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Why doesn’t someone just create an fpga powerful enough to replace general cpus? That would make it so that it can be reprogrammed to be anything that we would want it to be, for example we could have the same cpu dual boot windows and mac os which runs on arm( disclaimer, I am not an engineer in any type of way and this is based on the most basic understanding of what fpga s are)

and don’t answer that the companies will loose revenue is there a purely scientific reason why you cannot make fpga s to replace cpus 

Imagine everything i have written in a Linus Voice/ linus tone (Spock live long and prosper gif here ,idk why tho, i guess i just want to say that i like star trek and am waiting for new seasons of the ongoing shows), But seriously, a lot of what i type only makes sense when said in a Linus tone from an older ltt video (circa 2017-2019) basically before he got a beard and a lot of it should make sense even in a Linus with a beard face.

also note as per the latest typing test on my laptop, my accuracy is 69%

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They can make a FPGA cpu for you if you give them atleast $500 Billion. FPGA ain't cheap and economically viable bro

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CPUs with FPGAs do exist.

15 minutes ago, Indian pc builder said:

mac os which runs on arm

MacOS currently runs on X64 AND Arm64.

15 minutes ago, Indian pc builder said:

we could have the same cpu dual boot windows and mac os

You dont need FPGA do be able to do that.

15 minutes ago, Indian pc builder said:

Why doesn’t someone just create an fpga powerful enough to replace general cpus?

CPUs were technically FPGA's when they first became a thing. They got more optimized in the production and also manufacturer added instructions sets that made it easier to program and optimize your code.

 

Nobody will go through all that trouble to have an FGPA made, program it and have worse performance than consumer cpus while at a higher costs.

 

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The FLEXIBILITY of FPGA adds a HUGE amount of cost to the chip, and to the number of transistors... and makes a FPGA several times more expensive than how much a processor would cost. 

 

Think of a FPGA like a bucket of LEGO pieces - you can build things with the lego pieces but because you have a limited number of shapes in the lego pieces, the items you create will be big and cost a lot because they'll use a lot of lego pieces. 

 

A proper processor has super optimized "lego pieces" (a lot more shapes and sizes and specialized shapes), and the processors are laid out in such a way inside to account even for the maximum distance an electric signal travels between places in the silicon die.  For example, to reach 5 Ghz a certain electrical signal may not be allowed to travel more than 4 mm inside the silicon die and your processor is maybe 20mm by 10 mm ... in contrast a FPGA could be 50 mm by 50 mm in size, but it makes your life even harder because to make a cpu in the fpga you still need to make the "lego puzzle" in the fpga make sure the travel distance of the electrical signal is less than 4mm.

 

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A mentioned an FPGA that could do the same as a modern CPU at the same speed is basically infeasible, what you gain in flexibility you lose in efficiency. You can put a separate FPGA accelerator card in a normal machine for specific functions though, and it's a big thing in datacenter/scientific right now. Just the card typically costs the same as multiple PCs. 

 

Also the "just reprogram it to do thing X" is a long-standing dream that hopefully will come true at some point, but it will take years/decades because making the whole framework for OSes and programs to swap blocks as needed and have it widely compatible is a pretty complex thing, and the kind of people it takes to develop complex FPGA designs to create those blocks aren't exactly cheap or abundant enough to make it viable at the comsumer level.

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Good answers already. To put another perspective on it, the more specific you make something, the better it is at that thing, but the worse it is at anything else.

 

Starting with a CPU, it is the most general compute resource we have. It can do pretty much anything, but not necessarily that quickly.

We go up to a GPU. This does fewer things, but those things it does much faster than a CPU. If it isn't one of those things, it might not do it at all, or so badly you just wouldn't use it for such.

Up again could be the FPGAs. You program them to perform a fixed function. It is good at that thing, and only that thing. If you make it more general, you're going back to a CPU. But because it isn't made to be a CPU, it is worse than a CPU at being a CPU. You can certainly re-program them to do something different, but it takes time and effort. Think of reprogramming a FPGA more like installing a different OS, not running a different program.

The most specialised would be an ASIC. It does one thing, and only that thing well.

 

 

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