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Advice for RGBW LED Strip w/ Audio Reactiveness using MB Header or Controller?

I'm looking for some advice for my computer/battlestation setup. I would like to setup a LED Strips system that reacts to audio from my computer/aux jack. Nothing too special here so far.

Equipment:
-5050 RGBW 12v LED Strips around 15ft to 20ft
-MB Gigabyte z490 Vision D Page 29 for reactiveness 2x RGB Headers (Current MB)
-or RGBW 12v Controller with 3.5mm Jack w/ audio reactiveness, I don't believe this has a power adapter though. 12v 2A power adapter should work?
-30 Gauge wires for soldering the LED strips together for bends


MB RGB Header:
Is it possible to use this as an audio input for the whole RGBW LED setup? Are there RGB LED Controllers with an input feed? Of course, I could use this to power a shorter RGB LED strip, but that isn't as fun.
MB RGB header > connects to LED Controller > sends a signal to the rest of the RGB LED setup to sync with the audio of the computer

RGBW Controller w/ 3.5mm Jack:
If not this, this will work.

Thanks!

For another time, I'm also looking into Monitor Abilight setup and Arduino screen setup.

 

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, lowao said:

I'm looking for some advice for my computer/battlestation setup. I would like to setup a LED Strips system that reacts to audio from my computer/aux jack. Nothing too special here so far.

Equipment:
-5050 RGBW 12v LED Strips around 15ft to 20ft
-MB Gigabyte z490 Vision D Page 29 for reactiveness 2x RGB Headers (Current MB)
-or RGBW 12v Controller with 3.5mm Jack w/ audio reactiveness, I don't believe this has a power adapter though. 12v 2A power adapter should work?
-30 Gauge wires for soldering the LED strips together for bends


MB RGB Header:
Is it possible to use this as an audio input for the whole RGBW LED setup? Are there RGB LED Controllers with an input feed? Of course, I could use this to power a shorter RGB LED strip, but that isn't as fun.
MB RGB header > connects to LED Controller > sends a signal to the rest of the RGB LED setup to sync with the audio of the computer

RGBW Controller w/ 3.5mm Jack:
If not this, this will work.

Thanks!

For another time, I'm also looking into Monitor Abilight setup and Arduino screen setup.

 

well there are ones like this but it would be limited to its power as rgb work by voltage so to go longer you would need a repertory

there are some argb controllers like i no aquacomputer has that dont not about others

 

can program and Arduino to do anything

 

there might be some phone controllers as well

 

as for the mb software if it can do it or not i dont no depends of what there software offers. could you make a program to use the mb header to be controlled by the audio probably how i dont no. 

Edited by thrasher_565
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1 hour ago, lowao said:

I'm looking for some advice for my computer/battlestation setup. I would like to setup a LED Strips system that reacts to audio from my computer/aux jack. Nothing too special here so far.

Equipment:
-5050 RGBW 12v LED Strips around 15ft to 20ft
-MB Gigabyte z490 Vision D Page 29 for reactiveness 2x RGB Headers (Current MB)
-or RGBW 12v Controller with 3.5mm Jack w/ audio reactiveness, I don't believe this has a power adapter though. 12v 2A power adapter should work?
-30 Gauge wires for soldering the LED strips together for bends


MB RGB Header:
Is it possible to use this as an audio input for the whole RGBW LED setup? Are there RGB LED Controllers with an input feed? Of course, I could use this to power a shorter RGB LED strip, but that isn't as fun.
MB RGB header > connects to LED Controller > sends a signal to the rest of the RGB LED setup to sync with the audio of the computer

RGBW Controller w/ 3.5mm Jack:
If not this, this will work.

Thanks!

For another time, I'm also looking into Monitor Abilight setup and Arduino screen setup.

 

I don't think there's an input feed on motherboard rgb header.

And you need a repeater for a strip that long. 12v 5050 is around 5m long max. Unless you are okay with massive drop in brightness.
https://www.amazon.com/LEDENET-Amplifier-Signal-Repeater-Channels/dp/B00NOHZJZW
Something like that.

And a thicker cable. AWG 30 is like what? 0.8A max for chassis wiring?
Depending on the 5050 strips you are using, IIRC it can use around up to 19w per meter. (the 60 Leds per meter one)
19w / 12v = 1,5A per meter.
https://ledstuff.co.nz/catalog/product/view/id/569/s/strip-light-60-5050-leds-m-12v-rgbw1/
For 20ft (prob around 6 meters ?, idk, my country uses metric) = Thats a total of up to 114 watts, at 12v thats 9,5 amps. 80% rule, so get more than 9,5amps PSU. Don't forget to add the controller's power consumption.
You probably need another PSU for the repeater, go research, been a long time, I forgot.

 


Your motherboard RGB Header can only do up to 2A of 5050 12v (80% rule for safe practice, so around 1,6-1,8A).
Idk if this is for each header, or both combined. (Just a warning if you were planning to plug that long of a strip to the header)

Note : Unless you bought a premium stuff, I suggest getting a good double tape ready. Because those that comes with the led strip often fail after bit while.
Replacing the tapes is fairly simple when everything isn't set up yet, really not fun when it's already installed somewhere like ceiling or tiny crevices.

