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Unique video streaming requirements, is there a solution?

Hi, I'm doing many many many hours of recording video lecture (to my computer, not streaming/online), and the problem is not the recording, but the insane amount of time it takes to identify & cut out all the re-takes,

 

Compared to when I'm recording just audio, I will usually have an audio program record what I'm saying, and every time I slip up, I simply pause + Ctrl+Z, and that segment I just recorded will be gone, and thus I never have to then listen through 10 hours of audio to figure out which ones were a bad take,

 

so I was wondering if I could do something similar with video, ie: "Stream" my Sony A7C camera directly into a video-editor, and everytime I do a bad take just Undo/Delete and try again. But apparently you can't stream into video-editors like Davinci Resolve. I would have to use something like OBS to stream into, and I would have to stop a bad recording, then find the file and delete it, there's no quick keyboard button to just "delete take"

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It sounds like you can just use your camera as a webcam through OBS (a lot of cameras have software that makes this possible). That way you can just stop recording and delete the file, then record the next clip.

 

Some cameras also have a software where you can control the camera from your computer, so you might not even need OBS.

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You could just make a specific sound that would tell if if the take is bad or not.

For example, people clap or use one of those  clappers to start a scene, because that noise is very easy to see on the timeline, it shows up as an audio spike.

 

So you could make a rule for yourself like for example every time time you start something, clap twice. If you screw something up, clap three times. if you're happy with it, clap twice again.

When you're done recording, simply go through the audio and look for two spikes and after those two spikes that's your starting point. If there's two spikes further, that's your end point, select range copy, paste to other video ... OR  find two spikes, if they're followed by 3 spikes select range, hit delete to cut from video .

 

Using OBS would be another option. 

You can configure OBS to start and stop recording using a hotkey and it can name files using the time or some other parameters you set.  There may even be a hotkey to delete the latest... or you could set up a script using Auto Hotkey or something that when you press a key combination, it will look in that folder where OBS dumps the videos and delete the most recent video (based on modification date or the file name) ... could also have a short cut to move any segment you're happy with in some other folder.

So you could just record segments and delete the ones you're not happy with.

At the end, you an just join the remaining clips in a video editor and export the result.

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10 hours ago, Real_NC said:

It sounds like you can just use your camera as a webcam through OBS (a lot of cameras have software that makes this possible). That way you can just stop recording and delete the file, then record the next clip.

 

Some cameras also have a software where you can control the camera from your computer, so you might not even need OBS.

It would be nice to not have to buy a HDMI capture card, but unfortunately I tried Sonys streaming (for my A7C) and it was 60fps only (I need 24fps) as far as I could tell. It was also only 1080p & low bitrate.

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10 hours ago, mariushm said:

You could just make a specific sound that would tell if if the take is bad or not.

For example, people clap or use one of those  clappers to start a scene, because that noise is very easy to see on the timeline, it shows up as an audio spike.

 

So you could make a rule for yourself like for example every time time you start something, clap twice. If you screw something up, clap three times. if you're happy with it, clap twice again.

When you're done recording, simply go through the audio and look for two spikes and after those two spikes that's your starting point. If there's two spikes further, that's your end point, select range copy, paste to other video ... OR  find two spikes, if they're followed by 3 spikes select range, hit delete to cut from video .

 

Using OBS would be another option. 

You can configure OBS to start and stop recording using a hotkey and it can name files using the time or some other parameters you set.  There may even be a hotkey to delete the latest... or you could set up a script using Auto Hotkey or something that when you press a key combination, it will look in that folder where OBS dumps the videos and delete the most recent video (based on modification date or the file name) ... could also have a short cut to move any segment you're happy with in some other folder.

So you could just record segments and delete the ones you're not happy with.

At the end, you an just join the remaining clips in a video editor and export the result.

Developing some clapping system would have the benefit that I could use it even when I'm recording stuff away from the computer, but unfortunately I think it's just too annoying to scan for those peaks all the time, ideally I'd like to take like 10 takes for each paragraph.

 

Yeah the AHK might be the only solution, but it's not an easy script to make (as it would have to have so many error-checks, so that you don't accidentally trigger it 10 times in a row deleting 10 clips for example. and maybe OBS doesn't save it instantly, so there's the risk  that I trigger the script right before it's saved and therefore only removing the previous take I liked)

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