Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I have upgraded my gpu from a 1050ti to a gtx 1080 strix recently. Every now and then the monitor turns black and says: "No Signal". When this happens i'm forced to hard reset my pc fixing the problem, until it happens again. I have an average 60hz 1080p monitor with vga output, thus i'm using a VGA to HDMI adapter. I have observed that my gpu has sag, it's tilted at the end bc it's bigger than the 1050ti that I previously had. I put a toilet paper roll under it's corner to slightly fix the problem but this usually results in the fans going full jet mode....have no idea why. Please ask for any mor information, i'm looking foward to find a solution to this problem

Setup:

i5-7400

gtx 1080

2x8gb ddr4 ram

psu 650w + some rgb fans 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bad adapter / what powersupply do you have?

 

Could just be a bad cable too as ive had the same issue, but not with an adapter that is.

Useful threads: PSU Tier List | Motherboard Tier List | Graphics Card Cooling Tier List

ASUS ROG STRIX B350-F Gaming | AMD Ryzen 3600 at 4GHz/1.2vMasterLiquid ML360R RGB | MSI GeForce RTX™ 3080 Ti SUPRIM X | Corsair Vengeance RGB 16GB DDR4 (2x 8GB) 3000 MHz | Corsair RM1000x | Kingston A2000 1TB | Samsung EVO 850 - 500 GB | Samsung EVO Pro 850 - 250 GB Fractal Design R6 Black (Silent) |  Display(s): Samsung Oddesy G7 240hz/1ms, ACER Predator XB271H A 144hz/1ms.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have this . The adapter worked perfectly fine on my 1050ti for 3years...maybe it's that but maybe not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Try laying your computer horizontal, so video card won't sag.

Take out the video card and put it back in.  Maybe the video card isn't seated properly in the slot due to that sag and only uses a few pci-e lanes instead of all 16.

Carefully blow some air in the slot to remove any dust that may be there.

 

The GTX 1080 consumes up to around 200 watts, while the old GTX 1050ti goes up to 75 watts. So your computers' power consumption probably jumped from around 150 watts, to around 300-350 watts.

The power supply.... it's of debatable quality. The label claims it can do 500+ watts on 12v output, so it should be fine.

 

Those hdmi to vga adapters can be a problem, the have a small chip inside them which converts the digital signal into analogue signal (vga). That chip is powered from 5v present into the hdmi connector, which is not supposed to be powerful enough to power chips, it's only there for the monitor to get some power and be able to tell the video card what resolutions the monitor supports and stuff like that.

Some of those conversion chips are also known for working badly and sending power back into the voltage regulator on the video card, causing a spike which may make the video card shut down.

I'd suggest loaning a monitor with digital inputs for a day or two, and see if this issue persists.

Testing with another power supply would also be great, but I can understand if that's more difficult.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, mariushm said:

Try laying your computer horizontal, so video card won't sag.

Take out the video card and put it back in.  Maybe the video card isn't seated properly in the slot due to that sag and only uses a few pci-e lanes instead of all 16.

Carefully blow some air in the slot to remove any dust that may be there.

 

The GTX 1080 consumes up to around 200 watts, while the old GTX 1050ti goes up to 75 watts. So your computers' power consumption probably jumped from around 150 watts, to around 300-350 watts.

The power supply.... it's of debatable quality. The label claims it can do 500+ watts on 12v output, so it should be fine.

 

Those hdmi to vga adapters can be a problem, the have a small chip inside them which converts the digital signal into analogue signal (vga). That chip is powered from 5v present into the hdmi connector, which is not supposed to be powerful enough to power chips, it's only there for the monitor to get some power and be able to tell the video card what resolutions the monitor supports and stuff like that.

Some of those conversion chips are also known for working badly and sending power back into the voltage regulator on the video card, causing a spike which may make the video card shut down.

I'd suggest loaning a monitor with digital inputs for a day or two, and see if this issue persists.

Testing with another power supply would also be great, but I can understand if that's more difficult.

 

I'm going to be honest with you. I've spent the past 1 week taking my gpu out, blowing over the connector, putting it back in and changing videocards even and doing it again....I have done it soo many times i could probs do it with my eyes closed. The thing you mentioned about the adapter is intriguing tho, i'll make sure my next monitor has hdmi output so i can get rid of it (adapter). Laying my pc down will be the next thing I try, so thanks for that idea.

Could maybe swithing to another adapter help? like a VGA to DVI-d? or should i consider dropping the idea of using a adapter in the future? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Because HDMI was designed from the start to support a subset of DVI (making it possible to have DVI-HDMI passive adapters or DVI-HDMI cables), pretty much all chips in DVI - VGA active converters will be the same chips used in HDMI-VGA convertes. They just rearrange wires in the DVI connector.

 

Some adapters will have extra components to filter tne power, some chips will be slightly better designed... you won't know what is used inside whatever adapter you're using.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×