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Home computing pioneer Sir Clive Sinclair dies aged 81

Summary

 

Sometimes called a legend and a pioneer of home computing, Sir Clive Sinclair died at the age of 81.

He was the inventor of ZX Spectrum, the rival Commodore 64.

 

 

800px-ZXSpectrum48k.jpg.bfd9658a123a3d39a5ef90a3aef6f276.jpg

 

 

Quotes

Quote

Creator of the landmark ZX Spectrum and the less commercially successful C5 died after a long illness.

 

Elon Musk, the tesla and SpaceX chief, commented on Twitter on an article calling Sir Clive the father of the ZX Spectrum: “RIP, Sir Sinclair. I loved that computer.”

 

My thoughts

I think that it was the most popular in the UK in the 80's and became really popular in post-USSR in the 90's. This was the machine I first played a computer game on did the first steps in Basic and Assembler.

He is the author of other inventions, like pocket calculator and pocket TV and electric vehicle but he is the most famous for the ZX Spectrum.

 

Sources

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/sep/16/home-computing-pioneer-sir-clive-sinclair-dies-aged-81

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-58587521

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Not just the UK, these were also quite big in Spain.

 

My big brother had one of these, and like you, it was my introduction to gaming - countless hours playing coop in Pang and Joe&Mac Caveman Ninja.

 

F

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yes, indeed there were quire a few games produced in Spain. I do remember how it was an extra challenge to figure out the Spanish menu titles. Humphrey still looks and feels really good.

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Sad to hear of his passing.

I would say the Sinclair computers are relatively unknown to Americans because they never came out here. My biggest exposure to them is from Retro Gamer magazine, which was a British magazine that I used to see on the shelves of Barnes and Noble back when videogame magazines were still a big thing.

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https://news.sky.com/story/sir-clive-sinclair-home-computing-pioneer-and-pocket-calculator-inventor-dies-aged-81-12409968

Quote

 

Sinclair became the first company in the world to sell more than a million computers, making Sir Clive's surname a household name.

 

"He'd come up with an idea and say, 'There's no point in asking if someone wants it, because they can't imagine it'."

 

Tom Watson, former deputy leader of the Labour Party, tweeted: "This man changed the course of my life.

"And arguably, the digital age for us in the UK started with the Sinclair ZX80, when thousands of kids learnt to code using 1k of RAM. For us, the Spectrum was like a Rolls Royce with 48k."

 

Ms Sinclair told the BBC that her father had cancer for more than a decade and was still working on inventions up until last week "because that was what he loved doing".

 

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17 hours ago, DeScruff said:

Sad to hear of his passing.

I would say the Sinclair computers are relatively unknown to Americans because they never came out here. My biggest exposure to them is from Retro Gamer magazine, which was a British magazine that I used to see on the shelves of Barnes and Noble back when videogame magazines were still a big thing.

The US market got the Timex line which was a very slightly upgraded ZX81 but was almost entirely incompatible with Spectrum software...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timex_Sinclair_2068

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The guy was a genius. First cheap digital calculator was what shot the brand up the charts. The chip manufacturers (TI) said what he was proposing was impossible with their chip. They were proved wrong.

 

In a way, we have Sir Clive to thank for ARM. It was due to falling outs and the formation of Acorn that resulted in this. There is a dramatisation of the events here

 

 

 

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