Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Debating if my seagate barracuda is better than wd blue hdd

I have a 500gb seagate barracuda and a 1tb wd blue hdd, and not sure which is better in terms of everything. can anyone give me advice which is better. i know 1tb is good as storage for files and vid or etc. while 500gb is also decent storage space with seagate as another good brand

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The brand doesn't really matter. I'm guessing these are both older drives you have. Run CrystalDiskInfo and check both drives for things such as errors/bad sectors, total write count, hours on time, and date of manufacturer (should be printed on the drive label). There's also software that can do more thorough testing like Seagate's Seatools (WD probably has similar software as well) that can check for bad sectors. If both drives don't show any errors and don't have 500,000 hours on them then just use the 1TB drive since it offers more storage.

Edited by Spotty

CPU: Intel i7 6700k  | Motherboard: Gigabyte Z170x Gaming 5 | RAM: 2x16GB 3000MHz Corsair Vengeance LPX | GPU: Gigabyte Aorus GTX 1080ti | PSU: Corsair RM750x (2018) | Case: BeQuiet SilentBase 800 | Cooler: Arctic Freezer 34 eSports | SSD: Samsung 970 Evo 500GB + Samsung 840 500GB + Crucial MX500 2TB | Monitor: Acer Predator XB271HU + Samsung BX2450

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had loads of WD Blue drives and have had nothing but smiles. 

On the other hand I've seen an old Dell Inspiron laptop much through drives like candy about 1/yr and it found Seagate drives particularly tasty. Both have ups and downs, really depends on amount of use.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

my experience tells me that seagates seem to fail more than WD's, but (excluding the 3TB barracuda, some of the sshd's, and that one faulty 10TB sku) none of it is really worryingly far out if proportion.

 

having that said, seagates seem to pretty much all have the same mode of failure: a very slow mechanical death that announces itself far before data becomes unrecoverable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×