There is approximately 99% chance I edited my post

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15 hours ago, thrasher_565 said:

as for the mb software if it can do it or not i dont no depends of what there software offers. could you make a program to use the mb header to be controlled by the audio probably how i dont no. 

Excuse the lack of an explanation on my end. I was thinking of splitting the length of the RGBW strips in half using the two different inputs, but perhaps one is for 12v and the other is for 24v. I'm not sure what the exact length of RGBW strips will be required for my project. I wanted to be flexible within that range. The MB software can do reactive lightning, but I didn't mention this before. I'm using Linux and hopefully OpenRGB can access my hardware for this project. VMs are a hit or a miss sadly enough.

 

14 hours ago, Poinkachu said:

I don't think there's an input feed on motherboard rgb header.

And you need a repeater for a strip that long. 12v 5050 is around 5m long max. Unless you are okay with massive drop in brightness.
https://www.amazon.com/LEDENET-Amplifier-Signal-Repeater-Channels/dp/B00NOHZJZW
Something like that.

And a thicker cable. AWG 30 is like what? 0.8A max for chassis wiring?
Depending on the 5050 strips you are using, IIRC it can use around up to 19w per meter. (the 60 Leds per meter one)
19w / 12v = 1,5A per meter.
https://ledstuff.co.nz/catalog/product/view/id/569/s/strip-light-60-5050-leds-m-12v-rgbw1/
For 20ft (prob around 6 meters ?, idk, my country uses metric) = Thats a total of up to 114 watts, at 12v thats 9,5 amps. 80% rule, so get more than 9,5amps PSU. Don't forget to add the controller's power consumption.
You probably need another PSU for the repeater, go research, been a long time, I forgot.

 


Your motherboard RGB Header can only do up to 2A of 5050 12v (80% rule for safe practice, so around 1,6-1,8A).
Idk if this is for each header, or both combined. (Just a warning if you were planning to plug that long of a strip to the header)

Note : Unless you bought a premium stuff, I suggest getting a good double tape ready. Because those that comes with the led strip often fail after bit while.
Replacing the tapes is fairly simple when everything isn't set up yet, really not fun when it's already installed somewhere like ceiling or tiny crevices.

I explained that poorly on my end. I meant to say I was hoping that I could find an external controller with an input feed following the MB's instructions. So the MB would direct the external controller on how to manage the LED status.  Can I use both of these RGB connections on this controller? I'm not married to this one individual controller though. It looks like the lighting outside of the case will need a repeater then. 

Going off this website 30 AWG or even 18 AWG should be fine for the length of LED strips that I am looking for. Would I be correct in the assumption? That's a good point. I didn't put enough consideration into the wattage requirement for this. I need to reconsider my desk's lighting and how many feet it will be. Thank you for pointing this out.

Yep, you're correct. My plan was if I was going to use the MB RGB header to only use it for the inside strips which will be within their required length. Good call on that.

Regarding adhesive, would you recommend double sided tape over hot glue during installation process or is both suitable solutions? Sadly, my last build's internal LED strips' adhesive was a huge pain in my side. They kept drooping. 😕

The attached photo is the controller with two RGB connections? Are they both available for two different strips of LEDS or different voltage, 12v and 24v? Also, I just thought of something. They wouldn't be compatible with my RGBW, because there is no white line.

controller.jpg

                                     "Linux is only free if your time has no value." ~Jamie Zawinski

"Peaches" CPU 10900k // Heatsink Liquid Freezer II 280 // GPU EVGA 2080 Super XC // MB z490 Vision D // RAM Corsair Vengeance 80GB 3600 // PSU Corsair RMx 850 // OS 2x Intel 660p 2TB NVMe // Monitor Half 8k // VR Vive Index // Mouse Naga 2020 // Keyboard Ducky Shine 7 // Fedora 34 i3wm / Windows 10

"HTPC" CPU 3900x // Heatsink D15 // GPU GTX 980 // MB Tuf x570 Plus // RAM Corsair Vengeance 16GB 3600 // PSU Corsair RMx 850 // OS Kingston 460GB SSD // Monitor 4k // VR OG HTC Vive // Fedora 32 i3wm / Windows 10

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8 minutes ago, lowao said:

Excuse the lack of an explanation on my end. I was thinking of splitting the length of the RGBW strips in half using the two different inputs, but perhaps one is for 12v and the other is for 24v. I'm not sure what the exact length of RGBW strips will be required for my project. I wanted to be flexible within that range. The MB software can do reactive lightning, but I didn't mention this before. I'm using Linux and hopefully OpenRGB can access my hardware for this project. VMs are a hit or a miss sadly enough.

 

I explained that poorly on my end. I meant to say I was hoping that I could find an external controller with an input feed following the MB's instructions. So the MB would direct the external controller on how to manage the LED status.  Can I use both of these RGB connections on this controller? I'm not married to this one individual controller though. It looks like the lighting outside of the case will need a repeater then. 

Going off this website 30 AWG or even 18 AWG should be fine for the length of LED strips that I am looking for. Would I be correct in the assumption? That's a good point. I didn't put enough consideration into the wattage requirement for this. I need to reconsider my desk's lighting and how many feet it will be. Thank you for pointing this out.

Yep, you're correct. My plan was if I was going to use the MB RGB header to only use it for the inside strips which will be within their required length. Good call on that.

