Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Starlink dishes go into “thermal shutdown” once they hit 50°C

10 minutes ago, Spindel said:

I don't think they can, this is not like a satellite dish for TV that only receives signals. It is build for two way communication and you need to have a sender connected to the dish/antenna. 

 

I think he meant moving the processors inside and keeping only the antennas outside (which are not that susceptible to heat).

 

Certainly doable, as cellphone towers do exactly that. How much additional cables, power and shielding would be needed is a great question.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that seems like a major design flaw.

Hell, 50c surface temp is reached frequently in Germany, which is not exactly one of the hottest countries.

 

Kinda expecting A LOT of outages in the coming weeks. 

There is no way 50c surface temps are enough for something that is looking the sun in the eyes 24/7.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is he at home watching YouTube in such a perfect day?

Should be at the beach or mountain

One day I will be able to play Monster Hunter Frontier in French/Italian/English on my PC, it's just a matter of time... 4 5 6 7 8 9 years later: It's finally coming!!!

Phones: iPhone 4S/SE | LG V10 | Lumia 920

Laptops: Macbook Pro 15" (mid-2012) | Compaq Presario V6000

Link to post
Share on other sites

Simple solution it seems would be to just put the dish not on the ground like this dude had it. If the system can get some breeze high up it should be fine maybe a fan could be added for hotter climates.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone who spends a lot of time in the Aussie outback, this is a disturbing turn of events. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Avocado Diaboli said:

It's probably not the dish itself (the parabola) that overheats, it's the electronics at the focal point of the dish. Coating the dish with even more reflective material would only send more heat energy to the device, not less. 

It’s not a parabola, it’s actually flat. It’s a phased array antenna, not a normal dish.

 

I follow r/Starlink relatively closely, and the interesting thing is that out of the many users in the southwest experiencing similar temperatures (including myself), this is the only user to post about dishy actually shutting down, so potentially there is something wrong with this particular unit or the way it is installed.

Current LTT F@H Rank: 77    Score: 996,650,401    Stats

My main Rig (Hybrid Windows 10/Arch Linux):

OS: Arch Linux w/ XFCE DE (Kernel 5.10.7 VFIO) as host OS, windows 10 as guest

CPU: Ryzen 9 3900X w/PBO on (6c 12t for host, 6c 12t for guest)

Cooler: Noctua NH-D15

Mobo: Asus X470-F Gaming

RAM: 32GB G-Skill Ripjaws V @ 3200MHz (12GB for host, 20GB for guest)

GPU: Guest: EVGA RTX 3070 FTW3 ULTRA Host: 2x Radeon HD 8470

PSU: EVGA G2 650W

SSDs: Guest: Samsung 850 evo 120 GB, Samsung 860 evo 1TB Host: Samsung 970 evo 500GB NVME

HDD: Guest: WD Caviar Blue 1 TB

Case: Fractal Design Define R5 Black w/ Tempered Glass Side Panel Upgrade

Other: White LED strip to illuminate the interior. Extra fractal intake fan for positive pressure.

 

unRAID server (Plex, Windows 10 VM, NAS, Duplicati, game servers):

OS: unRAID 6.8.3

CPU: Ryzen R7 2700x @ Stock

Cooler: Noctua NH-U9S

Mobo: Asus Prime X470-Pro

RAM: 16GB G-Skill Ripjaws V + 16GB Hyperx Fury Black @ stock

GPU: EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2

PSU: EVGA G3 850W

SSD: Samsung 970 evo NVME 250GB, Samsung 860 evo SATA 1TB 

HDDs: 4x HGST Dekstar NAS 4TB @ 7200RPM (3 data, 1 parity)

Case: Sillverstone GD08B

Other: Added 3x Noctua NF-F12 intake, 2x Noctua NF-A8 exhaust, Inatek 5 port USB 3.0 expansion card with usb 3.0 front panel header

Details: 12GB ram, GTX 1080, USB card passed through to windows 10 VM. VM's OS drive is the SATA SSD. Rest of resources are for Plex, Duplicati, Spaghettidetective, Nextcloud, and game servers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Spindel said:

This is seriously a big design flaw. 

Well I would say it depends.  If Starlink is anything like Tesla, they might be able to fix things in software first (I'm thinking, they might be able to push a firmware update that utilizes less power, so it dissipates the heat it generates before hitting that threshold).  They might also determine that it can actually survive without damage up to 60C (not saying it will, but maybe).

 

I am betting there will be a hardware update as well though, but I seriously will not be surprised if there is the software/firmware update that increases the acceptable range from 50 to like 60C.

3735928559 - Beware of the dead beef

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sazrocks said:

It’s not a parabola, it’s actually flat. It’s a phased array antenna, not a normal dish.

 

I follow r/Starlink relatively closely, and the interesting thing is that out of the many users in the southwest experiencing similar temperatures (including myself), this is the only user to post about dishy actually shutting down, so potentially there is something wrong with this particular unit or the way it is installed.

Could be a poor installation area where air currents are mostly blocked or it could be something as simple as being near the aircon exchanger. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, BabaGanuche said:

 

You are thinking junction temperature not ambient temperature. 50C ambient is on the upper end of normal electronics. The dish uses about 100 watts it needs to be able to passively dissipate most of the heat, the rest is the actual RF signal it transmits, in a 50 C environment.

