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Cpu too high voltage (solved)

Go to solution Solved by ouroesa,
5 minutes ago, emosun said:

 

So would it be fair to say that there's no common modern processor that would handle lets say 5 volts and be a comically high amount of voltage to expect them to run at?

Yes, 5V is comically high for modern CPU's.

The CPU power does come form the 12V+ rail and is then stepped down to a suitable voltage. ATX power supplies generally supply 12v+, 5v+ and 3.3V. The CPU can consume (assuming ~200watt TDP) 130A  @ 1.5 V so there is still a hell of a lot of power going through it. 

Whats is a voltage that would be possible to send through a cpu that would be far too high and guarantee it would fail during and overclock. Obviously 1000 volts would be too high but I mean a voltage that someone could conceivably set in an overclocking scenario without knowing what the voltage setting does at all. Basically need a voltage that is possible but comically too high

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I could imagine someone fat fingering and hitting a 7 on the numpad instead of a 4, resulting in 1.7V, which would be bad, although it might not be an instant kill depending on the CPU.

 

For someone totally naïve, I could imagine them trying to set 12V, because they heard that the CPU EPS cable from the power supply carries 12V, and thus thinks that that's a good idea, but I don't think most motherboards allow a voltage that high.

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Extremely open ended question there - first off, depends on the CPU.
Some Old CPUs used to run on 5v. Newer CPUs generally want to be below 2V or so but it depends on the amount of current running through them. Rule of thumb for newer CPUs are - below 1.35V for 24/7; below 1.45 with good cooling for overclocks, pushing real hard (would not recommend (I run my overclocks around 1.3V for the most part, law of diminishing returns sets in here)and exotic cooling (NO2) around 1.6V. Think 2V+ should kill most CPU's or at least trip protection (which is more likely).

 

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that totally depends on the CPU, the board is just as likely to burn out a power delivery component as the CPU is to fail. Old Pentiums ran at 3.5v, if you were to push that through modern CPUs the transistors would not be able to handle it.

 

I think most motherboards won't push more than a few volts unless they are designed for overclocking (this may not be right anymore but I remember modding boards for LN2 overclocking to step up voltage past the BIOS limits)

 

The big killer is heat as a byproduct of voltage so you can throw 10v into a CPU and the traces may burn off or 1.5v into the same processor with a bad cooler and the same will happen IF the thermal throttling and safeties are all bypassed

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For Ryzen? ~1.85v? Older Intel? 2v.. but probably less. I have a dead 3770K that came with an insulated Z77 OC Formula. Not sure how far it went, but she is dead. Probably under 2v. I know in the AXP days 2v was just getting started. I know I have been over 2.3v. But not on anything modern.. 10 year old Intel's I have no qualms about feeding 1.6v provided its either winter, or I can cool it 😄

 

My 3770K has been to 1.575v, and my x5690 has been to 1.6v. My 5900X has been to 1.55v manually.. gets pretty warm so don't do it 🙂

 

CPU's are actually pretty tough.. until they aren't. I haven't killed one personally. Killed lots of boards, and some ram, and a couple of PSU's too I suppose.

 

I think someone should try 🙂

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10 minutes ago, freeagent said:
12 minutes ago, GhostRoadieBL said:

 

20 minutes ago, YoungBlade said:

 

15 minutes ago, ouroesa said:

 

 

So would it be fair to say that there's no common modern processor that would handle lets say 5 volts and be a comically high amount of voltage to expect them to run at?

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5 minutes ago, emosun said:

 

So would it be fair to say that there's no common modern processor that would handle lets say 5 volts and be a comically high amount of voltage to expect them to run at?

Yes, 5V is comically high for modern CPU's.

The CPU power does come form the 12V+ rail and is then stepped down to a suitable voltage. ATX power supplies generally supply 12v+, 5v+ and 3.3V. The CPU can consume (assuming ~200watt TDP) 130A  @ 1.5 V so there is still a hell of a lot of power going through it. 

