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RJ45 CAT6 Tooless vs crimped any speed loss or issues i should know before buying?

Just wondering if there is any difference between using this plug vs normal crimped plug ?

I always have issues with the crimped plugs ...now my cable doesn't transfer data above 100mb thinking about getting this tool-less plugs but should i ?

 

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“When the last tree is cut down, the last fish eaten and the last stream poisoned, you will realize that you cannot eat money.”
 
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The connector won't affect speed.

 

There rated for the same cat 6 speeds.

 

A 100m cable is almost always due to some cables not being attached right. Id cut the ends off and then crimp on new ends.

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17 minutes ago, Redsiskin said:

I always have issues with the crimped plugs ...now my cable doesn't transfer data above 100mb thinking about getting this tool-less plugs but should i ?

I always use the crimping tool and never had any issues, that being said I don't buy no-name connectors and I always get the pass through variant (way easier than to perfectly cut the wires to length):

image.png.10c4162cdbbd78c3d915a17f4f083139.png

Problem with some no-name connectors is that the metal contacts that are supposed to cut into the wire:

image.png.52cbb477a2e467f235fb40ca168723a3.png

are made out of some really cheap/dirty metal and instead of cutting in they bend or get deflected, ending up in a poor connection.

 

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2 minutes ago, Biohazard777 said:

I always use the crimping tool and never had any issues, that being said I don't buy no-name connectors and I always get the pass through variant (way easier than to perfectly cut the wires to length):

image.png.10c4162cdbbd78c3d915a17f4f083139.png

Problem with no-name connectors is that the metal contacts that are supposed to cut into the wire:

image.png.52cbb477a2e467f235fb40ca168723a3.png

are made out of some really cheap/dirty metal and instead of cutting in they bend or get deflected, ending up in a poor connection.

 

i think that's the problem i have right now...no name brand connectors.

“When the last tree is cut down, the last fish eaten and the last stream poisoned, you will realize that you cannot eat money.”
 
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A good crimping tools matters a lot .. ideally you use the kind that applies the pressure on all contacts evenly (perpendicular to the contacts

 

good : equal pressure on all contacts inside the jack

 

image.png.bdd2a13c44031c301784148324c47f40.png

 

 

bad  :  put more pressure on one side of the jack, plastic can deform

 

image.png.ff87f0a20afb3f81d9ae7156a963a49e.png

 

 

There's actually THREE types of connectors, based on those metal bits and what they're designed for.

 

There's connectors for SOLID CORE wire ethernet cable

There's connectors for STRANDED wire ethernet cable

There's connectors which claim they're universal , as in support both types of cable.

 

If you use connectors for stranded with solid core wire, it may work initially and then loosen over time or the cable fails.

 

image.png.5271f06daec8bda3ee4f2c7f97c50441.png

universal tend to have center tip offset so that solid core wire will be trapped between tips

 

image.png.f278d88b4a7fc3b1cd11444c238a27d4.pngS45-02-sfw.jpg

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