I refuse to believe they base it on ambient temp. If it's the brains, you could move them inside of the house, if it's the transmitter, you could go to lower power operation maintaining connection with lower speeds, but mostly that's because the correlation between ambient temperature and the actual device temperature can be very different in varied air pressure, humidity and wind. sazrocks' comment suggests that something could've been wrong with that individual device. I want some more info about this.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, SlidewaysZ said:

Simple solution it seems would be to just put the dish not on the ground like this dude had it. If the system can get some breeze high up it should be fine maybe a fan could be added for hotter climates.

50c is 122f. If it's that hot, it's because of direct sunlight exposure (unless it's in Death Valley, then you're kinda screwed).

 

I'm not sure what the signal attenuation drop would be if you placed another layer of material in front of it. But if possible, providing the sensitive antenna with enough shade via more durable material might be what's called for. Regardless, I'm sure the next product revision will have this problem solved; it's all about engineering.

But it does beg the question: Why didn't this pass extreme environmental testing? Typically that's a process that all outdoor product development goes through; or should at least.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anywhere from 0 to 40 Latitude in either Hemisphere is going to run into issues during the Summer. Looks like whatever mounting approach is going to require separate, isolated location for the processing or the transmitters. 

 

But, yeah, can already see the "Watercooling our internet connection!" LTT video.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is also the first generation of the device. They'll most likely change the instillation requirements and offer a more "rugged" version in the future.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Tech Enthusiast said:

Now that seems like a major design flaw.

Hell, 50c surface temp is reached frequently in Germany, which is not exactly one of the hottest countries.

 

Kinda expecting A LOT of outages in the coming weeks. 

There is no way 50c surface temps are enough for something that is looking the sun in the eyes 24/7.

Where the heck is it hitting 50C/122F in Germany on a regular season basis?

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, LWM723 said:

Even CPU's can handle in excess of 100C.

CPUs, yes. The supporting components such as capacitors and MOSFETs, not so much. 

The pursuit of knowledge for the sake of knowledge.

Forever in search of my reason to exist.

Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Eaglerino said:

Where the heck is it hitting 50C/122F in Germany on a regular season basis?

My guess on most sun heated surfaces, like a satellite dish 

Link to post
Share on other sites

50 degrees?

That's not a lot, a lot of surfaces around the globe hit that when exposed all day to the sun, in Portugal this is even pretty normal, for good reasons during the summer nobody touches metallic surfaces and the streets feel like a gigantic grill...time for some nice engineering from their part to get that tolerance up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, strajk- said:

50 degrees?

That's not a lot, a lot of surfaces around the globe hit that when exposed all day to the sun, in Portugal this is even pretty normal, for good reasons during the summer nobody touches metallic surfaces and the streets feel like a gigantic grill...time for some nice engineering from their part to get that tolerance up.

Doesn't the Concrete that some building with Mirror Finish sits on gets hot enough to fry a couple of eggs? This is in Chicago  I think.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, whm1974 said:

Doesn't the Concrete that some building with Mirror Finish sits on gets hot enough to fry a couple of eggs? This is in Chicago  I think.

Haha, there's an epic failure of a concave building that melted cars in London.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Forbidden Wafer said:

Haha, there's an epic failure of a concave building that melted cars in London.

 

 

 

I found it very amusing that a frying pan gotten hot enough to fry a few eggs in placed in it. And here I thought that was just a figure of speech.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, TVwazhere said:

So... Make one rated from, say 32ºF (0ºC) to 140ºF (60ºC). Climates closer to the Equator dont need freeze protection, so make a "Dishy McHeatface"

Unfortunately it's not really a matter of shifting the temperature range up. The temperature range they indicate has very specific reasons based on the technology used. Phased arrays are incredibly amazing (for example, they are the primary reason the most recent forms of military RADAR have become so amazing), but they're also incredibly hot. In most use cases there is some really beefy active cooling going on to keep them from overheating, the kind that for some reason SpaceX couldn't use with their satellite dishes. Best case scenario it was a cost-saving measure, in that case they can make a (more expensive) version for hotter climates. Worst and more likely case scenario, the design is fundamentally unable to incorporate such cooling and they hae to go back to the drawing table.

My Build:

Spoiler

CPU: i7 4770k GPU: GTX 780 Direct CUII Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero SSD: 840 EVO 250GB HDD: 2xSeagate 2 TB PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 650W

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, BabaGanuche said:

That's the normal masurement usually taken some distance from the surface. When a place hits 30 C it is far from unheard of surface materials often used in construction to approach 50 C. Just try walking in an older city with a lot of stone and marble construction on a hot day (London and Berlin are great examples). The temperature you feel is much warmer and if you put your hand on say the roof of a building (where this satellite dish would be) you can easily burn it if you hold on too long.

My Build:

Spoiler

CPU: i7 4770k GPU: GTX 780 Direct CUII Motherboard: Asus Maximus VI Hero SSD: 840 EVO 250GB HDD: 2xSeagate 2 TB PSU: EVGA Supernova G2 650W

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Zodiark1593 said:

CPUs, yes. The supporting components such as capacitors and MOSFETs, not so much. 

mosfets are even stronger, most are designed to handle 100ºc no problem with shut downs at 125ºC, 150ºC internal temp

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Centurius said:

The temperature you feel is much warmer and if you put your hand on say the roof of a building (where this satellite dish would be) you can easily burn it if you hold on too long.

Now imagine a roof with asphalt shingles (which are dark and I assume heat up quite a lot more than other materials such as clay).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×