Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

How 'standard' is 1Gb networking?

Nic_s
 Share

Right at the start of the video: "You probably haven't had to think to much about what gadget to plug into what port on your home router or network switch... 'Cos they're usually all the same speed. Gigabit on just about everything has been the standard for quite a while now."

 

Has it? Is it?

 

 

 

In November 2021 I made the mistake of assuming that 1Gb is basically standard and bought the ASUS AC51 as it was on a huge special. However, I did not get to setting it up until after the holidays as I was waiting on a new switch as well. When I finally got it setup I saw the WAN and LAN ports are only 100Mbps. By now I cannot return the router. Now this is my mistake for not scrolling all the way down and expanding the product description on our version of Amazon here in South Africa, Takealot.

 

Seeing this video got me wondering how many general consumer products is still using 100Mbps... and it seems like quite a bit. I looked on Takealot and then looked up the specs on the manufacture sites and kinda gave up after about 20min... see list at the end of the post.

 

I'm struggling to understand why 100Mbps is still pretty much everywhere. The manufactures can't mention the incredible wifi speeds enough, but what's the point if it's just going to get choked down to 100Mbps anyway?? Internet speeds are also going up all the time which means 100Mbps is often limiting your internet speeds. I have 200Mbps and so the 100Mbps on this ASUS router makes it kinda useless.

 

Sure, 100Mbps is still useful as it uses less power and produces less heat and for IoT or mobile devices it should be perfectly fine. Considering modern internet speeds, modern Wifi Speeds, and how cheap gigabit is, I think most of these 100Mbps consumer wifi routers are basically e-waste. Gigabit routers will be perfectly fine for most consumers for quite some time still, but 100Mbps stopped being fine for general networking many years ago.

 

According to wikipedia... 100Mbps was introduced in 1995 which makes it more than 25 years old. Gigabit was introduced in 1998.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_Ethernet

 

Obviously, the tech savvy people would not be buying 100Mbps devices unless it's a requirement for some reason, but most of the public actually doesn't know any better and will continue to buy these products. I think manufacturers know this and is taking advantage of most people not knowing any better and selling them great wifi that is choked down to 100Mbps.

 

 

So, no... you do actually have to think about the network speeds of your devices. Don't make the same mistake I did and make sure what the specs are. If you can't find the specs to confirm the speeds, don't buy it.

 

 

TP-Link: Note how the colors of the ports are the same as the Gigabit versions...
https://www.tp-link.com/za/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c60/#specifications
https://www.tp-link.com/za/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c20/#specifications
https://www.tp-link.com/za/home-networking/wifi-router/tl-wr840n/#specifications
https://www.tp-link.com/za/home-networking/wifi-router/tl-wr820n/#specifications
https://www.tp-link.com/za/home-networking/wifi-router/tl-wr940n/#specifications
https://www.tp-link.com/za/home-networking/3g-4g-router/tl-mr6400/#specifications
https://www.tp-link.com/us/home-networking/wifi-router/tl-wr841n/#specifications
https://www.tp-link.com/au/home-networking/wifi-router/archer-c24/#specifications


Zyxel: (The second link is 1Gb and the price difference between these 2 is less than $10 here in South Africa...)
https://www.zyxel.com/products_services/AC1200-Dual-Band-Wireless-Router-NBG6604/specifications
https://www.zyxel.com/products_services/AC1200-MU-MIMO-Dual-Band-Wireless-Gigabit-Router-NBG6615/specifications


Tenda:
https://www.tendacn.com/product/specification/f3.html
https://www.tendacn.com/product/specification/F9.html
https://www.tendacn.com/product/specification/ac5v3.html
https://www.tendacn.com/product/specification/ac6.html


D-Link:
https://dlinkmea.com/index.php/product/details?det=TU40UzNYSEUrRGtIS09ONXh5bWJKUT09
https://www.d-link.co.za/product/dap-1360/


ASUS:
https://www.asus.com/Networking-IoT-Servers/WiFi-Routers/ASUS-WiFi-Routers/RT-AC1200-V2/techspec/
https://www.asus.com/Networking-IoT-Servers/WiFi-Routers/ASUS-WiFi-Routers/RT-AC51/techspec/


linksys: This only lists "Fast Ethernet" which means 100Mbps...
https://www.linksys.com/us/wireless-routers/traditional-routers/linksys-wifi-router-dual-band-ac1000-wifi-5/p/p-e5350/


xiaomi: This first one is weird... some places list it has Gb LAN and 100Mbps WAN... so who knows...
https://www.mi.com/global/mi-router-4a/specs
https://www.mi.com/global/mi-router-4c/specs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, Nic_s said:

I'm struggling to understand why 100Mbps is still pretty much everywhere. The manufactures can't mention the incredible wifi speeds enough, but what's the point if it's just going to get choked down to 100Mbps anyway?? Internet speeds are also going up all the time which means 100Mbps is often limiting your internet speeds. I have 200Mbps and so the 100Mbps on this ASUS router makes it kinda useless.

Its quite simple actually, routers with 100Mbit ethernet are intended for broadband much slower than 100Mbit.  The SoC itself may not even have a Gigabit NIC and is certainly too slow to run broadband that fast, so they cut costs and only include a 100Mbit switch too, if it even HAS a switch at all.  Some of these routers are used by ISPs as simply modems too, if they have Cable or DSL modems inside, its all you need.

There will also be some models designs around developing countries where broadband is much slower and wages are low so it may be a choice between that or nothing at all.

Most "Gigabit" routers can't actually handle Gigabit broadband either, its just you either have 100Mbit ports or 1000Mbit ports, there is no technology in-between so they HAVE to use Gigabit ports on all routers that can handle more than 100Mbit.

