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Windows 11 leak [General megathread]

Message added by Spotty,

Do not take this as an opportunity to post inflammatory remarks over operating systems or to argue over which operating system is the best. Treat others with respect, be excellent to each other and don't be a dick.

Discussing the news of the leak and the features that are present in it is fine but we do not allow distribution of copyrighted software, including linking to third party download sites. Do not post guides or links to download or otherwise obtain the leaked copy of Windows 11.

4 minutes ago, leadeater said:

Yes well they are literally the worst offenders in the existence since forever in time, like I said application issue.

 

It wouldn't matter if they wrote to registry, file, SQLite, JSON, YAML, I can guarantee if they couldn't do it properly to registry they couldn't do it to any of these other ways without the same issue. The only real benefit to the other ways are being able to more quickly delete the entire thing, that's it. Still the application at fault not the tool used to store the settings.

 

I don't know if you've ever had to use eTrust antivirus but oh boy that's the biggest pile of garbage ever made and next to impossible to cleanly uninstall.

Not true. Using Linux as an example, when I install Apache it creates an Apache usergroup which only root & apache has access too (at least by default) and any files on the system created by the process are owned by the group. This means that my apache files cannot be modified by other parts of the system.

 

If MS adopted a similar approach it would stop the bad application from being able to, potentially bring down the entire system by editing registry keys that belong to the OS.

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Can anyone confirm whether or not the taskbar is taller than in 10? And whether the scaling is off a bit? Those are my only gripes with most of the screenshots I've seen so far, as they take away from screen real estate a tad.

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iPad 2018 - 128GB

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2 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

I install Apache it creates an Apache usergroup which only root & apache has access too (at least by default) and any files on the system created by the process are owned by the group. This means that my apache files cannot be modified by other parts of the system.

 

If MS adopted a similar approach it would stop the bad application from being able to, potentially bring down the entire system by editing registry keys that belong to the OS.

When you install Apache it does the right thing, that's good. Should you install RandomCrappyLinuxApp (as root, obviously) it could just as much go mess up anything else on the system just like on Windows. 

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5 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

Not true. Using Linux as an example, when I install Apache it creates an Apache usergroup which only root & apache has access too (at least by default) and any files on the system created by the process are owned by the group. This means that my apache files cannot be modified by other parts of the system.

 

If MS adopted a similar approach it would stop the bad application from being able to, potentially bring down the entire system by editing registry keys that belong to the OS.

Can you name an application that has actually changed an OS registry setting like that? And I mean an application not used for changing system level registry settings.

 

For example, when is the last time Adobe Photoshop ever edited a system registry setting, it has no reason to nor anything in the application coded to do that.

 

This is essentially a hypothetical issue not a real life one. The the point is correct in theory it's not in practice and such problems were actually trying to be addressed with things like UWP.

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6 minutes ago, Kilrah said:

When you install Apache it does the right thing, that's good. Should you install RandomCrappyLinuxApp (as root, obviously) it could just as much go mess up anything else on the system just like on Windows. 

Yet another Windows/Linux issue. 99.9% of people shouldn't have to use sudo/administrative privileges, but absolutely everything forces you into privilege escalation. I vote to drag and drop to install an application, run everything sandboxed, and require explicit permission every time the application try to touch a file or setting outside of its own userdata folder.

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8 minutes ago, Master Disaster said:

Not true. Using Linux as an example, when I install Apache it creates an Apache usergroup which only root & apache has access too (at least by default) and any files on the system created by the process are owned by the group. This means that my apache files cannot be modified by other parts of the system.

 

If MS adopted a similar approach it would stop the bad application from being able to, potentially bring down the entire system by editing registry keys that belong to the OS.

The registry does contain ACL permissions FWIW. But I hear what @leadeater is saying about the registry in general. It's not inherently flawed in terms of reliability. But my issue is that broken applications leave their crap behind like rat droppings. I too would rather see more app isolation and sandboxing in this regard. When I delete an app folder, I want all vestiges of it gone as well!

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All I want is:

A unified design: Not even a new one. You could tack on the Luna XP theme and make it consitent and I would be happy.

Lesser bloat: utilities, store and edge are only needed.

Better animations: windows animations are garbage. Repair them

Better resource allocation. I don't want stupid printer spooler running when I am compiling something.

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5 minutes ago, Forbidden Wafer said:

I vote to drag and drop to install an application, run everything sandboxed, and require explicit permission every time the application try to touch a file or setting outside of its own userdata folder.

