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TPM VS PTT vs Other Alternatives?

Thedreadlord
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I managed to install Windows 11 on Intel's i3 6006u processor even thought it's not officially supported by Windows 11. It features Ptt instead of Tpm. Which i think is the Intel's version of Tpm. It was extremely slow even thought it was on ddr4 8gigs ram. Windows 10 is running very smoothly.

 

Is the TPM 2.0 version recommend by Microsoft any better? 

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4 minutes ago, Thedreadlord said:

I managed to install Windows 11 on Intel's i3 6006u processor even thought it's not officially supported by Windows. It has Ptt instead of Tpm. Which i think is the Intel's version of Tpm. It was extremely slow even thought it was on ddr4 8gigs ram. Windows 10 is running very smoothly.

 

Is the TPM 2.0 version recommend by Microsoft any better? 

PTT is not the same thing.  A motherboard with PTT likely supports a TPM add-on module, but PTT itself is not TPM.

So its unlikely to be the issue as it can't use TPM without TPM support either built-in or with an add-on module, which is pointless adding IMO if you're using unsupported hardware to begin with as its not guaranteed to work once they start actually implementing things that use TPM as standard.

Router:  Quotom-Q555G6-S05 running pfSense WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (1.44Gbit peak at 160Mhz 2x2 MIMO, ~900Mbit at 80Mhz)

Switches: Netgear MS510TXUP, Netgear MS510TXPP, Netgear GS110EMX
ISPs: Zen VDSL (~74Mbit) + VOXI 4G [Vodafone] (~120Mbit) + Three 5G (~500Mbit average)

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3 minutes ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

PTT is not the same thing.  A motherboard with PTT likely supports a TPM add-on module, but PTT itself is not TPM.

Is it the same for Laptops too? We are talking about Dell Inspiron 3567. Which must have had other built in features such as sgx. I think its business oriented laptop?

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6 minutes ago, Thedreadlord said:

Is it the same for Laptops too? We are talking about Dell Inspiron 3567. Which must have had other built in features such as sgx. I think its business oriented laptop?

Laptops are more likely to have TPM but I think it should specifically mention it in the BIOS, though being Dell you never know they might have hidden those options.


I think the Windows 11 compatibility checker should have said if it has TPM even if it has an unsupported CPU?

Router:  Quotom-Q555G6-S05 running pfSense WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (1.44Gbit peak at 160Mhz 2x2 MIMO, ~900Mbit at 80Mhz)

Switches: Netgear MS510TXUP, Netgear MS510TXPP, Netgear GS110EMX
ISPs: Zen VDSL (~74Mbit) + VOXI 4G [Vodafone] (~120Mbit) + Three 5G (~500Mbit average)

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1 minute ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

Laptops are more likely to have TPM but I think it should specifically mention it in the BIOS, though being Dell you never know they might have hidden those options.

I think the Windows 11 compatibility checker should have said if it has TPM even if it has an unsupported CPU?

To my understanding you could see 4 types of keys. Including secure boot. However when you were in the Windows. No where did Microsoft said Ptt. It always said tpm module. 

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2 minutes ago, Thedreadlord said:

To my understanding you could see 4 types of keys. Including secure boot. However when you were in the Windows. No where did Microsoft said Ptt. It always said tpm module. 

I think this might work to see if TPM is supported:
Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut, type the tpm.msc command, and click the OK button.

 

But honestly I think the point is moot when using unsupported CPUs as there could be other CPU specific reasons why they do not plan to support those CPUs.

Router:  Quotom-Q555G6-S05 running pfSense WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (1.44Gbit peak at 160Mhz 2x2 MIMO, ~900Mbit at 80Mhz)

Switches: Netgear MS510TXUP, Netgear MS510TXPP, Netgear GS110EMX
ISPs: Zen VDSL (~74Mbit) + VOXI 4G [Vodafone] (~120Mbit) + Three 5G (~500Mbit average)

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3 minutes ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

I think this might work to see if TPM is supported:
Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut, type the tpm.msc command, and click the OK button.

 

But honestly I think the point is moot when using unsupported CPUs as there could be other CPU specific reasons why they do not plan to support those CPUs.

I have had long experience just downloading something and someone remotely accessing my computer from nowhere. It must have vulnerability or something. I can't check that right now. What about other tpm alternatives?

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A legit and trusted VPN maybe is the one for you to have and use? Because in my opinion PTT(cpu based) and TPM(module based) works greatly for secure boot and system firmware purposes only. My 2 cents...

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3 minutes ago, RMTM said:

A legit and trusted VPN maybe is the one for you to have and use? Because in my opinion PTT(cpu based) and TPM(module based) works greatly for secure boot and system firmware purposes only. My 2 cents...

I'm currently selling everything and will wait 1 or 2 years until the market calms down a bit. Everything is way too expensive and is going to be replaced within 2 months. If tpm. 1.2 was sufficient. They wouldn't have released tpm 2.0. i think

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Windows 11 will install on unsupported CPUs, as long as the system has: TPM chip or a variation of it (fTPM, PTT, Pluton) and SecureBoot.

(and technically: 4GB of RAM or more and 64GB of storage or more)

 

That said, Microsoft says that if your CPU is not supported, you are on your own. You have BSODs, performance issues, things don't work right... too bad, is what they are saying. They won't help you nor look into it. If in the future they decide to use a technology that your CPU isn't supported and makes you unable to get the update, then you agree that you understand that you'll be left out. Microsoft will only tests it's OS with the list of supported CPUs.

 

They are a few reasons for this, such as some security features used by Windows 11, can have a performance impact due to lack or not as good hardware acceleration to reduce the performance impact of those features being utilized. Also, Specter and Meltdown security issues. In addition, you also have/should have support by the manufactures. 

 

Now, that said, currently, Windows 11 is still very close to Windows 10, so it unlikely to have issues. Of course, I can't predict the future. But looks like, at least for this year, you should be fine. That said, many had to do a BIOS/UEFI update to have everything working great, which is a problem for unsupported systems. In the DIY space, some motherboards aren't getting BIOS/UEFI updates, despite having a supported CPUs, and faces performance issues due to an issue when fTPM/PTT is enabled. Some motherboard manufactures just has poor/horrible after sale support. They either don't care, or priories support for their premium boards, and budget ones will be last to update, assuming they are any plans for them. But this is nothing new.

 

Anyways,

 

Intel PTT is a firmware version of the TPM chip which runs in the CPU. It's not exactly 1-to-1 firmware equivalent. But its role and the way it can be interacted with is the same as TPM. A s a result, Windows 11 is happy. For it, it has a TPM chip.

 

fTPM is AMD TPM firmware implementation equivalent,. It is closer to the TPM chip than Intel PTT. Windows 11 is happy by it.

 

And as for Pluton, it is Microsoft TPM chip equivalent that is embedded in the CPU. Pluton can be seen as not only a dedicated TPM chip that can be embedded in the CPU, but can also be updated by the OS installed on the system. So the user is not depended on the computer manufacture or motherboard manufacture for updates.

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