As for the WiFi speeds, its absolutely deceptive marketing though "technically" correct, as devices may be able to talk to each other at those speeds - but not to anything on the LAN.  Although even that isn't guaranteed as again the CPU power in the router determines how fast it can push WiFi too, not just the broadband side.

Simply put, the consumer router market has been a complete mess since day one but it just got worse when WiFi became a thing.  Another marketing bullet point to make the device seem more capable than it really is.

Router:  Quotom-Q555G6-S05 running pfSense WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (~940Mbit peak)

Switches: Netgear MS510TXUP, Netgear MS510TXPP, Netgear GS110EMX
ISPs: Zen VDSL (~74Mbit) + VOXI 4G [Vodafone] (~120Mbit) + Three 5G (~500Mbit average)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well 1 gbit Network is "standart" for really quite a while now. 

 

Depending where you live, for example here in germany, if you run basic ADSL or VDSL for your interwebs, 100 Mbit is more than enough. *cough* germany is a 3rd world country in regard of LTE coverage and Interwebs speeds... (Ok a new provider did just put a 1 gbit fiber in my living room, I just have to switch to them and pay 20 bucks more for 1000/200 mbit, but this is not the usual case here... and I live in a ~2 mil city... one of the larger ones here...)

so before that 100 mbit would have been enough for the home network, until you run your own lil "datacenter" (small server for files, media etc) or often transfer hugh files from one machine to another... 

 

I haven't seen any 2.5 gbit switches in the wild... but for a while, when you look at amazon/ebay listings plain 1gbit switches are offered there as 2 gbit switches, because the ports do full duplex, meaning 1 gbit in and 1 gbit out the same time, so that ports get called "2 gbit ports" what a scam... 

 

As for "We need 100 mbit switches!" well I can only think of one case, that is if you still run devices that can only do 10 mbit half duplex... a 10G/1G switch might throw up when you connect such a device, there 100 mbit switches that still know morse code and carriere pidgeon come in handy... 

2 Main Systems (mine and my late wifes):

System 1 "Igluna" AsRock Fatal1ty Z77 Pro, Core I5 3570k @4300, 16 GB Ram DDR3 2133, some SSD, and a 2 TB HDD each, Gainward Phantom 760GTX.

System 2 "Inskah" AsRock Fatal1ty Z77 Pro, Core I5 3570k @4300, 16 GB Ram DDR3 2133, some SSD, and a 2 TB HDD each, Gainward Phantom 760GTX.

 

New System in the making "Anghammarad" AsRock Taichi x570, AMD Ryzen 5800X, 32 GB Ram DDR4 3600, some SSD, Gainward Phoenix GS 1060.

 

On the Road: Acer Aspire 5 Model A515-51G-54FD, Intel Core i5 7200U, 8 GB DDR4 Ram, 120 GB SSD, 1 TB HDD, Intel CPU GFX and Nvidia MX 150, Full HD IPS display

 

Media System: Asrock ASRock Z87 Extreme4/TB4, Intel Core i5 4460, 16 GB Ram DDR3 1600 ADATA XPG, 1 275 GB SSD, 4 Seagate Ironwolf 4TB HDD in raid 5, Gainward Phantom 560 GTX (the 560 will be replaced with one of the 760 due to better effeciency)

 

(Abit Fatal1ty FP9 IN SLI, C2Duo E8400, 6 GB Ram DDR2 800, far too less diskspace, Gainward Phantom 560 GTX broken need fixing)

 

Nostalgia: Amiga 1200, Tower Build, CPU/FPU/MMU 68EC020, 68030, 68882 @50 Mhz, 10 MByte ram (2 MB Chip, 8 MB Fast), Fast SCSI II, 2 CDRoms, 2 1 GB SCSI II IBM Harddrives, 512 MB Quantum Lightning HDD, self soldered Sync changer to attach VGA displays, WLAN

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

There is still quite a bit of 100Mbps but usually only in the really low end stuff. 

Lots of people have internet connections <100Mbps and your general user only uses their network for internet, no servers or transfers between devices so they'll never even notice. Easy cost saving by using leftover old chipsets that cost next to nothing. 

F@H
Desktop: i7-5960X 4.4GHz, Noctua NH-D14, ASUS Rampage V, 32GB, RTX3080, 2TB SX8200Pro, 2x16TB Ironwolf RAID0, Corsair HX1200, Thermaltake Overseer RX1, Samsung 4K curved 49" TV, 23" secondary, Mountain Everest Max

Mobile SFF rig: i9-9900K, Noctua NH-L9i, Asrock Z390 Phantom ITX-AC, 32GB, GTX1070, 2x1TB SX8200Pro RAID0, 2x5TB 2.5" HDD RAID0, Athena 500W Flex (Noctua fan), Custom 4.7l 3D printed case

 

Dell XPS 2 in 1 2019, 32GB, 1TB, 4K

 

GPD Win 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Kilrah said:

There is still quite a bit of 100Mbps but usually only in the really low end stuff. 

Lots of people have internet connections <100Mbps and your general user only uses their network for internet, no servers or transfers between devices so they'll never even notice. Easy cost saving by using leftover old chipsets that cost next to nothing. 

The plastic casing probably costs more than the contents on those. 😉

To be honest sometimes they are worth picking up off eBay for the PSU and ethernet cable though.

Router:  Quotom-Q555G6-S05 running pfSense WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (~940Mbit peak)

Switches: Netgear MS510TXUP, Netgear MS510TXPP, Netgear GS110EMX
ISPs: Zen VDSL (~74Mbit) + VOXI 4G [Vodafone] (~120Mbit) + Three 5G (~500Mbit average)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×