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Hardware connecting to a server

SorenHansen
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I have seen a bunch of youtubers using servers, usually it goes like this:

You install xx server like this, then install this an that and all is hunky dory

 

Now my question is: When I have set up a, let's say, gaming server,

do I connect another pc to the server and game thru the pc on the server ?

do I connect a monitor mouse/keyboard/joystick to the server and game on the server ?

 

If it is a internet server, the same,

Do I connect thru the server, or directly from the server?

 

It is the physical side of using a server that is never explained, looks like all youtubers expects you know what to do on both sides of the server it self

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This really depends on the type of server, and what programs is used.

 

But with something like a game/web server you almost always have a program on your PC(client) that connects to the server program running on the server. Your only connected to the server over the network, no directly.

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Tackling your main question head on and using gaming as an example a server is a usually a separate box which you would have to build or buy. It would host the services necessary for inter-client communication. Think of local 2 player or 4 player but over the network/internet. Your game runs on the computer you're in-front of but the server plays a very critical role in showing you other player location, names, skins, trajectory, commutations (voice/text), among other functions).

 

The game running on your local machine communicates with the server constantly updating this information across every client connected to the same server over an Ethernet cable.

 

So physically the server is just another computer. The hardware is usually a little more special but for DIY operations at home you can often use any desktop hardware you like depending on what services you want the server to host and what OS you plan to run.

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When we talk of server as in server hardware it just means a computer in a corner that's connected to power and network, provides one or more services that multiple people/computers need to access remotely, and usually never sees a screen or keyboard again after the initial setup. 

F@H
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Thank you guys my thinking was right, but I couldn't get it verified before.

Windows7ge you made me remember when we played Doom and Duke Nukem on our BNC connected PC's 😁

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On 12/1/2021 at 5:54 PM, Kilrah said:

When we talk of server as in server hardware it just means a computer in a corner that's connected to power and network, provides one or more services that multiple people/computers need to access remotely, and usually never sees a screen or keyboard again after the initial setup. 

Most never see a keyboard or display ever.  They'll come from the manufacturer either with LOM such as ILO or DRAC, or just set up to PXE boot its OS ... or for big VM clusters, the sysadmin just drops in an SD card with the OS image and powers it on.

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15 hours ago, jec6613 said:

Most never see a keyboard or display ever.  They'll come from the manufacturer either with LOM such as ILO or DRAC, or just set up to PXE boot its OS ... or for big VM clusters, the sysadmin just drops in an SD card with the OS image and powers it on.

Sorry all of this is black talk for me, I litterally have had this server running 24 hours in ½ an hour, but thanks

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