Systems that are fully sandboxed are so restrictive they become a major pain for other reasons, so no thanks.

You can go use an iPad as computer, it's supposed to be the trend 🙂

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14 minutes ago, AMD A10-9600P said:

Can anyone confirm whether or not the taskbar is taller than in 10? And whether the scaling is off a bit? Those are my only gripes with most of the screenshots I've seen so far, as they take away from screen real estate a tad.

they seem to be the exact same at 1920x1040 (vm), but im not counting the pixel height

please, pm me if you would like to contribute to my gpu bios database (includes overclocking bios, stock bios, and upgrades to gpus via modding)

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prior build:

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14 hours ago, NotTheFirstDaniel said:

In 10 years time, the same people wishing for Aero style icons will be wishing for the Windows 11/Big Sur style icons.

Ugh, some will have to put an end to me if I ever say I like something like that. If it was on me I'd still use the '95 style, simple, intuitive and lightweight, what else could I ask for? 

 

14 hours ago, wkdpaul said:

I'm confused by the aggressively angry reactions to this UI ... You don't like it ? ok, but why get that angry over this ?

 

It looks like Windows 10 with a theme, yet some of the replies make it sound like MS is sacrificing a puppy or something.

I just couldn't find the art from that meme without the text on it.

 

Spoiler
14 hours ago, NotTheFirstDaniel said:

Windows 7 looks dated nowadays

Windows_7_SP1_screenshot.png

3ce74m.png

 

 

 

 Finitude is what the two clock hands indicate as they point towards my cruel destiny. 

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2 minutes ago, HelpfulTechWizard said:

they seem to be the exact same at 1920x1040 (vm), but im not counting the pixel height

Thanks for the reply! As long as it seems the same then that's all that bothers me. I won't personally won't worry about the individual pixels lost or gained as long as it appears the same.

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1 minute ago, AMD A10-9600P said:

Thanks for the reply! As long as it seems the same then that's all that bothers me. I won't personally won't worry about the individual pixels lost or gained as long as it appears the same.

yeah, its probably bc the weird aspect ratio from the leaked pics.

please, pm me if you would like to contribute to my gpu bios database (includes overclocking bios, stock bios, and upgrades to gpus via modding)

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prior build:

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4 minutes ago, Kilrah said:

Systems that are fully sandboxed are so restrictive they become a major pain for other reasons, so no thanks.

You can go use an iPad as computer, it's supposed to be the trend 🙂

I'm talking about the general public and even tech-savvy people when not working. Everyone accepted it is OK to give administrative privileges to every single application (especially installers, which sometimes create background tasks that can elevate privileges without the user interaction), then gets surprised when a ton of malware disrupt hospitals, schools, pipelines, power stations, etc. Not to mention random kernel-level drivers people install with no second-thought.

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26 minutes ago, AMD A10-9600P said:

Can anyone confirm whether or not the taskbar is taller than in 10? And whether the scaling is off a bit? Those are my only gripes with most of the screenshots I've seen so far, as they take away from screen real estate a tad.

 

 

It's a bit taller.

 

image.thumb.png.136bdba456c25cd65e4fe23fd785fdee.png

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Dell XPS 2 in 1 2019, 32GB, 1TB, 4K

 

GPD Win 2

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5 minutes ago, Amias said:

Just looks like a new skin ... 

Thats because it mostly is a just a new skin, windows update shows the OS as still being windows 10.

I've seen claims that it isn't the final build, but have yet to see proof of that. This OS looks final enough for a public release because there isn't any build watermark or disclaimer that its an internal build only. I think this was leaked on purpose to get peoples opinions, lots of companies do it nowadays.

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26 minutes ago, Kilrah said:

  

 

 

It's a bit taller.

 

image.thumb.png.136bdba456c25cd65e4fe23fd785fdee.png

I feel like this may be a subtle hint that Microsoft now prefers taller screens with aspect ratios like 16:10. Or just that they want it to be a bit easier to touch. Either way I hope I can reduce the height or they change it before release as this is ever so slightly noticeable, and I can imagine it'll be even more noticeable on 16:9 displays.