Regarding adhesive, would you recommend double sided tape over hot glue during installation process or is both suitable solutions? Sadly, my last build's internal LED strips' adhesive was a huge pain in my side. They kept drooping. 😕

The attached photo is the controller with two RGB connections? Are they both available for two different strips of LEDS or different voltage, 12v and 24v? Also, I just thought of something. They wouldn't be compatible with my RGBW, because there is no white line.

controller.jpg

imo i would go for argb strips instead. then you can just get the data and ground form the mb and use w/e ps for the power but i guess it dose cost more but if you have to add in the cost of repitors then i dont no. 

 

the w would have to be hooked to one of the other colors or get 2 controllers and split the audio... 🤔

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1 hour ago, lowao said:

 

Quote

I explained that poorly on my end. I meant to say I was hoping that I could find an external controller with an input feed following the MB's instructions. So the MB would direct the external controller on how to manage the LED status.  Can I use both of these RGB connections on this controller? I'm not married to this one individual controller though. It looks like the lighting outside of the case will need a repeater then. 

Technically that audio controller gonna get an input from your PC and do it's thing.

If you meant you want the MB to also control it when no music is playing for the whole strip setup.

I don't think it can, atleast not with the extent of my knowledge.
Maybe, MAYBE, will require Raspberry/Arduino as a mediator.
IIRC, non ARGB LED Strips switches color & brightness by playing with voltage afterall.
 

Quote

Going off this website 30 AWG or even 18 AWG should be fine for the length of LED strips that I am looking for. Would I be correct in the assumption? That's a good point. I didn't put enough consideration into the wattage requirement for this. I need to reconsider my desk's lighting and how many feet it will be. Thank you for pointing this out.

That's normal. My niece wanted to put strips all around the wall inside her room (around 30-40 meters of strips total).
Image her face when I told her how much PSU she will need. She thought it can be done with the 12v 2A adapter it came with.

30 AWG won't be adequate to handle even 3 ft. The only time I use it is probably when I need to do simple wire jumper in an arduino project. Which I generally try to avoid.
So, try not to use it. Especially if you stick it inside PC. Less things that has chance to easily burn inside PC is always a good thing.
 

Quote

Regarding adhesive, would you recommend double sided tape over hot glue during installation process or is both suitable solutions? Sadly, my last build's internal LED strips' adhesive was a huge pain in my side. They kept drooping. 😕

For strips, I chose to use double sided. Because the heat from the melted glue might ruin it (and also annoying when I need to take it off later).

Can't really withstand too much heat those strips.
I usually remove the original adhesive (which is pretty easy), then I grab my 3M VHB double tape, cut lots of small ones (like 2cm length), then i put one cut every 15cm or so.
If I need them to really stick close to the surface, I might use a thermal tape, or a combination of thermal tape & 3m tissue like double tape.
Because thermal tape is kinda pricey. But it can withstand heat and thinner than a VHB tape.

 

Quote

The attached photo is the controller with two RGB connections? Are they both available for two different strips of LEDS or different voltage, 12v and 24v? Also, I just thought of something. They wouldn't be compatible with my RGBW, because there is no white line.

Yeah that is for RGB. Based on my knowledge, you can either use a 24v 5050 or 12v 5050 on it. Not both at the same time.
If you use a 24v PSU on a 12v 5050, chance are the leds on the strip either gonna blow up immediately or burnt out after a bit while.
Even if the manufacturer says it's fine, I won't count on it.

 

Quote

Excuse the lack of an explanation on my end. I was thinking of splitting the length of the RGBW strips in half using the two different inputs, but perhaps one is for 12v and the other is for 24v. I'm not sure what the exact length of RGBW strips will be required for my project. I wanted to be flexible within that range. The MB software can do reactive lightning, but I didn't mention this before. I'm using Linux and hopefully OpenRGB can access my hardware for this project. VMs are a hit or a miss sadly enough.

If your strip is rated for 12v, use 12v.
Using lower than 12v means massive dimming.
Using higher than 12v means the components will have to work harder and/or hotter

However you want to split it. Just keep in mind that for 12v 5050 with 60 Leds per meter, each meter needs about 1,5Amps for max brightness.
Get the cable, and power source you need after calculating the whole set up power usage and adding like around 20%.
To truly know the detail you will need a multimeter, since pretty much every led strip is different (component quality, etc)


I usually DIY a fuse too if it's a long strip.
And if you need a big PSU, I'd rather get those with holes on it's enclosure. Because the component inside gonna be hot, and heat is one of the enemy of electronic lifespan.
 

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I might not be understanding what you are trying to do here but, Cant you use those 2 headers on page 29 for regular RGB 12V PC strips and a program like https://openrgb.org/ to control it? I use it and it works great set to Audio response, it just needs a pluging that adds a bunch of effects. 

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10 hours ago, Jorgemeister said:

I might not be understanding what you are trying to do here but, Cant you use those 2 headers on page 29 for regular RGB 12V PC strips and a program like https://openrgb.org/ to control it? I use it and it works great set to Audio response, it just needs a pluging that adds a bunch of effects. 

I believe he was asking if he can make the strips of his battlestations react to music, as well as taking a color input from the MB (maybe when there's no music playing).

OR, at the very least controlling the whole strip (battlestation's & PC) from the motherboard.

