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AIO questions

floe
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Go to solution Solved by GhostRoadieBL,

1 - the pump is still below the radiator in that config so air will be caught in the radiator instead of in the pump. If you were to mount it to the bottom, the pump still isn't the highest point in the system since the block would be above the pump. It's a clever design which basically prevents the issues most AIO's have with pump/block combos in that orientation. (it would still be back to have air trapped in the block for cooling but the pump would still be fine)

 

2 - any fan with decent static pressure (basically all radiator fans) will work well on any other radiator in the AIO space. When you start to get into custom loops and change fin density you can get better performance from a high airflow fan and low fin density, or a high pressure fan and high fin density. Most AIOs are in the high fin density group and should have high pressure fans.

2 questions

1 - I saw this video: 

on mounting orientation. One thing said, was that the pump should be at the bottom of the loop. I was looking at the Be Quiet Pure loop 240 to put at the top of my case. But This cooler has a pump near the radiator would this also be bad?

2- I could just go safe with an Arctic freezer II 240. I have be Quiet light wings (high speed version) that I would like to put on my radiator, would this be fine for this cooler?  and does it even matter or does a fan that's decent on a radiator do just as well regardless of which cooler they're on?

all help is appreciated 🙂

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1 - the pump is still below the radiator in that config so air will be caught in the radiator instead of in the pump. If you were to mount it to the bottom, the pump still isn't the highest point in the system since the block would be above the pump. It's a clever design which basically prevents the issues most AIO's have with pump/block combos in that orientation. (it would still be back to have air trapped in the block for cooling but the pump would still be fine)

 

2 - any fan with decent static pressure (basically all radiator fans) will work well on any other radiator in the AIO space. When you start to get into custom loops and change fin density you can get better performance from a high airflow fan and low fin density, or a high pressure fan and high fin density. Most AIOs are in the high fin density group and should have high pressure fans.

Current Config:

Spoiler

R5 2600X @4.1ghz all core, 16GB Patriot 3200mhz, 1TB XPG SX8200 Pro nvme, RTX 2070 Duke, CM Elite 110 mitx, pair of KRK Rokit 6 monitors with 10in sub, BenQ TH671ST projector for 150" screen. 

MSI Prestige 14 with too many cooling mods to list out (it's quiet now)

 

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9 minutes ago, GhostRoadieBL said:

1 - the pump is still below the radiator in that config so air will be caught in the radiator instead of in the pump. If you were to mount it to the bottom, the pump still isn't the highest point in the system since the block would be above the pump. It's a clever design which basically prevents the issues most AIO's have with pump/block combos in that orientation. (it would still be back to have air trapped in the block for cooling but the pump would still be fine)

 

2 - any fan with decent static pressure (basically all radiator fans) will work well on any other radiator in the AIO space. When you start to get into custom loops and change fin density you can get better performance from a high airflow fan and low fin density, or a high pressure fan and high fin density. Most AIOs are in the high fin density group and should have high pressure fans.

Oh i guess all of my options are fine then, thanks for the help!

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