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Laptop - ASUS ZenBook 14 with ScreenPad, i7-1165G7, Xe iGPU 96EU, 16GB Octa-Channel 4200MHz, MX450 2GB, 512GB SSD with 32GB Optane

 

Old Laptop 1 - HP Pavilion 15, A10-9600P, R5 iGPU, 8GB, R8 M445DX, 2TB HDD

Old Laptop 2 - HP Pavilion 15 TouchSmart, i3-3217U, Intel HD 4000, 4GB, 1TB HDD

 

iPad 2018 - 128GB

iPhone XR - 128GB

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41 minutes ago, leadeater said:

Can you name an application that has actually changed an OS registry setting like that? And I mean an application not used for changing system level registry settings.

 

For example, when is the last time Adobe Photoshop ever edited a system registry setting, it has no reason to nor anything in the application coded to do that.

 

This is essentially a hypothetical issue not a real life one. The the point is correct in theory it's not in practice and such problems were actually trying to be addressed with things like UWP.

This is how the majority of malware works. Start by adding entries to the host file then jump into the registry to disable basic stuff like right clicking, task manager etc before finally executing a payload.

 

If registry hives were segmented and had proper ACL it would help to reduce the impact of malware. Not saying it does happen but why should, for example, Photoshop ever require access to the part of the registry that handles critical Windows functions?

 

Containerisation is also another valid option but as already pointed out, that brings a whole different set of problems with it. I don't have any issue with the registry being a thing, I just think its dumb that any app can pretty much change any key it wants and it can do it only because the user is required to grant admin permission at the point of installation.

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56 minutes ago, Kilrah said:

When you install Apache it does the right thing, that's good. Should you install RandomCrappyLinuxApp (as root, obviously) it could just as much go mess up anything else on the system just like on Windows. 

Fair point which is why you don't sudo everything. 99.9% of stuff the user will need to run should be running as either its own user & group or as $USER:$GROUP. Only system daemons need to be running as root.

 

The issue with Windows is security is literally everything or nothing. You're either restricted or you have full control of everything (ignoring ADDS & group policies which only exist in specific circumstances).

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58 minutes ago, StDragon said:

The registry does contain ACL permissions FWIW. But I hear what @leadeater is saying about the registry in general. It's not inherently flawed in terms of reliability. But my issue is that broken applications leave their crap behind like rat droppings. I too would rather see more app isolation and sandboxing in this regard. When I delete an app folder, I want all vestiges of it gone as well!

And those "droppings" do absolutely nothing.  

They're in Reg Subkeys that are no longer referenced by anything, therefore they literally do nothing but take up a few bytes of space in what is essentially a database.

It's kinda like if you have a giant filing cabinet, and you clean out Client XYZ's files, but leave behind a folder with 4 sheets of paper in it.  Does it hurt anything for it to be there?  NOPE, since nothing else will reference that folder.

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41 minutes ago, Kilrah said:

 It's a bit taller.

Feels like they either wanted to fit the day of the week string on the clock by default or want to imitate the MacOS dock but full screen width in size. Other than that idk why it has to be taller, was fine as is at 40px at 1080p

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39 minutes ago, tkitch said:

And those "droppings" do absolutely nothing.  

They're in Reg Subkeys that are no longer referenced by anything, therefore they literally do nothing but take up a few bytes of space in what is essentially a database.

It's kinda like if you have a giant filing cabinet, and you clean out Client XYZ's files, but leave behind a folder with 4 sheets of paper in it.  Does it hurt anything for it to be there?  NOPE, since nothing else will reference that folder.

Not true. They do something bad if the problem remains when you uninstall the application.

Clearly you missed the entire point of my prior rant.

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image.thumb.png.0987f752d04b80149c5fc52fe472f2a9.png

whats with the spacing? Everything is so far apart

please, pm me if you would like to contribute to my gpu bios database (includes overclocking bios, stock bios, and upgrades to gpus via modding)

Bios database

My beautiful, but not that powerful, main PC:

prior build:

Spoiler

 

 

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2 minutes ago, HelpfulTechWizard said:

image.thumb.png.0987f752d04b80149c5fc52fe472f2a9.png

whats with the spacing? Everything is so far apart

View > Options > Folder Options > View Tab > Decrease Space

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13 hours ago, pythonmegapixel said:
20 hours ago, StDragon said:

Secure Boot now a requirement? If so, that explains lack of legacy/BIOS support (UEFI only).

If that's the case, it might be the case that hardware manufacturers will stop allowing us to disable it. (Or, if they don't of their own accord, that Microsoft will bribe them to do so).

Could make it a bit harder to get things other than Windows to run on hardware designed for it in the future.

Well you can still install your own key and sign the bootloader and kernel. However, that is quite a tedious process.

https://github.com/donbowman/ubuntu-secure-boot

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