It might be a long strip past the MB header Amp limit.
And also most likely means routing a thick cable from inside the PC to outside and around. (aka, troublesome)

There is approximately 99% chance I edited my post

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6 hours ago, Poinkachu said:

I believe he was asking if he can make the strips of his battlestations react to music, as well as taking a color input from the MB (maybe when there's no music playing).

OR, at the very least controlling the whole strip (battlestation's & PC) from the motherboard.

It might be a long strip past the MB header Amp limit.
And also most likely means routing a thick cable from inside the PC to outside and around. (aka, troublesome)

OK so the led strip won't be inside his PC then, Seems like I missed that. OpenRGB could do most of that, but the "strip past the MB header Amp limit" seems to be a problem for sure.

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22 hours ago, Jorgemeister said:

OK so the led strip won't be inside his PC then, Seems like I missed that. OpenRGB could do most of that, but the "strip past the MB header Amp limit" seems to be a problem for sure.

there also ruining linux witch dont no if open rgb works or not

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45 minutes ago, thrasher_565 said:

there also ruining linux witch dont no if open rgb works or not

According to their website it does.

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On 5/24/2022 at 11:09 AM, Poinkachu said:

If you meant you want the MB to also control it when no music is playing for the whole strip setup.

I don't think it can, atleast not with the extent of my knowledge.
Maybe, MAYBE, will require Raspberry/Arduino as a mediator.
IIRC, non ARGB LED Strips switches color & brightness by playing with voltage afterall.

Excuse the late reply. Been busy over here. I want to tackle this project at a larger scale or at least, make sure I understand what is required to do so if I decide to go with the big setup. So, that is a bust. Having the motherboard instruct the whole LED system when to change the LED strips. However, the controller will be able to do that.

I guess, it would be possible to setup an ambilight system with the Arduino that would control the addressable LED strips within the computer, outside of the case, and the under the desk. But I have only seen instructions on how to manage the addressable LED strips with a simple layout like behind a monitor. It's probably possible to do a battlestation setup like I mentioned before: inside the computer, outside of the case, and under the desk with an arduino, but I will need to look into that more and try to understand the whole process at a deeper level.

 

Quote

That's normal. My niece wanted to put strips all around the wall inside her room (around 30-40 meters of strips total).
Image her face when I told her how much PSU she will need. She thought it can be done with the 12v 2A adapter it came with.

30 AWG won't be adequate to handle even 3 ft. The only time I use it is probably when I need to do simple wire jumper in an arduino project. Which I generally try to avoid.
So, try not to use it. Especially if you stick it inside PC. Less things that has chance to easily burn inside PC is always a good thing.

I was looking into power requirements for 16ft/5m and it would require 9amps with the buffer, but the LED strips that was linked previously do not state the power draw per foot. I think, I may have misunderstood you before. 30 gauge wire won't support wire lengths of more than 3ft at a time or in total? For most of the setup, it will only be connecting at the bends, but I would like there to be a wire running from inside the computer to outside of the case, and then to under the desk for those LED strips. This will require lengths of 3ft or longer. I used a calculator like this. I may not be understanding the the power draw of the LED strip in question though.

 

Quote

For strips, I chose to use double sided. Because the heat from the melted glue might ruin it (and also annoying when I need to take it off later).

Can't really withstand too much heat those strips.
I usually remove the original adhesive (which is pretty easy), then I grab my 3M VHB double tape, cut lots of small ones (like 2cm length), then i put one cut every 15cm or so.
If I need them to really stick close to the surface, I might use a thermal tape, or a combination of thermal tape & 3m tissue like double tape.
Because thermal tape is kinda pricey. But it can withstand heat and thinner than a VHB tape.

Done and done. Double sided tape it is. I had so many problems with the old strip staying up.
 

Quote

Yeah that is for RGB. Based on my knowledge, you can either use a 24v 5050 or 12v 5050 on it. Not both at the same time.
If you use a 24v PSU on a 12v 5050, chance are the leds on the strip either gonna blow up immediately or burnt out after a bit while.
Even if the manufacturer says it's fine, I won't count on it.

 

If your strip is rated for 12v, use 12v.
Using lower than 12v means massive dimming.
Using higher than 12v means the components will have to work harder and/or hotter

However you want to split it. Just keep in mind that for 12v 5050 with 60 Leds per meter, each meter needs about 1,5Amps for max brightness.
Get the cable, and power source you need after calculating the whole set up power usage and adding like around 20%.
To truly know the detail you will need a multimeter, since pretty much every led strip is different (component quality, etc)


I usually DIY a fuse too if it's a long strip.

The photo of the controller has two different inputs. I would only use 12v strips on that and hopefully go off in two different directions with 16ft each way if possible. I would never connect 12v and 24v strip to the same controller.

Silly question. How do I know a power supply will connect/fit inside of the controller? Different size barrel connectors or different shape tips could be a problem. I was looking at this power supply.

 

On 5/24/2022 at 10:33 AM, thrasher_565 said:

imo i would go for argb strips instead. then you can just get the data and ground form the mb and use w/e ps for the power but i guess it dose cost more but if you have to add in the cost of repitors then i dont no. 

 

the w would have to be hooked to one of the other colors or get 2 controllers and split the audio... 🤔

I do want to mess around with addressable RGB. I was thinking about using an Arduino for this project. Possibly connecting to the whole battlestation LED setup. That would be one hell of a project and a costly one at that. 

