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How to undervolt GPU with Voltage Curve Editor (quick)

What you need: 

Heaven benchmark 

Some other benchmark like Superposition 

MSI Afterburner 

Know what your card usually boosts to under load and at what voltage (you can check this with Afterburner and Heaven benchmark  ideally running in a small 720p window so you can still check Afterburner while the benchmark is running)

 

Let's go:

 

1. Open Afterburner. 

ctrlpfmtj74.thumb.png.86404b01601ebf68db5ed296e54cd3ff.png

Press Ctrl + F that opens the voltage curve editor... great!

 

2. Find a voltage point you think is good, this should be lower than what your GPU uses normally, so in my case the RTX 3070 uses around 1.081v and i already know around 1.0v is fine for my card so i choose 993mv:

voltagepointwrj98.thumb.png.869dcfd8d2dbf716417de6cbd4ad1b68.png

you may have to experiment with that a little later,  it's what we're trying to find out after all, at what lowest possible voltage your card is still stable, but most cards should fall into this ballpark. 

 

3. Drag the point you selected to the frequency you want, this should typically be to what your card usually boosts (in my case around 2010mhz) just now with less voltage. Same as above,  some minor adjustments may be necessary later in case it isnt stable, but in most cases it should be fine since its what the card boosts to anyway. 

drgwherpresslpressappdhjd3.thumb.png.17987acbaf3b122619a77f421cb47cd0.png

With the point still selected after dragging it, press L on your keyboard.  Hit apply ✅ in Afterburner.

 

4. Select the point you just adjusted again, notice how the curve is now flattened after it? Thats because we locked the voltage in the previous step, so now press L again,  it will unlock it again, which is what we want and hit apply ✅ again.

selctpresslpressapplywyjqo.thumb.png.63cb3aa0eac078386737a99738fd0944.png

Save your new undervolt profile.

 

 

You're done... off to do some tests for stabiliy with Heaven and if you think it's fine and there are no crashes then test with Superposition also.

 

If it's crashing or not stable,  you probably have to add a little bit more voltage or lower the frequency and do the curve again, but dont go over the voltage your card typically uses, as mentioned in my case 1.081v but that may differ from your card, and also we're here to undervolt.

 

This is by far the fastest method i know of and it works really well in my experience,  how well depends mostly on silicone lottery I guess.

 

Any questions, just ask and have fun with undervolting and a cooler more efficient GPU. 🙂

 

 

 

 

The direction tells you... the direction

-Scott Manley, 2021

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

!remindme 6 days

 

oh wait we dont have bots 😞

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Thanks for the guide.

I just undervolted my RTX 3090, but I dont think it worked. I can still see the volts going back & forth between 865mv to 1025mv.

865mv is what I have undervolted it to. 

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18 hours ago, warsawnato69 said:

Thanks for the guide.

I just undervolted my RTX 3090, but I dont think it worked. I can still see the volts going back & forth between 865mv to 1025mv.

865mv is what I have undervolted it to. 

if your curve is flat after the point you selected it shouldn't do that, ive never seen it doing this, just very slight variances of 25mv or so maybe.

 

whats the normal standard voltage the card does under load at stock settings?  i think 865mv might be a bit too low so it pushes more voltage to stay "alive" maybe.  you could try 930mv or so i guess.

 

you could also post a screenshot of your curve maybe i see something that looks off.

 

ps: maybe you just forgot to apply in the end? it happens.

 

edited the post to make it a bit clearer. 

 

 

 

The direction tells you... the direction

-Scott Manley, 2021

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/8/2022 at 7:29 PM, warsawnato69 said:

Thanks for the guide.

I just undervolted my RTX 3090, but I dont think it worked. I can still see the volts going back & forth between 865mv to 1025mv.

865mv is what I have undervolted it to. 

U have to lock it if u want to to stop at the lower voltage 

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On 12/30/2021 at 11:56 PM, Mark Kaine said:

4. Select the point you just adjusted again, notice how the curve is now flattened after it? Thats because we locked the voltage in the previous step, so now press L again,  it will unlock it again, which is what we want and hit apply ✅ again.

selctpresslpressapplywyjqo.thumb.png.63cb3aa0eac078386737a99738fd0944.png

 

 Should only be "locked" in respect to the curve, as it will not go over whats defined by the flat part, otherwise you'll definitively want to unlock the frequency or the card will never downclock.

 

On 1/17/2022 at 1:40 AM, Ebony Falcon said:

U have to lock it if u want to to stop at the lower voltage 

 

 

 

 

The direction tells you... the direction

-Scott Manley, 2021

 

 

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