you don't play at game at resolutions and super high quality settings that would cause game to use more than 16 GB, then the processor may give you less performance.

 

It depends on the CPU, older Intel generations didn't care so much about the frequency, they worked fine with 2400 or 2666 Mhz, newer generations will work better with 3000-3600 Mhz.

Ryzen processors benefit from faster memory, there's noticeable performance increases between 2400 and all the way up to 3200 Mhz  and the ideal frequency for ram would be 3600 Mhz (but the performance increases between 3200 and 3600 are quite small)

 

If you have a Ryzen processor, you're probably better off staying with the 16 GB 3200 Mhz sticks, leave the 8 GB 2400 Mhz out.

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2 minutes ago, mariushm said:

The 2400 Mhz ram stick will force the other two ram sticks to run at 2400 Mhz as well. 

IF you don't use applications that use more than 16 GB of memory, or you don't play at game at resolutions and super high quality settings that would cause game to use more than 16 GB, then the processor may give you less performance.

 

It depends on the CPU, older Intel generations didn't care so much about the frequency, they worked fine with 2400 or 2666 Mhz, newer generations will work better with 3000-3600 Mhz.

Ryzen processors benefit from faster memory, there's noticeable performance increases between 2400 and all the way up to 3200 Mhz  and the ideal frequency for ram would be 3600 Mhz (but the performance increases between 3200 and 3600 are quite small)

 

If you have a Ryzen processor, you're probably better off staying with the 16 GB 3200 Mhz sticks, leave the 8 GB 2400 Mhz out.

I think he meant he only has 2 sticks, one is 16gb 3200mhz, the other is 8gb 2400mhz.
Taking off one will make him lose dual channel.

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Ah ok,  in that case I agree, the performance benefit from having dual channel is more significant than  frequency,  so even though both sticks will run at 2400 Mhz, it's still better than having a single stick of memory in your computer. 

 

If it's just two sticks in total, then yeah, keep both sticks in the system as they'll run in dual channel mode (8 out of the 16 GB from the 16 GB stick , with the 8 GB from the second stick will work in "dual channel" mode)

 

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