On 5/24/2022 at 6:54 PM, Jorgemeister said:

I might not be understanding what you are trying to do here but, Cant you use those 2 headers on page 29 for regular RGB 12V PC strips and a program like https://openrgb.org/ to control it? I use it and it works great set to Audio response, it just needs a pluging that adds a bunch of effects. 

That is exactly what I had in mind with this project for at least inside of the case using the MB RGB headers. I haven't tried the application yet, but it looks promising.

 

 

 

Battlestation LED Setup:
Here is the ultimate plan for battlestation LED setup. This isn't my drawing nor battlestation, but it might be easier to imagine with this photo in mind. I can go into more detail if needed. 


Equipment:
-5050 RGBW 12v LED Strips around 15ft to 20ft
-RGBW 12v Controller with 3.5mm Jack w/ audio reaction
-12v Power Supply
-30 Gauge wires for soldering the LED strips together for bends or thicker wires

-LED Strips within the computer
-LED strips on the left under the speaker connected to one of the controller's input within the computer

-LED strips on the right under the piano connected to the other controller's input within the computer

battlestation.jpg

                                     "Linux is only free if your time has no value." ~Jamie Zawinski

"Peaches" CPU 10900k // Heatsink Liquid Freezer II 280 // GPU EVGA 2080 Super XC // MB z490 Vision D // RAM Corsair Vengeance 80GB 3600 // PSU Corsair RMx 850 // OS 2x Intel 660p 2TB NVMe // Monitor Half 8k // VR Vive Index // Mouse Naga 2020 // Keyboard Ducky Shine 7 // Fedora 34 i3wm / Windows 10

"HTPC" CPU 3900x // Heatsink D15 // GPU GTX 980 // MB Tuf x570 Plus // RAM Corsair Vengeance 16GB 3600 // PSU Corsair RMx 850 // OS Kingston 460GB SSD // Monitor 4k // VR OG HTC Vive // Fedora 32 i3wm / Windows 10

"Dell p690 3U Blade, Totally Not a Shitty Desktop Server" CPU 2700k // Heatsink Stock // GPU EVGA GTX 970 // MB Yes // RAM Vengeance 16GB DDR3 // Monitor xrdp // VR Google Cardboard // OS Kingston 480GB // Not Porn 4TB Spinner // Fedora 31
"SalmonLeaves" RPi4 Model B 4GB DNS/NAS // RPi 2 Model B 1GB

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, lowao said:

Excuse the late reply. Been busy over here. I want to tackle this project at a larger scale or at least, make sure I understand what is required to do so if I decide to go with the big setup. So, that is a bust. Having the motherboard instruct the whole LED system when to change the LED strips. However, the controller will be able to do that.

I guess, it would be possible to setup an ambilight system with the Arduino that would control the addressable LED strips within the computer, outside of the case, and the under the desk. But I have only seen instructions on how to manage the addressable LED strips with a simple layout like behind a monitor. It's probably possible to do a battlestation setup like I mentioned before: inside the computer, outside of the case, and under the desk with an arduino, but I will need to look into that more and try to understand the whole process at a deeper level.

 

I was looking into power requirements for 16ft/5m and it would require 9amps with the buffer, but the LED strips that was linked previously do not state the power draw per foot. I think, I may have misunderstood you before. 30 gauge wire won't support wire lengths of more than 3ft at a time or in total? For most of the setup, it will only be connecting at the bends, but I would like there to be a wire running from inside the computer to outside of the case, and then to under the desk for those LED strips. This will require lengths of 3ft or longer. I used a calculator like this. I may not be understanding the the power draw of the LED strip in question though.

 

Done and done. Double sided tape it is. I had so many problems with the old strip staying up.
 

The photo of the controller has two different inputs. I would only use 12v strips on that and hopefully go off in two different directions with 16ft each way if possible. I would never connect 12v and 24v strip to the same controller.

Silly question. How do I know a power supply will connect/fit inside of the controller? Different size barrel connectors or different shape tips could be a problem. I was looking at this power supply.

 

I do want to mess around with addressable RGB. I was thinking about using an Arduino for this project. Possibly connecting to the whole battlestation LED setup. That would be one hell of a project and a costly one at that. 

That is exactly what I had in mind with this project for at least inside of the case using the MB RGB headers. I haven't tried the application yet, but it looks promising.

 

 

 

Battlestation LED Setup:
Here is the ultimate plan for battlestation LED setup. This isn't my drawing nor battlestation, but it might be easier to imagine with this photo in mind. I can go into more detail if needed. 


Equipment:
-5050 RGBW 12v LED Strips around 15ft to 20ft
-RGBW 12v Controller with 3.5mm Jack w/ audio reaction
-12v Power Supply
-30 Gauge wires for soldering the LED strips together for bends or thicker wires

-LED Strips within the computer
-LED strips on the left under the speaker connected to one of the controller's input within the computer

-LED strips on the right under the piano connected to the other controller's input within the computer

battlestation.jpg

well addressable rgb has the benefit of being able to be power w/e so when the leds start dimming just add more power. rgb you need a repertory as its controlled by voltage. meaning you can go as long as you want with argb. all you need is the data line and posably ground from the controller and the power can come from w/e psu, wall plug.

 

not saying you cant use rgb but seems like argb is better imo thow it cost more.

