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hey guys i was trying to understand voltage ripple in psu can you help me

hey guys i was trying to understand voltage ripple can you help me regarding this. so i watched gamer nexus video and read some online articles onc928bec208795748b8a9d347940d2c25777777777777.thumb.png.7a205dfaf3b7b079b51fa6c200d2acdd.png voltage ripple in psu and it was clashing with my knowledge to electronics what i can understand from gamer nexus video is C is voltage ripple in psu ( check the picture below ) but from my knowledge a A should be voltage ripple before putting load on pc and B should be voltage ripple after putting load on pc. am i worng about this? plz correct me

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4 minutes ago, dead gamer said:

but from my knowledge a A should be voltage ripple before putting load on pc and B should be voltage ripple after putting load on pc.

That seems right to me based on the provided information. C would represent Vdroop.

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4 minutes ago, Hairless Monkey Boy said:

That seems right to me based on the provided information. C would represent Vdroop.

thanks

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Not to criticise, just to add insight:

From the point of view of components drawing power, they don't care about the cause, just the drop, so that would be C

The thing we use to "smooth" the voltage is stored energy, when there is a greater load on the PSU (as in your B section) you would expect the troughs in the supply waveform to be deeper than in section A as the stored energy is being depleted quicker. Let me see if i can find an old bridge rec image to explain... 

Here, read this from the "The Smoothing Capacitor" section, where they compare the difference between a 50µF and 5µF cap << That's the sort of effect you get when adding additional load.

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30 minutes ago, Ralphred said:

Not to criticise, just to add insight:

From the point of view of components drawing power, they don't care about the cause, just the drop, so that would be C

The thing we use to "smooth" the voltage is stored energy, when there is a greater load on the PSU (as in your B section) you would expect the troughs in the supply waveform to be deeper than in section A as the stored energy is being depleted quicker. Let me see if i can find an old bridge rec image to explain... 

Here, read this from the "The Smoothing Capacitor" section, where they compare the difference between a 50µF and 5µF cap << That's the sort of effect you get when adding additional load.

thanks

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29 minutes ago, James Evens said:

You always need to ask at which conditions the measured was done. It can make a significant different if you have no load at all or some load. In worst case scenarios your regulation can completely break down without any load resulting in gigantic ripple/oscillation.

What noise figure you measure also depends on the bandwidth that's why, if there is no competing requirement,  it is done at 20 MHz. To make matters worse this kind of measurement is sensitive to proper probing and choosing the right point.

 

in the picture C would be transient response but normally you expect the voltage to slowly go up again.  From a random Texas Instrument datasheet:

image.png.b2080848f23f38e6c34cd0b7090dfca3.png

 

Some notes on "tricks" manufacturer have used in the past:

Silverstone in the past had an additional sense wire.

Corsair still has on some PSUs "small" capacitors at the connector.

 

One solution would be GPU manufacturer upgrading there power deliver to smooth out the transient. Generally the issue is you might loose efficiency (extra heat you need to deal with) and or requirement to use a additional PCB area for the filtering.

thanks

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