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Why is it RGB and not RYB

now my sister had a good point. earlier se asked what rgb was when I showed her one of linus's videos. and he said something about rgb. so I explained that is basically just a cool selling point to pop out and some people use it to make there pcs look cool. so a while later like maybe a week she then says why is it rgb when it would be more balanced as RYB? R o Y g B uv. is she right? or am I missing something I know it sounds better but that's because RGB is familiar so people begin to become accustomed to it. like the feet mile inch Isystem. its Dogwater yet people still use it.

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RGB is for a additive color system, and RYB and CMYK is for subtractive color spaces.

 

Also think of printers like painting. They use CMYK to represent most colors, as it often provides better colors than RYB, but depends on exactly what your doing. 

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Posted (edited)

r is red g is green and b is blue and mixing them can make 16 million colors thow your eyes will only see a fraction of that. now there is a w for white because making white with the rgb dont not come out as clean. of cores there are warm light and cold light as well. as well as uv. thow i dont think there's a mb with uv header but you can still plug a vu in if you wanted.

 

now argb addressable just means each led (smd) has a chip that tells each led to have a serten color so multi colors per strip.  cheap strips its every 3 leds per chip and more expensive strips has one each led.

 

rgb animations can only do brightness/ fade, blink well argb could have an animation per led as well as a color.

 

in say paint class they use red yellow and blue to mix colors and white and black to make it darker / lighter. my guess the yellow didn't work right but i dont really no that question.

Edited by thrasher_565
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2 hours ago, Derp_Thing_YT said:

now my sister had a good point. earlier se asked what rgb was when I showed her one of linus's videos. and he said something about rgb. so I explained that is basically just a cool selling point to pop out and some people use it to make there pcs look cool. so a while later like maybe a week she then says why is it rgb when it would be more balanced as RYB? R o Y g B uv. is she right? or am I missing something I know it sounds better but that's because RGB is familiar so people begin to become accustomed to it. like the feet mile inch Isystem. its Dogwater yet people still use it.

roygbiv, not roygbuv. Not sure if it was a typo on your part, but its Indigo/violet, not ultraviolet.

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RYB isn't a very good way for mixing colors. It doesn't really work and it SHOULDN'T even be taught anymore.

CMYK is a MUCH better way.
This would be Cyan (a blue-green color), Magenta (almost like a bright purple), Yellow and blacK (just because it's hard to mix the other 3 well to get a dark color - though this results in a somewhat washed out color).

CMY works by ABSORBING light.

The mirror of CMY would be RGB. RGB works by EMITTING light and reading in the emitted light. Some displays also copy the trick used in printing and have RGBW displays as pure white is hard to do for those displays (though this results in a somewhat washed out color).

Biologically we have R, G and B cones in our eyes.

 

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11 hours ago, emosun said:

because it's light , not pigment

thanks thats sort of what I thought my sister half forced me to post this I will show this to her lol

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You (or she) might like this video:

 

 

Dell owns my soul.

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The simple reason is because the human eye implements three loose color receptors, and one sensitive brightness receptor.

 

Screens try their best to match their emission spectrum with the human eye sensitivity spectrum, and RGB happens to be a cheap good way to do it.

 

6iOu8.png

RGB-spectra-illustrating-I-l-versus-wavelength-The-slit-width-for-this-figure-was-5-m.png

 

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RGB and CMYK are legacy constructs that aren't based on any real physical law. They were just convenient in their application. The visual spectrum isn't a circle, but they get the job done. Aggravates me to no end when people call white a color. LED engineers can get an approximate white light using just orange and blue, but standards stepped in and minimum CRI standards apply even though an orange/blue LED source would be hugely efficient....at 50 CRI 🙂

 

There's 628nm red, which is what most displays and LEDs emit, and 660nm red which looks way different, but due to our reduced sensitivity isn't used as much in modern devices.

 

Biggest practical limit with RGB is in camera sensors. Those three cutoffs aren't sufficient for capturing a proper gamut, but camera sensors can get close enough to interpolate whats going on. 

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