 

and arduino will be cheaper then buying a controller but you do have to program it but you could do w/e you want.

 

keep in mind alot of sofware have a hard cap for x amount of leds i guess that would make rgb better in that case.

 

 

inline-rgb-led-amplifier-oznium_circuit-diagram-for-led-light_wire-electric-supplies-electrical-wiring-cost-simple-switch-diagram-software-for-diagrams-logic-gates-receptacle-circu.png

Wiring-Diagram-of-rgb-amplifier.jpg

Wiring Diagram.png

 

 

Edited by thrasher_565
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8 hours ago, lowao said:

Excuse the late reply. Been busy over here. I want to tackle this project at a larger scale or at least, make sure I understand what is required to do so if I decide to go with the big setup. So, that is a bust. Having the motherboard instruct the whole LED system when to change the LED strips. However, the controller will be able to do that.

I guess, it would be possible to setup an ambilight system with the Arduino that would control the addressable LED strips within the computer, outside of the case, and the under the desk. But I have only seen instructions on how to manage the addressable LED strips with a simple layout like behind a monitor. It's probably possible to do a battlestation setup like I mentioned before: inside the computer, outside of the case, and under the desk with an arduino, but I will need to look into that more and try to understand the whole process at a deeper level.

1st let me say this, just in case you don't know.
So as to prevent disapointment later.


Mainly, there is 2 types of LED Strip used in PC building :
1. Standard RGB or RGBW Led strip (Which usually runs 12v)
2. ARGB Led strip

The 3 main differences is that :
- With ARGB strip, you can control the color for EACH led on it, whereas with non-ARGB when you change color, the whole strip will change.
- The pins, normal ARGB only uses 3 pins, whereas non-ARGB strip uses 4.
- Voltage, usually ARGB uses 5v, whereas non-ARGB usually use 12v.
- Control system, IIRC, non-ARGB control colors with playing with voltage and/or current (analog), whereas ARGB controls it using data (digital). Hence the pin amount difference.

 

This ambilight mentioned in the article/guide you linked is using ARGB strip. Which is why it is controlled using a micro-controller (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, etc), in order to control each LED's behavior.

For non-ARGB, most often the cheap controllers you can buy from amazon will suffice.


I connect mine with Arduino simply because I use sensors to make it so that it will only light up when I am in the vicinity of the PC, if I am too far for more than 30 minutes, it will turn off until I'm back.
(Yes, I am that lazy to flick a switch, and no I don't like the cheap often break fast remote that those controllers came with)
So keep in mind that if you don't want to connect sensors or make some sort of "DIY Smart" one, you don't really need arduino for your strips.

 

And I am obliged to remind you that connecting the inside of the PC to outside through a cable will make it a pain in the arse to clean the PC later. So, if it's me, I'd connect the inside and outside one with a detachable connector.

This method will also be useful so that when you are cleaning your PC, or troubleshooting it or whatever, especially in place far from your battlestation, you can simply connect to a power brick and mini controller, and have a flashlight that you don't have to hold.
Something like :
https://www.amazon.com/MASO-Monochromatic-Controller-Wireless-Dimmable/dp/B07TV47ZZN

https://www.amazon.com/BTF-LIGHTING-Remote-Controller-Strips-Brightness/dp/B08M62B2C8

 

Up to you if you want to go ARGB, but me, since you already have a 12v 5050 RGBW. Might as well use it first, at the very least for practice. With ARGB strips if you make a destructive mistake, it will be more costly.

 

Quote

I was looking into power requirements for 16ft/5m and it would require 9amps with the buffer, but the LED strips that was linked previously do not state the power draw per foot. I think, I may have misunderstood you before. 30 gauge wire won't support wire lengths of more than 3ft at a time or in total? For most of the setup, it will only be connecting at the bends, but I would like there to be a wire running from inside the computer to outside of the case, and then to under the desk for those LED strips. This will require lengths of 3ft or longer. I used a calculator like this. I may not be understanding the the power draw of the LED strip in question though.

I meant using 30 AWG cable to deliver power for more than 3ft length of LED Strip is rather iffy & can lead to unwanted accident.

Because no matter what length you use it, current still runs through it, and therefore the heat as a byproduct.


For just a short time it might be okay, but for prolonged use, I'd advise against it. Better to spend some money buying a thicker cable than to risk short-circuit or fire. If you made the whole setup well most likely you won't need much anyway.


My country don't use AWG system often, so I just refer to https://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

When building stuffs, build it with the intention to make it last forever, that's one of my adage.
The 2nd adage I have is : If the first above isn't feasible, at the very least aim to make it easier to troubleshoot later.

I don't even use 30awg for my arduino projects, I think I am using around 28awg or 26awg.


They made that calculator for and/or based on their own led strip product, in which technical specification they specify the Watt/ft.

This is a very rough calculation :

1 meter of 60Leds/M 12v 5050 typically uses 19 watt (IIRC), 1 meter is around 3,2ft.
So, 1ft is like a third or a meter, 19watts / 100 x 33 = 6,27watts, round it up a bit for safety (what I usually do).
For current : 19 watts / 12v = 1,58A, so for 1ft = around 0,5A

For each LED :
19 watts / 60 = 0.31w
1,58A / 60 = 0,026A

Quote

Done and done. Double sided tape it is. I had so many problems with the old strip staying up.

