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Does SSD brand matter much in 2022?

Hey all, it's been a while since I've followed tech and this forum and I see most 1TB SSD are pretty damn cheap now. That said, why how tech changes so much every year I'd like to confirm about this. All the brands seem to be of similar price so does any brand in particular matter more? For example, I have some good name brand choices that are similar price below. I'm in Canada BTW so this is CAD currency. Right looking at my choices I'd go for the Kingston one. 

 

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Brand doesn't really matter, but model does, though most of the time (but not always) Samsung SSD's are pretty overpriced like in this case. Between these I'd say get the MX500 or SN770.

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CPU: i5-10400F | GPU: Powercolor RX 6600 Fighter 8gb | SSD: Crucial MX500 500gb | HDD: Seagate Barracuda 2tb | PSU: Corsair RM650x (2018) | Motherboard: ASRock B460M Pro4 | Case: Antec DP301M

 

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Reliability is the main thing - I've had bad luck with NAND endurance on Kingston's SSDs.

I'm not a professional, just an enthusiast. I don't know everything.

HGST Ultrastar: The last HDD you'll ever need to buy (and the one I always recommend).

Schrödinger's CPU: The Q9650. Is it irrelevant? Is it not? 

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Things I look at in order of importance:

1. Spec. Is it big enough for what I need? Is it running TLC or QLC? Is it M.2 NVMe or SATA 2.5" (and does it really matter for what I want to do)?

2. Warranty length. This is the big one. No company is going to put a five-year warranty on a part they expect to be dead in one. Likewise, no company is going to put a one-year warranty on a product they designed to last ten. The companies you'd usually label as the "best" also tend to have the longest warranties.

3. Price. How much do I really need to spend to get what I need out of an SSD for the application I have in mind?

 

That second one is a huge deal, and I don't think enough people out there pay attention to that. They just see a no-name 1TB SSD from China for $64.99 and buy three of them without noticing the one-year limited warranty, then are shocked when all three are dead within 18 months.

bang bang go the dropping frames, man

wipe all the Macs that don't agree

max out the settings at 4K now

a 3090's what I need

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11 minutes ago, Mel0nMan said:

Reliability is the main thing - I've had bad luck with NAND endurance on Kingston's SSDs.

Kingston will never earn their way out of my personal shitlist after what they pulled in 2015. You probably remember, but they got caught sending review units of their new SSD out that used completely, entirely different parts from literally anything you could possibly find in the wild. As a result, the review units were awesome, and the SSDs you could actually buy were terrible. I will not buy from a company that engages in that sort of behavior, period, full stop.

bang bang go the dropping frames, man

wipe all the Macs that don't agree

max out the settings at 4K now

a 3090's what I need

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Brand doesn't matter, DRAM cache does. Then there's also SLC/MLT/TLC/QLC. Check your model see if it has DRAM, because the cheapest bottom tier usually don't, while the difference in deciding between SSDs at mid tier is which one is on sale.

 

I think among the selection here, the MX500 is best value.

If you found my answer to your post helpful, be sure to react or mark it as solution 😄

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1 minute ago, aisle9 said:

Kingston will never earn their way out of my personal shitlist after what they pulled in 2015. You probably remember, but they got caught sending review units of their new SSD out that used completely, entirely different parts from literally anything you could possibly find in the wild. As a result, the review units were awesome, and the SSDs you could actually buy were terrible. I will not buy from a company that engages in that sort of behavior, period, full stop.

Bought and installed one of their 240gb SSDs in March and it's already at 88% life. It's just my boot drive, files and applications are stored on a different drive, even my temp folder is on an NVME. So basically nothing is getting written to it, and it's dying for some reason... meanwhile my other solid state drives have 10+tb written and they're still at 100%.

I'm not a professional, just an enthusiast. I don't know everything.

HGST Ultrastar: The last HDD you'll ever need to buy (and the one I always recommend).

Schrödinger's CPU: The Q9650. Is it irrelevant? Is it not? 

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There is increasingly less difference in mainstream consumer SSDs as the technology becomes commoditized and profit margins level.

 

The most substantial difference is not DRAM, or warranty. The leap in reliability between consumer vs data center grade SSD is still massive, and you pay for it. 

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2 hours ago, wseaton said:

There is increasingly less difference in mainstream consumer SSDs as the technology becomes commoditized and profit margins level.

 

The most substantial difference is not DRAM, or warranty. The leap in reliability between consumer vs data center grade SSD is still massive, and you pay for it. 

 

is it possible to buy a data center grade SSD and use it in a desktop ?🤔

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Yep.

 

The Intel's are the best, IMO. In fact, I would rather run an Intel DC grade SSD in a server vs a RAID card and more commodity storage. MTF dont lie. If I have a client with the extra budget and they want an additional level of insurance for a critical desktop we don't screw around with consumer SSD. They get a get a DC grade SSD.

 

The biggest differences between DC grade SSDs and consumer SDDs are two things. First, DC and enterprise grade SSDs have much higher guaranteed wear rates. Next, DC / Enterprise SSD's have power fault protection. Consumer SSD doesn;t. First time my desktop lost power suddenly my Samsung EVO 850, which had zero errors started showing piles of SMART errors. No DC grade SSD I've been around has had this problem. 

 

You pay for it though. A 1TB Intel Sata SSD D3-S4510 costs around $270. 

 

Nothing wrong with consumer SSD, but I'm a lot more fussy about backups when running consumer vs DC grade.

 

I wish Linus and crew would do their own stress test on SSDs and confirm this. Be very informative. Not everything is about a few percents of speed improvement.

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20 hours ago, JogerJ said:

Brand doesn't matter, DRAM cache does. Then there's also SLC/MLT/TLC/QLC. Check your model see if it has DRAM, because the cheapest bottom tier usually don't, while the difference in deciding between SSDs at mid tier is which one is on sale.

 

I think among the selection here, the MX500 is best value.

... Also the flash itself (manufacturer, generation, etc.) and the controller are very important. 

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Thanks guys for all the replies. I think I'll go for the Crucial MX500. Was also considering a M.2 nVME but they seem to be as expensive if not more and I loose 2 SATA ports on my motherboard. IMO it's a no brainer to instead go for 2x 2.5 SATA SSDs. Anyone else agrees? Or is there a reason I don't know M.2 nVME would be better? In real world, the speed advantage isn't that important right? 

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53 minutes ago, TheMidnightNarwhal said:

In real world, the speed advantage isn't that important right?

It always depends on what you mean by "real world", the usage. For example, you will notice the difference during a file transfer, especially if you will do it with big files, whereas for gaming the difference is too small to be noticed. It also depends on the models of SSDs, though.

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