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Optical Cable Repair ( Connecting to raw cable )

Exaco
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Hi there,

I'm curious how hard is to replace/repair Optical Cable as mine got bent and Internet stopped working and what kind of equipment is needed.

The main internet cable coming from outside is just optical cable without any kind of connections and connects to the other short optical cable that goes to Modem. From the "main" cable there goes tiny blue wire into some sort of small plastic/glass tube where it connects to the other optical cable. Doesn't look too complicated, possibly I could simply get some adapter or something like that which has the correct optical port and it's not too hard to put the pure cable inside.

Otherwise I will just get professional repair from the ISP which will possibly cost a lot more.

Any suggestions ? Basically I somehow need to attach the "naked" optical cable into this port.

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From what I understand, in order to terminate a fiber connection like that, it requires very specialized tooling. That tooling costs about $5000 US for the stuff that doesn't suck. 

 

So no, a profession repair will not cost more, it will likely be way cheaper. It will still be expensive, but way less than the cost of the tooling that you'd use once and have to try and flip on eBay. 

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6 minutes ago, RONOTHAN## said:

From what I understand, in order to terminate a fiber connection like that, it requires very specialized tooling. That tooling costs about $5000 US for the stuff that doesn't suck. 

 

So no, a profession repair will not cost more, it will likely be way cheaper. It will still be expensive, but way less than the cost of the tooling that you'd use once and have to try and flip on eBay. 

Just found a tutorial and something like this + the port would be enough imo.
But that's also total around $50 total with no guarantee it would work so probs still more expensive than pro repair.

Ehh.. thought it's a bit simpler 😄
 

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You'll have to get the ISP to come and change your cable.  They are unlikely to repair it, but a cable like that is maybe 5-10$ in whatever your local currency, and the service call should be free as you pay for a service you're no longer getting.

 

The fibers have to be stripped of insulation (the actual fiber is very thin), cut the ends correctly, then a tool is used to align the fibers and splice them (melts the fibers together )  to make a connection

The video below is a good example :

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Exaco said:

Just found a tutorial and something like this + the port would be enough imo.
But that's also total around $50 total with no guarantee it would work so probs still more expensive than pro repair.

Ehh.. thought it's a bit simpler 😄
 

It will depend on the cable. There are different specifications and you will require the right tool for the job. 

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1 hour ago, RONOTHAN## said:

From what I understand, in order to terminate a fiber connection like that, it requires very specialized tooling. That tooling costs about $5000 US for the stuff that doesn't suck. 

 

So no, a profession repair will not cost more, it will likely be way cheaper. It will still be expensive, but way less than the cost of the tooling that you'd use once and have to try and flip on eBay. 

Its REALLY not recommended, as a bad fibre can take down everyone on the same fibre.  It may already be causing your neighbours problems with your ISP chasing their tails as they will have no idea where the problem is.

Not to mention the lasers used in these fibers can blind you if you accidentally shine it in your eyes while working on it.  You absolutely DO NOT mess with fiber unless you know what you're doing.

Router:  Quotom-Q555G6-S05 running pfSense WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (~940Mbit peak)

Switches: Netgear MS510TXUP, Netgear MS510TXPP, Netgear GS110EMX
ISPs: Zen VDSL (~74Mbit) + VOXI 4G [Vodafone] (~120Mbit) + Three 5G (~500Mbit average)

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