Yeah, the double tape that the strips came with from factory barely ever holds up well, especially so if you use long strips.

For the one inside the PC, I highly suggest using VHB tape or thermal tape. Drooping strips/falling straight to something like GPU is a bad bad thing.
You don't have to VHB / thermap tape the whole strip you plan to use in the PC (that'll be overkill), but atleast put generous amount, spreaded around, to help with adhesion.


Clean the surface using rubbing alcohol (to get rid of dust/oil layer), wipe dry with lint free cloth/paper towel, avoid touching the tape as much as you can (or wear latex/vynil glove), stick it to the surface, press for like 15-30seconds.

 

Quote

The photo of the controller has two different inputs. I would only use 12v strips on that and hopefully go off in two different directions with 16ft each way if possible. I would never connect 12v and 24v strip to the same controller.

Silly question. How do I know a power supply will connect/fit inside of the controller? Different size barrel connectors or different shape tips could be a problem. I was looking at this power supply.

Yeah it should give 2 outputs.
You can connect 24v strip along, but it will be seriously dimmed.
Just don't use 12v strip with a 24v power supply, unless there's some sort of voltage regulator inbetween.

 

If you plan to use those kind of power brick (one with a DC jack), you will need to DIY either a female DC barrel jack for the controller input, or cut the Male DC barrel jack on the power brick, split the plus and minus cable, and stick it into controller's input

 

===================

AS for the setup, I can't say much, since I am not into RGB much.
I can give one or two advice or reminder, but yeah, nothing life changing.


So here's the first advice about it (which I will give to my past self too if only it's possible to do so):

Buy a masking tape, when you have planned it out, use masking tape to stick the strips to where you want it to be, dont use the double tape yet.

Light it up, try it out for a few days, and if you are happy with it, take off the masking tape, and use the double tape.

 

Double work? I know. But it saves you from reapplying long double tapes (huge decrease in adhesion power after you take it off), and easier to modify if you have a change of heart about something.
And if you are using VHB tape, this method saves you from having to wrestle when you want to modify it, because those VHB tapes really sticks when they've setted in.
(Dunno if "setted" is even a word, sorry, english is not my main language xD)

 

1st reminder :
Don't put the controller inside the PC.
PC components is sensitive & expensive.

Less things that can turn into a "PC part murder suspect" inside the PC is always good.

There is approximately 99% chance I edited my post

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On 5/26/2022 at 10:51 PM, thrasher_565 said:

well addressable rgb has the benefit of being able to be power w/e so when the leds start dimming just add more power. rgb you need a repertory as its controlled by voltage. meaning you can go as long as you want with argb. all you need is the data line and posably ground from the controller and the power can come from w/e psu, wall plug.

 

not saying you cant use rgb but seems like argb is better imo thow it cost more.

 

and arduino will be cheaper then buying a controller but you do have to program it but you could do w/e you want.

 

keep in mind alot of sofware have a hard cap for x amount of leds i guess that would make rgb better in that case.

Do you know many LEDs is a hard cap for this kind of project? If I am programming this myself, there wouldn't be a limit right? Or is this a limitation of the Arduino? This is good food for thought. I like how this could be a longer project than just sticking RGB strips to metal. I have looked a few guides online. Do you recommend starting off with a certain one or suggested guide?

On 5/27/2022 at 1:35 AM, Poinkachu said:

1st let me say this, just in case you don't know.
So as to prevent disapointment later.


Mainly, there is 2 types of LED Strip used in PC building :
1. Standard RGB or RGBW Led strip (Which usually runs 12v)
2. ARGB Led strip

The 3 main differences is that :
- With ARGB strip, you can control the color for EACH led on it, whereas with non-ARGB when you change color, the whole strip will change.
- The pins, normal ARGB only uses 3 pins, whereas non-ARGB strip uses 4.
- Voltage, usually ARGB uses 5v, whereas non-ARGB usually use 12v.
- Control system, IIRC, non-ARGB control colors with playing with voltage and/or current (analog), whereas ARGB controls it using data (digital). Hence the pin amount difference.

 

This ambilight mentioned in the article/guide you linked is using ARGB strip. Which is why it is controlled using a micro-controller (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, etc), in order to control each LED's behavior.

For non-ARGB, most often the cheap controllers you can buy from amazon will suffice.


I connect mine with Arduino simply because I use sensors to make it so that it will only light up when I am in the vicinity of the PC, if I am too far for more than 30 minutes, it will turn off until I'm back.
(Yes, I am that lazy to flick a switch, and no I don't like the cheap often break fast remote that those controllers came with)
So keep in mind that if you don't want to connect sensors or make some sort of "DIY Smart" one, you don't really need arduino for your strips.

I am familiar with the basics of what was mentioned here, but there were few details that I missed. I am strongly considering ARGB with an Arduino now. I would like to program my ARGBs and adding a sensor sounds fun. Thank you for sharing this with me. I know you're saying this tongue in cheek, but automation will always beat manual entry/interfacing. 

I already plan on adding an Arduino to the mix, but I am having issues finding information on the project that I want to do. I want the Arduino to grab the current speed of the computer, the clock speed of the CPU and displaying on an LCD screen connected to the Arduino, but I have only found one person online that did this. He didn't include any information on the process though. I think, he was pulling HWinfo or something like that. Do you have any suggestions on this? I was thinking of just creating fake numbers the "computer speed" within the Arduino, but where is the fun in that? ha

Quote

And I am obliged to remind you that connecting the inside of the PC to outside through a cable will make it a pain in the arse to clean the PC later. So, if it's me, I'd connect the inside and outside one with a detachable connector.

