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Is it safe to run NVMe SSD without heat sink?

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Like the title suggest.

 

My company is going to upgrade many of the laptop storage to M.2 SSD from old HDD. Dell laptops, not only they don't have any type of M.2 heat sink on their Latitude or Vostro laptops, but they don't even have a mounting point for the SSD if you don't configure it to use M.2 SSD right out from the factory. I can use a few sticky tape to hold the M.2 SSD in place, but I wonder if running an M.2 NVMe without heat sink would kill the SSD due to heat? Do you think M.2 SATA will be much better for this application? I'm living in tropical area and the air temperature can rise up above 38c.

 

Regards,

Chiyawa

I have ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder). More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism_spectrum

 

I apologies if my comments or post offends you in any way, or if my rage got a little too far. I'll try my best to make my post as non-offensive as much as possible.

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The drives should thermal throttle if there's any problem. Gen 3 drives don't really run that hot, especially if you go for a lower power one like the SK Hynix P31, and should be fine without a heatsink. 

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yeah found skhynix ssd in many low end laptops, i guess because it's not hot.

for piece of mind, you can just buy a  cheap flat heatsink, cost only $3-5, even less if you buy in bulk.

or you can put a thermal pads so it sticks to the back case spreading the heat.

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21 hours ago, RONOTHAN## said:

The drives should thermal throttle if there's any problem. Gen 3 drives don't really run that hot, especially if you go for a lower power one like the SK Hynix P31, and should be fine without a heatsink. 

I see. Okay, I'll keep an eye on this controller then.

 

20 hours ago, SupaKomputa said:

yeah found skhynix ssd in many low end laptops, i guess because it's not hot.

for piece of mind, you can just buy a  cheap flat heatsink, cost only $3-5, even less if you buy in bulk.

or you can put a thermal pads so it sticks to the back case spreading the heat.

Well, I don't think any of my local shop sell NVMe heat sink, but maybe I can use a copper plate and cut it to fit the SSD. Byt the way, which thermal pad is better. I think I saw either Cooler Master or Corsair, but they don't come cheap. I wonder if generic thermal pad works...

I have ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder). More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism_spectrum

 

I apologies if my comments or post offends you in any way, or if my rage got a little too far. I'll try my best to make my post as non-offensive as much as possible.

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2 minutes ago, Chiyawa said:

but maybe I can use a copper plate and cut it to fit the SSD.

Not likely a good idea, since it if shifts (not unlikely in a laptop) it can short out something on the laptop and break it. If you take a lot of precautions maybe, but this should be your absolute last resort. 

 

3 minutes ago, Chiyawa said:

Byt the way, which thermal pad is better. I think I saw either Cooler Master or Corsair, but they don't come cheap. I wonder if generic thermal pad works...

Only do the thermal pad method if you notice issues, odds are you won't and it would be completely unnecessary. 

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3 minutes ago, RONOTHAN## said:

Not likely a good idea, since it if shifts (not unlikely in a laptop) it can short out something on the laptop and break it. If you take a lot of precautions maybe, but this should be your absolute last resort. 

Yeah, metal is risky. Maybe need to add a hole to hold it down with the screw.

 

6 minutes ago, RONOTHAN## said:

Only do the thermal pad method if you notice issues, odds are you won't and it would be completely unnecessary. 

Still, the reason I'm concern with heat is because of one of my NVMe SSD burn out after 2 weeks of usage. Not sure if the SSD have issues in the beginning or not but the controller do report it hits 65c a few times and it's like jump from 37c to 65 c in mere 2 seconds. The SSD is Kingston NV1 1TB. Kingston A2000 is fine, though, but they no longer sell those. WD is difficult to get one at the moment. There is Samsung drive but I don't think we can afford those because it really is costly (about 1.6x the cost of NV1).

I have ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder). More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism_spectrum

 

I apologies if my comments or post offends you in any way, or if my rage got a little too far. I'll try my best to make my post as non-offensive as much as possible.

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Just now, Chiyawa said:

Yeah, metal is risky. Maybe need to add a hole to hold it down with the screw.

 

Still, the reason I'm concern with heat is because of one of my NVMe SSD burn out after 2 weeks of usage. Not sure if the SSD have issues in the beginning or not but the controller do report it hits 65c a few times and it's like jump from 37c to 65 c in mere 2 seconds. The SSD is Kingston NV1 1TB. Kingston A2000 is fine, though, but they no longer sell those. WD is difficult to get one at the moment. There is Samsung drive but I don't think we can afford those because it really is costly (about 1.6x the cost of NV1).

I think you just got unlucky, 65C is more than safe for a drive. There is something called the bathtub curve for hardware reliability, where in the first couple weeks of its life it's pretty likely to die, it drops off precipitously, then after a while the risk of failure starts to skyrocket. Sounds like you just got a drive that was destined to fail. 65C is about where the drives in my system get to when installing a steam game (albeit Gen 4 drives under the motherboard armor on a X570 Taichi, so that's why they run hotter), it's not particularly dangerous or anything. 

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