Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Two-piece or pass-through rj45 connectors?

Filingo
 Share

Ok so I thought it would be a simple task to get the needed tools and materials, but I found out a whole new world about networking cables and networking specs.

I've decided about most of the materials and tools I need.

Last thing would be the connectors.

I currently have pass-through 5e connectors so that won't be good for the CAT6. Then I found out there is such a thing as a two-piece RJ45, which seem to be better than pass-through.

You don't end up with exposed wires at the end of the connector.

 

What is better/your preferred connector? The pass-through, or the two-piece? And is anything better in terms of interferences?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer passthrough over two piece myself when working with a lot of cables.

Current Network Layout:

Current Build Log/PC:

Prior Build Log/PC:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're seriously overthinking things.

 

If you want to be technical, the best connector is the one that permits the least amount of untwisting of pairs, least length of untwisted wire.

 

Then, a bonus would be more separation between the pairs, hence why some connectors have two rows of wires, staggerred, to increase separation... an example : https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/tripp-lite/N232-050-FTP/13980642

 

I don't know why two piece or pass-through are the only options... what's wrong with plain classic connectors.  I have an ancient crimping tool that has a blade to cut the ends of the wires, so it's super easy to cut the wires to same length and have least amount of untwisted wires and just push the wires in until the reach the end of the connector and crimp the connector.

 

You will most likely find that you can use Cat5e connectors with your cat6 cable and get 10 gbps speeds just fine, without any errors. 

The standards and the requirements are there to make it possible to achieve those speeds - ex. 10gbps - at up to 100 meters of cable, and you're gonna use lengths much shorter than that, and you're gonna use 1 gbps or 2.5 gbps network cards, which are even less sensitive about the quality of the cables and connectors.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, mariushm said:

You're seriously overthinking things.

 

If you want to be technical, the best connector is the one that permits the least amount of untwisting of pairs, least length of untwisted wire.

 

Then, a bonus would be more separation between the pairs, hence why some connectors have two rows of wires, staggerred, to increase separation... an example : https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/tripp-lite/N232-050-FTP/13980642

 

I don't know why two piece or pass-through are the only options... what's wrong with plain classic connectors.  I have an ancient crimping tool that has a blade to cut the ends of the wires, so it's super easy to cut the wires to same length and have least amount of untwisted wires and just push the wires in until the reach the end of the connector and crimp the connector.

 

You will most likely find that you can use Cat5e connectors with your cat6 cable and get 10 gbps speeds just fine, without any errors. 

The standards and the requirements are there to make it possible to achieve those speeds - ex. 10gbps - at up to 100 meters of cable, and you're gonna use lengths much shorter than that, and you're gonna use 1 gbps or 2.5 gbps network cards, which are even less sensitive about the quality of the cables and connectors.

 

thank you, I am definitely overthinking. I will just use what I find.

I guess by the time I'll ever need 10Gbps, the world will look totally different, and IF my current setup won't work, I will just do it again.. but, I learned a few things today

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×