This method will also be useful so that when you are cleaning your PC, or troubleshooting it or whatever, especially in place far from your battlestation, you can simply connect to a power brick and mini controller, and have a flashlight that you don't have to hold.
Something like :
https://www.amazon.com/MASO-Monochromatic-Controller-Wireless-Dimmable/dp/B07TV47ZZN

https://www.amazon.com/BTF-LIGHTING-Remote-Controller-Strips-Brightness/dp/B08M62B2C8

A connector like this would be a piece of cake to connect and disconnect though. This would solve the problem.

Quote

Up to you if you want to go ARGB, but me, since you already have a 12v 5050 RGBW. Might as well use it first, at the very least for practice. With ARGB strips if you make a destructive mistake, it will be more costly.

No LED strips were purchase yet. I'm making sure I understand most of it beforehand. Trying to at least.

Quote

I meant using 30 AWG cable to deliver power for more than 3ft length of LED Strip is rather iffy & can lead to unwanted accident.

Because no matter what length you use it, current still runs through it, and therefore the heat as a byproduct.


For just a short time it might be okay, but for prolonged use, I'd advise against it. Better to spend some money buying a thicker cable than to risk short-circuit or fire. If you made the whole setup well most likely you won't need much anyway.


My country don't use AWG system often, so I just refer to https://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

When building stuffs, build it with the intention to make it last forever, that's one of my adage.
The 2nd adage I have is : If the first above isn't feasible, at the very least aim to make it easier to troubleshoot later.

I don't even use 30awg for my arduino projects, I think I am using around 28awg or 26awg.


They made that calculator for and/or based on their own led strip product, in which technical specification they specify the Watt/ft.

This is a very rough calculation :

1 meter of 60Leds/M 12v 5050 typically uses 19 watt (IIRC), 1 meter is around 3,2ft.
So, 1ft is like a third or a meter, 19watts / 100 x 33 = 6,27watts, round it up a bit for safety (what I usually do).
For current : 19 watts / 12v = 1,58A, so for 1ft = around 0,5A

For each LED :
19 watts / 60 = 0.31w
1,58A / 60 = 0,026A

I was a bit confused before. Of course, I get the basic idea behind the gauges. Small number means thicker diameter. I think, I get it now. I misunderstood was I was reading online before. The lower the guage/AWG number the safer/under the recommended amperage limit for wiring the RGB strips. My apologizes for the confusion.

 

Quote

Yeah, the double tape that the strips came with from factory barely ever holds up well, especially so if you use long strips.

For the one inside the PC, I highly suggest using VHB tape or thermal tape. Drooping strips/falling straight to something like GPU is a bad bad thing.
You don't have to VHB / thermap tape the whole strip you plan to use in the PC (that'll be overkill), but atleast put generous amount, spreaded around, to help with adhesion.


Clean the surface using rubbing alcohol (to get rid of dust/oil layer), wipe dry with lint free cloth/paper towel, avoid touching the tape as much as you can (or wear latex/vynil glove), stick it to the surface, press for like 15-30seconds.

 

Yeah it should give 2 outputs.
You can connect 24v strip along, but it will be seriously dimmed.
Just don't use 12v strip with a 24v power supply, unless there's some sort of voltage regulator inbetween.

I have this heat tape from a previously project. Would this be an okay alternative to your recommendation? If not, I will buy VHB tape instead. I am not dealing with those drooping led strips again. ha!

 

Quote

If you plan to use those kind of power brick (one with a DC jack), you will need to DIY either a female DC barrel jack for the controller input, or cut the Male DC barrel jack on the power brick, split the plus and minus cable, and stick it into controller's input

 

===================

AS for the setup, I can't say much, since I am not into RGB much.
I can give one or two advice or reminder, but yeah, nothing life changing.


So here's the first advice about it (which I will give to my past self too if only it's possible to do so):

Buy a masking tape, when you have planned it out, use masking tape to stick the strips to where you want it to be, dont use the double tape yet.

Light it up, try it out for a few days, and if you are happy with it, take off the masking tape, and use the double tape.

 

Double work? I know. But it saves you from reapplying long double tapes (huge decrease in adhesion power after you take it off), and easier to modify if you have a change of heart about something.
And if you are using VHB tape, this method saves you from having to wrestle when you want to modify it, because those VHB tapes really sticks when they've setted in.
(Dunno if "setted" is even a word, sorry, english is not my main language xD)

 

1st reminder :
Don't put the controller inside the PC.
PC components is sensitive & expensive.

Less things that can turn into a "PC part murder suspect" inside the PC is always good.

Thank you for the heads up regarding the power supply tip. This is why I asked. 

My last build I had LED strips around transparent fans. It was a pain in the butt trying to maintain them after the fact. I won't be doing that again. It did look cool though. Which country are you located? No pressure to actually answer that, but I am a bit curious. Your English is great. Never had any issues reading it. Settled in is a great way to put it! I'm going to research Arduino ARGB a bit more now. I'm leaning more towards that for my lighting needs. 

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