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3 minutes ago, emosun said:

So would it be fair to say that there's no common modern processor that would handle lets say 5 volts and be a comically high amount of voltage to expect them to run at?

I would say its a pretty fair assumption.. I would be impressed with 2.5v let alone 5.. You know how hot these can get with 1.55v, pretty much any CPU made in the last 5 years would be pretty  cranky with that. I cannot control the heat from my 5900X at 1.45v set and get, its just too much. 7nm is a bear. Pretty sure 1.6v would kill it if the board would allow that kind of amperage. Linpack would be my tool of choice for the slaughter.

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36 minutes ago, emosun said:

So would it be fair to say that there's no common modern processor that would handle lets say 5 volts and be a comically high amount of voltage to expect them to run at?

Generally all desktop processors can handle up to 1.45V with minimum degradation.

At 1.5V it will start degrading fast.

At 1.6V-1.7V you will see extreme degradation with high risk of premature death,usually used for extreme overclocking.

Above 1.7V you have a very high chance of quick death.

Some chips can survive 1.8V without instantly dying,and some don't.

For example some Core 2 Quad Q6600 can survive 1.8V,in general they have higher tolerance.

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If you froze it and ran at ~2v or so it would probably be okish.. maybe.. I could just be talking shit because it does seem like a lot for a modern cpu😛

 

Edit:

 

I looked at one hwbot entry for a 5900X frozen and it looked to be around 1.75v.. so on air I bet it would die or be damaged..

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9 minutes ago, freeagent said:

If you froze it and ran at ~2v or so it would probably be okish.. maybe.. I could just be talking shit because it does seem like a lot for a modern cpu😛

I have never seen a modern CPU that can survive 2V.

There is a reason why extreme overclockers usually don't go above 1.7V...

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15 minutes ago, Vishera said:

There is a reason why extreme overclockers usually don't go above 1.7V...

I see that now, I had no idea what limits were for frozen CPU’s these days, I just looked 🙂

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4 hours ago, emosun said:

 

So would it be fair to say that there's no common modern processor that would handle lets say 5 volts and be a comically high amount of voltage to expect them to run at?

5V is above the ratings for a lot of the newer microcontrollers. Hell, I wouldn't be surprised if the transistors in a modern Intel CPU have a breakdown voltage lower than 5V. In any case, they're really tiny, really fast transistors. They're delicate little flowers. 

 

Really old processors like the Motorola 68000, Zilog Z80, MOS 6502, etc. are 5V compatible. Not used in desktop computers anymore, but you might be surprised by how common some of these old chips still are.

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5 hours ago, emosun said:

Whats is a voltage that would be possible to send through a cpu that would be far too high and guarantee it would fail during and overclock. Obviously 1000 volts would be too high but I mean a voltage that someone could conceivably set in an overclocking scenario without knowing what the voltage setting does at all. Basically need a voltage that is possible but comically too high

It would be nearly impossible to accidentally set a v-core that was unsafe for your cpu and actually F10 your chip to death.

 

Because motherboards, as far back as I can recall will either not have selections that high (OEM type) or the aftermarket overclocking board will alert the user of the change. 

If you're familiar with Gigabyte, they really make sure you know the setting is too high. I'm sure there are some boards that don't have a warning, there's always that one....

 

But I would say safe oopsie would be like 1.5v or less. I know first hand that 1.6v will degrade Ryzen chip real fast. So I hope people see that warning that the v-core is set too high!

 

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4 hours ago, freeagent said:

I see that now, I had no idea what limits were for frozen CPU’s these days, I just looked 🙂

There is no fucking limit man. Half the submissions the c-states where enabled. Helps with cold post I think. Though I've always shut it off. 12900K 1.4v Der8auer. Ya, I don't think so. Even with core reduction. 7120.8mhz http://valid.x86.fr/ttb4eu

 

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