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How to repair a Windows 10 corrupted volumes/partition via a dual booted OS (Linux)

Basically I decided to distro hop from manjaro to endeavour because manjaro was too buggy, and when i finished installing endeavour i restarted and it showed me the "Disk Repair" loading screen, it couldn't fix my windows partition, i also tried troubleshooting, nothing. And all my system backups were inexistant (i shouldve made a new one before installing endeavour), and running command prompt commands didnt work, is there possibly a way? I also read that there is a way to make a recovery usb in linux, don't know how, since I dont have access to a windows 10 to make a recovery usb

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You can download Windows 10 ISO and use something like Etcher to write onto USB drive. Windows installer should contain recovery mode.

 

But try to avoid niche distros that aren't backed by companies who invest money in their product if you want to have usable OS.

Antergos (EndevourOS predecessor) was discontinued because it was mainly one-man project. Same with every other small-scale project.

 

Ubuntu/Fedora aren't bad and you still get relatively fresh packages. If you want rolling release but trying to stay away from raw Arch then just don't.

Arch isn't bad but requires too much attention. openSUSE Tumbleweed might be a better choice than any janky iteration of "user-friendly Arch".

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4 hours ago, gudvinr said:

You can download Windows 10 ISO and use something like Etcher to write onto USB drive. Windows installer should contain recovery mode.

 

But try to avoid niche distros that aren't backed by companies who invest money in their product if you want to have usable OS.

Antergos (EndevourOS predecessor) was discontinued because it was mainly one-man project. Same with every other small-scale project.

 

Ubuntu/Fedora aren't bad and you still get relatively fresh packages. If you want rolling release but trying to stay away from raw Arch then just don't.

Arch isn't bad but requires too much attention. openSUSE Tumbleweed might be a better choice than any janky iteration of "user-friendly Arch".

Okay thank you so much, I'll install it asap

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